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Author (up) Buguet, A. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Sleep under extreme environments: effects of heat and cold exposure, altitude, hyperbaric pressure and microgravity in space Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Journal of the Neurological Sciences Abbreviated Journal J Neurol Sci  
  Volume 262 Issue 1-2 Pages 145-152  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological/physiology; Atmospheric Pressure; *Climate; Cold Temperature/adverse effects; *Environment; Hot Temperature/adverse effects; Humans; Sleep/*physiology; Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology/*physiopathology; Space Flight; Weightlessness/adverse effects  
  Abstract Human sleep is sensitive to the individual's environment. The present review examines current knowledge of human sleep patterns under different environments: heat exposure, cold exposure, altitude, high pressure and microgravity in space. Heat exposure has two effects. In people living in temperate conditions, moderate heat loads (hot bath, sauna) prior to sleep provoke a delayed reaction across time (diachronic reaction) whereby slow-wave sleep (SWS) augments in the following night (neurogenic adaptive pathway). Melanoids and Caucasians living in the Sahel dry tropical climate experience diachronic increases in SWS throughout seasonal acclimatization. Such increases are greater during the hot season, being further enhanced after daytime exercise. On the contrary, when subjects are acutely exposed to heat, diachronic decreases in total sleep time and SWS occur, being often accompanied by synchronic (concomitant) diminution in REM sleep. Stress hormones increase. Nocturnal cold exposure provokes a synchronic decrease in REM sleep along with an activation of stress hormones (synchronic somatic reaction). SWS remains undisturbed as it still occurs at the beginning of the night before nocturnal body cooling. Altitude and high pressure are deleterious to sleep, especially in non-acclimatized individuals. In their controlled environment, astronauts can sleep well in microgravity. Exercise-induced sleep changes help to understand environmental effects on sleep: well-tolerated environmental strains may improve sleep through a neurogenic adaptive pathway; when this “central” adaptive pathway is overloaded or bypassed, diachronic and synchronic sleep disruptions occur.  
  Call Number Serial 1141  
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Author (up) Kosova, K.; Vitamvas, P.; Prasil, I.T.; Renaut, J. file  url
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  Title Plant proteome changes under abiotic stress--contribution of proteomics studies to understanding plant stress response Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Proteomics Abbreviated Journal J Proteomics  
  Volume 74 Issue 8 Pages 1301-1322  
  Keywords Arabidopsis/genetics; Cold Temperature/adverse effects; Droughts; Gene Expression Profiling; Herbicides/pharmacology; Hot Temperature/adverse effects; Metals, Heavy/adverse effects; Oryza sativa/genetics; Plant Proteins/*genetics; Plants/*genetics; Protein Processing, Post-Translational; Proteome/*genetics; Stress, Physiological/*genetics  
  Abstract Plant acclimation to stress is associated with profound changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. In this review, proteomics studies dealing with plant response to a broad range of abiotic stress factors--cold, heat, drought, waterlogging, salinity, ozone treatment, hypoxia and anoxia, herbicide treatments, inadequate or excessive light conditions, disbalances in mineral nutrition, enhanced concentrations of heavy metals, radioactivity and mechanical wounding are discussed. Most studies have been carried out on model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice due to large protein sequence databases available; however, the variety of plant species used for proteomics analyses is rapidly increasing. Protein response pathways shared by different plant species under various stress conditions (glycolytic pathway, enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, accumulation of LEA proteins) as well as pathways unique to a given stress are discussed. Results from proteomics studies are interpreted with respect to physiological factors determining plant stress response. In conclusion, examples of application of proteomics studies in search for protein markers underlying phenotypic variation in physiological parameters associated with plant stress tolerance are given.  
  Call Number Serial 229  
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