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Author (up) Bhadra, K.; Kumar, G.S. file  url
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  Title Therapeutic potential of nucleic acid-binding isoquinoline alkaloids: binding aspects and implications for drug design Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Medicinal Research Reviews Abbreviated Journal Med Res Rev  
  Volume 31 Issue 6 Pages 821-862  
  Keywords Alkaloids/*chemistry; Animals; Benzophenanthridines/chemistry; Berberine/analogs & derivatives/chemistry; Berberine Alkaloids/chemistry; Calorimetry/methods; Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/*methods; DNA/chemistry; *Drug Design; Humans; Isoquinolines/*chemistry; Mice; Models, Chemical; Nucleic Acids/*chemistry; RNA/chemistry; Spectrophotometry/methods; Temperature  
  Abstract Isoquinoline alkaloids represent a group of natural products with remarkable importance in the contemporary biomedical research and drug discovery programs. Several members of this group exhibit immense pharmacological and biological properties, including potential anticancer properties. Although the molecular targets of these alkaloids are not yet clearly delineated, extensive research in this area continues to build up new data that are clinically exploitable. The gross structural features of many of the members DNA interaction are more or less clear, but the mystery still remains on many aspects of their binding, including specificity and energetics. RNA-binding aspects of these alkaloids are being elucidated. More recent advancements in analytical instrumentation have enabled clearer elucidation and correlation of the structural and energetic aspects of the interaction. In this review, we report up-to-date details of the interaction of berberine, palmatine, and jatrorrhizine of the protoberberine group, sanguinarine from the benzophananthridine group, and several of their synthetic derivatives, such as coralyne, berberrubine, palmatrubine, and jatrorubin with nucleic acids have been reviewed. These studies, taken together up to now, have led to interesting knowledge on the mode, mechanism, specificity of binding, and correlation between structural aspects and energetics enabling a complete set of guidelines for design of new drugs. In contemporary research, several derivatives of these natural alkaloids are being prepared and investigated in several laboratories for ultimate discovery of new compounds that can be used as effective therapeutic agents.  
  Call Number Serial 400  
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Author (up) Citron, M. file  url
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  Title Alzheimer's disease: treatments in discovery and development Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci  
  Volume 5 Suppl Issue Pages 1055-1057  
  Keywords Alzheimer Disease/metabolism/physiopathology/*therapy; Amyloid beta-Peptides/*antagonists & inhibitors/biosynthesis; Animals; Brain/*drug effects/metabolism/physiopathology; Disease Models, Animal; *Drug Design; Drug Evaluation/trends; Drug Industry/trends; Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology/therapeutic use; Humans  
  Abstract Alzheimer's disease is the single biggest unmet medical need in neurology. Current drugs are safe, but of limited benefit to most patients. This review discusses the scientific basis and current status of promising disease-modifying therapies in the discovery and development stages. I describe the major targets of anti-amyloid therapy and the main focus of disease modification approaches. In addition, two new potential treatment approaches supported by retrospective epidemiology are outlined.  
  Call Number Serial 137  
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Author (up) Spellberg, B.; Shlaes, D. file  url
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  Title Prioritized current unmet needs for antibacterial therapies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Abbreviated Journal Clin Pharmacol Ther  
  Volume 96 Issue 2 Pages 151-153  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Bacterial Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology; *Drug Design; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/*drug effects/physiology; Health Priorities/*trends; Health Services Needs and Demand/*trends; Humans  
  Abstract As a result of declining new antibacterial approvals and rising antibiotic resistance, society clearly needs new treatments for bacterial infections. Specific areas of unmet need evolve over time owing to changes in resistance patterns and treatment strategies. Our goal here is to describe and prioritize the current areas of greatest unmet need for new antibacterial development based on an understanding of the most serious treatment challenges facing patients and their providers today.  
  Call Number Serial 1891  
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