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Author (up) Alvarez, J.; Fadic, R. file  url
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  Title Assembly and disassembly of axonal microtubules of the toad Xenopus laevis under the effect of temperature Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication The Journal of Experimental Zoology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool  
  Volume 264 Issue 3 Pages 261-266  
  Keywords Animals; Axons/*physiology; Cytoplasm/metabolism; Kinetics; Microtubules/*physiology; Seasons; *Temperature; Tubulin/metabolism; Xenopus laevis  
  Abstract In toads Xenopus laevis living at 11 degrees (winter), the microtubular density of 4-microns myelinated axons of lumbosacral nerves was assessed with the electron microscope. In controls, the density was 11.2 microtubules/microns2. In nerves incubated at 0 degrees, microtubules decreased following a simple exponential curve with a half time of 4.7 min (k = 0.149 min-1); residual microtubules were 4.5%. After rewarming, the full complement of microtubules reappeared within 60 min. In steady state, the microtubular density exhibited a linear relationship with temperature (range: 0-22 degrees; slope 0.94 microtubules/microns 2 per degree; r, 0.96). After heating the nerve by 11 degrees above the physiological temperature, microtubules increased by 83%, whereby the pool of unpolymerized tubulin was at least 2.7 mg/ml of axoplasm. A seasonal variation of the microtubular density was observed which accorded with the environmental temperature. The macroscopic kinetics of microtubule disassembly in the axoplasm is similar to that reported for purified tubulin but that of assembly is slower. Microtubules of peripheral axons of Xenopus are cold-labile and vary during the annual cycle.  
  Call Number Serial 1174  
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Author (up) Amici, M.; Eusebi, F.; Miledi, R. file  url
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  Title Effects of the antibiotic gentamicin on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Neuropharmacology Abbreviated Journal Neuropharmacology  
  Volume 49 Issue 5 Pages 627-637  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents--pharmacology; Cochlea--drug effects; DNA, Complementary--biosynthesis; Electrophysiology; Gentamicins--pharmacology; Humans; Membrane Potentials--drug effects, physiology; Mice; Nicotinic Antagonists; Oocytes--metabolism; Patch-Clamp Techniques; RNA, Complementary--biosynthesis; Receptors, Nicotinic--biosynthesis, drug effects, genetics; Torpedo; Vestibule, Labyrinth--drug effects; Xenopus; alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor  
  Abstract Medical treatment with the aminoglycosidic antibiotic gentamicin may produce side effects that include neuromuscular blockage and ototoxicity; which are believed to result from a dysfunction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Gentamicin is known to reversibly block ACh-currents generated by the activation of muscle-type alphabetagammadelta-AChR and neuronal alpha9-AChR. We studied the effects of gentamicin on heteromeric alphabetagammadelta-AChR and homomeric alpha7-AChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Prolonged treatment with gentamicin, and other antibiotics, differentially altered alphabetagammadelta- and alpha7-AChR responses. Specifically, gentamicin accelerated desensitization and did not reduce ACh-currents in oocytes expressing alphabetagammadelta-AChRs, whereas ACh-currents were reduced and desensitization was unaltered in oocytes expressing alpha7-AChRs. Moreover, acutely applied gentamicin acted as a competitive antagonist on both types of receptors and increased the rate of desensitization in alphabetagammadelta-AChR while reducing the rate of desensitization in alpha7-AChR. This data helps to better understand the action of gentamicin on muscle and nervous tissues, providing mechanistic insights that could eventually lead to improving the medical use of aminoglycosides.  
  Call Number Serial 445  
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Author (up) Berzins, D.W.; Bundy, K.J. file  url
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  Title Bioaccumulation of lead in Xenopus laevis tadpoles from water and sediment Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int  
  Volume 28 Issue 1-2 Pages 69-77  
  Keywords Animals; Body Weight/drug effects; Environmental Pollutants/*pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Fresh Water/chemistry; Geologic Sediments/chemistry; Larva/*chemistry/growth & development; Lead/*pharmacokinetics/toxicity; Louisiana; *Xenopus  
  Abstract The overall objective of this research was to monitor the uptake kinetics of lead in an amphibian model and correlate metal content with embryo development. Based upon the concentration of lead found in the water and sediment of a Louisiana swamp adjacent to a Superfund site, a controlled laboratory experiment exploring lead uptake from water and sediment by Xenopus laevis tadpoles was conducted. For 5 weeks, tadpoles were exposed to water and a simulated sediment, kaolin, spiked with 1, 5, or 10 times the concentration of lead found in field water and sediment samples. Additionally, organisms were exposed to the 5 x condition for 3 and 6 weeks. The experimental controls consisted of unexposed tadpoles and ones exposed to lead originating from water or sediment exclusively. At the end of the exposure periods, developmental data, i.e., body weight and developmental stage, were recorded, and the tadpoles were analyzed for whole body lead concentration. Lead extraction was accomplished by dry ashing, and its amount was quantified polarographically. Results showed that lead inhibited the normal development of these amphibians, in a manner that generally was more severe as exposure level increased. The hindrance of tadpole development also coincided with an increase in whole body lead concentration at higher exposures. Temporally, at the 5 x exposure concentration, the mean lead level increased with time, but this difference was not statistically significant (P<.05). Additionally, control animals exposed to lead (either in water or in sediment) showed no statistical difference with regard to weight and lead uptake, indicating that lead originating from both water and sediment is incorporated into the tadpole. The controlled laboratory experimental protocol used here is thus capable of investigating the uptake of a single metal (Pb in this case) and determining its effect on the development of tadpoles while differentiating the significance of multiple sources of exposure.  
  Call Number Serial 1183  
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Author (up) Bucher, D.; Buchner, E. file  url
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  Title Stimulating PACalpha increases miniature excitatory junction potential frequency at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Neurogenetics Abbreviated Journal J Neurogenet  
  Volume 23 Issue 1-2 Pages 220-224  
  Keywords Adenylyl Cyclases/*physiology; Animals; Cyclic AMP/physiology; Drosophila/*physiology; Enzyme Activation/radiation effects; Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials/physiology; Light Signal Transduction/physiology; Miniature Postsynaptic Potentials/physiology; Motor Neurons/enzymology; Neuromuscular Junction/*physiology; Photic Stimulation/methods; Synapses/enzymology/physiology  
  Abstract Photoactivated adenylate cyclase alpha (PACalpha) is a light-activated adenylate cyclase that was originally cloned from the eye spot of the protozoan Euglena gracilis. PACalpha has been shown to rapidly increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in vivo in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, increase the spike width in Aplysia sensory neurons, and modify behavior in Drosophila. Using the GAL4 UAS system, we heterologously expressed PACalpha in motorneurons and quantified the effects of its activation at the neuromuscular junction of the Drosophila third instar wandering larva, a well-characterized model synapse. By recording from body-wall muscle 6, we show that the presynaptic activation of PACalpha with blue light significantly increased miniature excitatory junction potential (mEJP) frequency in the presence of calcium with a delay of about 1 minute. Similar effects have been observed in previous studies that utilized adenylate cyclase agonists (Forskolin) or membrane-permeable cAMP analogs [dibutyryl cAMP and 4-chlorophenylthio-(CPT)-cAMP] to increase presynaptic cAMP concentrations. PACalpha's efficacy in combination with its specificity make it an invaluable tool for the rapid regulation of cAMP in vivo and for investigating the mechanisms by which cAMP can modulate synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity in Drosophila.  
  Call Number Serial 1255  
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Author (up) Chu, D.T.; Klymkowsky, M.W. file  url
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  Title The appearance of acetylated alpha-tubulin during early development and cellular differentiation in Xenopus Type Journal Article
  Year 1989 Publication Developmental Biology Abbreviated Journal Dev Biol  
  Volume 136 Issue 1 Pages 104-117  
  Keywords Acetylation; Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal; Blastocyst/metabolism; Blotting, Western; Cell Differentiation; Epidermis/metabolism; Fluorescent Antibody Technique; Gastrula/metabolism; Immunohistochemistry; Meiosis; Microtubules/metabolism; Nervous System/embryology/metabolism; Spindle Apparatus/metabolism; Tubulin/immunology/*metabolism; Xenopus/*embryology; Zygote/metabolism  
  Abstract Early development in Xenopus is characterized by dramatic changes in the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. We have used whole-mount immunocytochemistry to follow the expression of the acetylated form of alpha-tubulin during early Xenopus development. In the egg and early embryo, the monoclonal anti-acetylated tubulin antibody 6-11B-1 stained meiotic and mitotic spindles, midbody microtubules, and what appears to be the central region of the sperm aster; the antibody did not stain the sperm aster itself or the cortical microtubule system associated with the rotation of the fertilized egg. Following gastrulation, acetylated tubulin disappeared from all but mitotic midbody microtubules. During the course of neurulation high levels of acetylated tubulin reappeared in the precursors of the ciliated epidermal cells (stage 15), transiently in neural folds (stage 16/17), in neuronal processes (stage 18/19), and in somas (stage 21). The changing pattern of anti-acetylated tubulin staining during Xenopus development raises intriguing questions as to the physiological significance of tubulin acetylation.  
  Call Number Serial 1041  
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