more information
Search within Results:

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Arai, L. file  url
openurl 
  Title Peer and neighbourhood influences on teenage pregnancy and fertility: qualitative findings from research in English communities Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Health & Place Abbreviated Journal Health Place  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 87-98  
  Keywords Abortion, Induced/utilization; Adolescent; Adult; Attitude to Health/*ethnology; Birth Rate; England; Female; Geography; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Mothers/education/psychology; *Peer Group; Pregnancy; Pregnancy in Adolescence/*ethnology/psychology; Qualitative Research; Residence Characteristics/*classification; *Social Class; *Social Conformity; Social Values/ethnology; Socioeconomic Factors  
  Abstract Geographic variation in teenage pregnancy is attributable to social and cultural, as well as demographic, factors. In some communities and social networks early childbearing may be acceptable, or even normative. It is these places that are the focus of policy initiatives. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study of neighbourhood and peer influences on the transition from pregnancy to fertility among 15 young mothers in three English locations. Data were also collected from nine local health workers. The findings show that, from the mothers' perspective, there was no evidence that peers influenced behaviour. However, the data did suggest that early childbearing might be normative in some communities.  
  Call Number Serial 1343  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Armstrong-Brown, J.; Eng, E.; Hammond, W.P.; Zimmer, C.; Bowling, J.M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Redefining racial residential segregation and its association with physical activity among African Americans 50 years and older: a mixed methods approach Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Aging and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal J Aging Phys Act  
  Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 237-246  
  Keywords African Americans/*statistics & numerical data; Age Factors; Aged; Attitude to Health/*ethnology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Geography; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Motor Activity/*physiology; Multivariate Analysis; Racism/ethnology/*statistics & numerical data; Regression Analysis; Risk Assessment; Sex Factors; Time Factors; United States  
  Abstract Physical inactivity is one of the factors contributing to disproportionate disease rates among older African Americans. Previous literature indicates that older African Americans are more likely to live in racially segregated neighborhoods and that racial residential segregation is associated with limited opportunities for physical activity. A cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted guided by the concept of therapeutic landscapes. Multilevel regression analyses demonstrated that racial residential segregation was associated with more minutes of physical activity and greater odds of meeting physical activity recommendations. Qualitative interviews revealed the following physical activity related themes: aging of the neighborhood, knowing your neighbors, feeling of safety, and neighborhood racial identity. Perceptions of social cohesion enhanced participants' physical activity, offering a plausible explanation to the higher rates of physical activity found in this population. Understanding how social cohesion operates within racially segregated neighborhoods can help to inform the design of effective interventions for this population.  
  Call Number Serial 1292  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Feng, L.; Chiam, P.C.; Kua, E.-H.; Ng, T.P. file  url
openurl 
  Title Use of complementary and alternative medicines and mental disorders in community-living Asian older adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gerontol Geriatr  
  Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 243-249  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Asian Continental Ancestry Group; Attitude to Health/*ethnology; Complementary Therapies/*utilization; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/therapy; Drug Utilization; *Drugs, Chinese Herbal; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Mental Disorders/*therapy; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Patient Acceptance of Health Care; Singapore  
  Abstract The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) and its link with mental health is poorly understood. It is not clear whether mentally ill persons use CAM because conventional medical care does not meet their needs. In a nationally representative random sample of 1092 individuals aged 60 in Singapore, we determined CAM use and the prevalence of mental disorders using Geriatric Mental State (GMS) and found that overall CAM use, predominantly Chinese herbal medicines, was reported by an estimated 42.7% of the population. Depression (odds ratio=OR=1.94; 95% CI=1.26-2.98) and poor self-rated mental health (OR=2.44; 95% CI=1.25-4.80) were associated with CAM use, independently of other risks factors and correlates of CAM use. Although depressed Asians more frequently used CAM than conventional health care, we could find no evidence in this study to indicate that among individuals with depression, CAM users compared to nonusers, were less likely to seek treatment from general and mental health professionals or were more likely to have negative beliefs and attitudes about mental illnesses and its treatment. This is consistent with the common observation that the use of CAM complements rather than replaces conventional treatments.  
  Call Number Serial 1347  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations: