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Author (up) Elaad, E.; Ben-Shakhar, G. file  url
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  Title Finger pulse waveform length in the detection of concealed information Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Psychophysiol  
  Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 226-234  
  Keywords Adult; Arousal/*physiology; Attention/*physiology; Autonomic Nervous System/physiology; Female; Galvanic Skin Response/*physiology; *Guilt; Habituation, Psychophysiologic/physiology; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Lie Detection/*psychology; Male; Mathematical Computing; Orientation/physiology; Plethysmography/statistics & numerical data; Problem Solving/*physiology; Pulse/*statistics & numerical data; Reference Values; *Respiration; Sensitivity and Specificity; Theft/*psychology  
  Abstract An attempt was made to assess the efficiency of the finger pulse waveform length (FPWL), in detection of concealed information. For this purpose, two mock-theft experiments were designed. In the first, 40 guilty participants were examined while electrodermal, respiration and finger pulse volume were recorded. Results showed that detection accuracy with the FPWL was at least as good as the accuracy obtained with the other two measures (respiration changes and skin conductance responses). Detection efficiency was further improved when a combination of FPWL with the other two measures was used. In the second experiment, 39 guilty and 23 innocent participants were instructed to deny knowledge while the transducers were not attached to them. Then, the same questions were repeated while electrodermal, respiration and finger pulse volume were recorded. Results showed reduced rates of identification compared to the first experiment, which were explained by habituation. However, finger pulse was less affected by habituation than both respiration and skin conductance. Results suggested that the FPWL might be a useful addition to the existing measures in the detection of concealed information.  
  Call Number Serial 1443  
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