more information
Search within Results:

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Chilamkurti, C.; Milner, J.S. file  url
openurl 
  Title Perceptions and evaluations of child transgressions and disciplinary techniques in high- and low-risk mothers and their children Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Child Development Abbreviated Journal Child Dev  
  Volume 64 Issue 6 Pages 1801-1814  
  Keywords Child; Child Abuse/diagnosis; Child Behavior/psychology; Cognition; Female; Humans; Imagination; *Interpersonal Relations; Male; Maternal Behavior; *Mother-Child Relations; *Mothers; *Parenting  
  Abstract Perceptions and evaluations of children's transgressions (moral, conventional, personal), parental disciplinary actions (power assertion, love withdrawal, induction), and expected outcomes (compliance) were assessed in matched high- and low-risk (for physical abuse) mothers and their children. High-risk mothers and their children evaluated conventional and personal transgressions as more wrong than low-risk mothers and their children. Although both high- and low-risk mothers and their children varied disciplinary responses according to the type of transgression, high-risk mothers used power assertion (verbal and physical force) more often and induction (reasoning and explanation) less often. High-risk mothers also perceived the use of power assertion by others as more appropriate. With respect to outcomes, high-risk mothers, compared to low-risk mothers, expected less compliance following moral transgressions and more compliance after personal transgressions. Children of both high- and low-risk mothers made compliance predictions following moral and personal transgressions that were similar to the low-risk mothers' predictions.  
  Call Number Serial 1732  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Long, N.; Forehand, R.; Fauber, R.; Brody, G.H. file  url
openurl 
  Title Self-perceived and independently observed competence of young adolescents as a function of parental marital conflict and recent divorce Type Journal Article
  Year 1987 Publication Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology Abbreviated Journal J Abnorm Child Psychol  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 15-27  
  Keywords *Achievement; Adolescent; Adolescent Psychology; Child; Cognition; *Divorce; Female; Humans; *Interpersonal Relations; Male; *Marriage; Mother-Child Relations; Peer Group; Self Concept; Social Desirability  
  Abstract The self-perceived and independently observed cognitive and social competence of young adolescents as a function of parental conflict and recent divorce was investigated. Subjects were 40 young adolescents between the ages of 11 years 1 month and 15 years 1 month. A 2 X 2 factorial design was used, with the independent variables being parental marital status (married vs. recently divorced) and parental conflict (high vs. low). Dependent variables included the following measures of adolescent competence: adolescent-completed measures of self-perceived competence, teacher-completed measures, behavioral observations, and school grades. The results indicated that the level of parental conflict, rather than parental marital status, appears to be the critical variable associated with adolescents' independently observed levels of cognitive and social competence. In regard to adolescents' self-perceived levels of cognitive and social competence, parental marital status was found to be the critical variable. The implications of these findings are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 286  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Loveland, K.A.; Tunali, B. file  url
openurl 
  Title Social scripts for conversational interactions in autism and Down syndrome Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Autism Dev Disord  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 177-186  
  Keywords Adolescent; Affect; Autistic Disorder/*diagnosis/psychology; Awareness; Child; Child, Preschool; Down Syndrome/*diagnosis/psychology; Female; Humans; *Interpersonal Relations; Language Tests; Male; Nonverbal Communication; Social Behavior; *Social Environment; Speech Intelligibility; *Verbal Behavior  
  Abstract The ability of high-functioning verbal individuals with autism or Down syndrome (DS) to respond appropriately to conversational “social scripts” involving responding to another person's distress was investigated. Subjects were 13 persons with autism and 13 with DS, matched on verbal mental age. During a “tea party” situation, subjects were each told about an examiner's unhappy personal experience (e.g., a stolen wallet). If the subject did not produce an acceptable response after several probes (e.g., “My money's gone; now I can't buy groceries”), the other examiner modeled a sympathetic response and more probes were administered. Subjects with DS gave a significantly greater percentage of relevant suggestions and sympathetic comments, whereas subjects with autism gave a significantly greater percentage of responses relating only to the tea party. Significantly more subjects with autism than DS required modeling. Although a smaller percentage of subjects in the autism group than the DS group exhibited improvement after modeling, some subjects with autism were able to improve, suggesting that they understood some aspects of the social situation (the social script) but needed help formulating an appropriate response.  
  Call Number Serial 971  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) O'Doherty, K.; Troseth, G.L.; Shimpi, P.M.; Goldenberg, E.; Akhtar, N.; Saylor, M.M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Third-party social interaction and word learning from video Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Child Development Abbreviated Journal Child Dev  
  Volume 82 Issue 3 Pages 902-915  
  Keywords Attention; Child, Preschool; Comprehension; Cues; Female; Humans; Imitative Behavior; *Interpersonal Relations; *Language Development; Male; *Social Environment; *Speech Perception; Television; *Verbal Learning; *Video Recording  
  Abstract In previous studies, very young children have learned words while “overhearing” a conversation, yet they have had trouble learning words from a person on video. In Study 1, 64 toddlers (mean age=29.8 months) viewed an object-labeling demonstration in 1 of 4 conditions. In 2, the speaker (present or on video) directly addressed the child, and in 2, the speaker addressed another adult who was present or was with her on video. Study 2 involved 2 follow-up conditions with 32 toddlers (mean age=30.4 months). Across the 2 studies, the results indicated that toddlers learned words best when participating in or observing a reciprocal social interaction with a speaker who was present or on video.  
  Call Number Serial 1969  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations: