Records Links
Author Schechter, D.S.; Coots, T.; Zeanah, C.H.; Davies, M.; Coates, S.W.; Trabka, K.A.; Marshall, R.D.; Liebowitz, M.R.; Myers, M.M. file  url
openurl 
Title Maternal mental representations of the child in an inner-city clinical sample: violence-related posttraumatic stress and reflective functioning Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Attachment & Human Development Abbreviated Journal Attach Hum Dev  
Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages 313-331  
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Analysis of Variance; Child Abuse/prevention & control/psychology; Child of Impaired Parents/psychology; Child, Preschool; Female; Humans; Infant; Logistic Models; *Mental Processes; Middle Aged; *Mother-Child Relations; Parenting/*psychology; Poverty Areas; Risk Factors; *Social Perception; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/*psychology; United States; Violence/*psychology  
Abstract Parental mental representations of the child have been described in the clinical literature as potentially useful risk-indicators for the intergenerational transmission of violent trauma. This study explored factors associated with the quality and content of maternal mental representations of her child and relationship with her child within an inner-city sample of referred, traumatized mothers. Specifically, it examined factors that have been hypothesized to support versus interfere with maternal self- and mutual-regulation of affect: posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and maternal reflective functioning (RF). More severe PTSD, irrespective of level of RF, was significantly associated with the distorted classification of non-balanced mental representations on the Working Model of the Child Interview (WMCI) within this traumatized sample. Higher Levels of RF, irrespective of PTSD severity, were significantly associated with the balanced classification of maternal mental representations on the WMCI. Level of maternal reflective functioning and severity of PTSD were not significantly correlated in this sample. Clinical implications are discussed.  
Call Number Serial 2171  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fausey, C.M.; Jayaraman, S.; Smith, L.B. file  url
openurl 
Title From faces to hands: Changing visual input in the first two years Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Cognition Abbreviated Journal Cognition  
Volume 152 Issue Pages 101-107  
Keywords *Child Development; Child, Preschool; *Facial Recognition; Female; Hand; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pattern Recognition, Visual; Photic Stimulation; *Social Perception; Statistics as Topic; *Visual Perception; *Egocentric vision; *Faces; *Hands; *Head camera; *Infancy; *Scene statistics  
Abstract Human development takes place in a social context. Two pervasive sources of social information are faces and hands. Here, we provide the first report of the visual frequency of faces and hands in the everyday scenes available to infants. These scenes were collected by having infants wear head cameras during unconstrained everyday activities. Our corpus of 143hours of infant-perspective scenes, collected from 34 infants aged 1month to 2years, was sampled for analysis at 1/5Hz. The major finding from this corpus is that the faces and hands of social partners are not equally available throughout the first two years of life. Instead, there is an earlier period of dense face input and a later period of dense hand input. At all ages, hands in these scenes were primarily in contact with objects and the spatio-temporal co-occurrence of hands and faces was greater than expected by chance. The orderliness of the shift from faces to hands suggests a principled transition in the contents of visual experiences and is discussed in terms of the role of developmental gates on the timing and statistics of visual experiences.  
Call Number Serial 1820  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fausey, C.M.; Jayaraman, S.; Smith, L.B. file  url
openurl 
Title From faces to hands: Changing visual input in the first two years Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Cognition Abbreviated Journal Cognition  
Volume 152 Issue Pages 101-107  
Keywords *Child Development; Child, Preschool; *Facial Recognition; Female; Hand; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pattern Recognition, Visual; Photic Stimulation; *Social Perception; Statistics as Topic; *Visual Perception; *Egocentric vision; *Faces; *Hands; *Head camera; *Infancy; *Scene statistics  
Abstract Human development takes place in a social context. Two pervasive sources of social information are faces and hands. Here, we provide the first report of the visual frequency of faces and hands in the everyday scenes available to infants. These scenes were collected by having infants wear head cameras during unconstrained everyday activities. Our corpus of 143hours of infant-perspective scenes, collected from 34 infants aged 1month to 2years, was sampled for analysis at 1/5Hz. The major finding from this corpus is that the faces and hands of social partners are not equally available throughout the first two years of life. Instead, there is an earlier period of dense face input and a later period of dense hand input. At all ages, hands in these scenes were primarily in contact with objects and the spatio-temporal co-occurrence of hands and faces was greater than expected by chance. The orderliness of the shift from faces to hands suggests a principled transition in the contents of visual experiences and is discussed in terms of the role of developmental gates on the timing and statistics of visual experiences.  
Call Number Serial 1801  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Swami, V.; Furnham, A. file  url
doi  openurl
Title Unattractive, promiscuous and heavy drinkers: perceptions of women with tattoos Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Body Image Abbreviated Journal Body Image  
Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages 343-352  
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Alcohol Drinking/*psychology; *Attitude; *Beauty; Female; *Gender Identity; Hair Color; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Sexual Behavior; Social Conformity; Social Desirability; *Social Perception; *Stereotyping; Tattooing/*psychology  
Abstract This study examined social and physical perceptions of blonde and brunette women with different degrees of tattooing. Eighty-four female and 76 male undergraduates rated a series of 16 female line drawings that varied in 2 levels of hair colour and 8 levels of tattooing. Ratings were made for physical attractiveness and sexual promiscuity, as well as estimates of the number of alcohol units consumed on a typical night out. Results showed that tattooed women were rated as less physically attractive, more sexually promiscuous and heavier drinkers than untattooed women, with more negative ratings with increasing number of tattoos. There were also weak interactions between body art and hair colour, with blonde women in general rated more negatively than brunettes. Results are discussed in terms of stereotypes about women who have tattoos and the effects of such stereotypes on well-being.  
Call Number Serial 1040  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schultz, R.T. file  url
openurl 
Title Developmental deficits in social perception in autism: the role of the amygdala and fusiform face area Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the International Society for Developmental Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Int J Dev Neurosci  
Volume 23 Issue 2-3 Pages 125-141  
Keywords Amygdala/growth & development/*physiopathology; Autistic Disorder/*physiopathology; *Facial Expression; Form Perception/physiology; Gyrus Cinguli/growth & development/*physiopathology; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Models, Biological; *Social Perception  
Abstract Autism is a severe developmental disorder marked by a triad of deficits, including impairments in reciprocal social interaction, delays in early language and communication, and the presence of restrictive, repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. In this review, it is argued that the search for the neurobiological bases of the autism spectrum disorders should focus on the social deficits, as they alone are specific to autism and they are likely to be most informative with respect to modeling the pathophysiology of the disorder. Many recent studies have documented the difficulties persons with an autism spectrum disorder have accurately perceiving facial identity and facial expressions. This behavioral literature on face perception abnormalities in autism is reviewed and integrated with the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature in this area, and a heuristic model of the pathophysiology of autism is presented. This model posits an early developmental failure in autism involving the amygdala, with a cascading influence on the development of cortical areas that mediate social perception in the visual domain, specifically the fusiform “face area” of the ventral temporal lobe. Moreover, there are now some provocative data to suggest that visual perceptual areas of the ventral temporal pathway are also involved in important ways in representations of the semantic attributes of people, social knowledge and social cognition. Social perception and social cognition are postulated as normally linked during development such that growth in social perceptual skills during childhood provides important scaffolding for social skill development. It is argued that the development of face perception and social cognitive skills are supported by the amygdala-fusiform system, and that deficits in this network are instrumental in causing autism.  
Call Number Serial 944  
Permanent link to this record