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Author (up) Danyuo, Y.; Obayemi, J.D.; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S.; Ani, C.J.; Odusanya, O.S.; Oni, Y.; Anuku, N.; Malatesta, K.; Soboyejo, W.O. file  url
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  Title Prodigiosin release from an implantable biomedical device: kinetics of localized cancer drug release Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Materials Science & Engineering. C, Materials for Biological Applications Abbreviated Journal Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl  
  Volume 42 Issue Pages 734-745  
  Keywords Acrylic Resins/chemistry; Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry/*pharmacokinetics; Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/instrumentation; Diffusion; Drug Delivery Systems/instrumentation; Drug Liberation; Drug Therapy/*instrumentation; Hydrogels/chemistry; Hyperthermia, Induced; Kinetics; Prodigiosin/chemistry/*pharmacokinetics; *Prostheses and Implants; Biomedical device; Breast cancer; Hyperthermia; Localized chemotherapy; Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide)-based hydrogels; Prodigiosin  
  Abstract This paper presents an implantable encapsulated structure that can deliver localized heating (hyperthermia) and controlled concentrations of prodigiosin (a cancer drug) synthesized by bacteria (Serratia marcesce (subsp. marcescens)). Prototypical Poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) packages, containing well-controlled micro-channels and drug storage compartments, were fabricated along with a drug-storing polymer produced by free radical polymerization of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPA) co-monomers of Acrylamide (AM) and Butyl-methacrylate (BMA). The mechanisms of drug diffusion of PNIPA-base gels were elucidated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was also used to study the heterogeneous porous structure of the PNIPA-based gels. The release exponents, n, of the gels were found to between 0.5 and 0.7. This is in the range expected for Fickian (n=0.5). Deviation from Fickian diffusion was also observed (n>0.5) diffusion. The gel diffusion coefficients were shown to vary between 2.1x10(-12)m(2)/s and 4.8x10(-6)m(2)/s. The implications of the results are then discussed for the localized treatment of cancer via hyperthermia and the controlled delivery of prodigiosin from encapsulated PNIPA-based devices.  
  Call Number Serial 1605  
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Author (up) Lapenda, J.C.; Silva, P.A.; Vicalvi, M.C.; Sena, K.X.F.R.; Nascimento, S.C. file  url
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  Title Antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin isolated from Serratia marcescens UFPEDA 398 Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal World J Microbiol Biotechnol  
  Volume 31 Issue 2 Pages 399-406  
  Keywords Acinetobacter/drug effects; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacteria/*drug effects/growth & development; Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests; Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects; Escherichia coli/drug effects; Prodigiosin/chemistry/*pharmacology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects; Serratia marcescens/*chemistry; Spectrophotometry; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects; Streptococcus pyogenes/drug effects  
  Abstract Prodigiosin is an alkaloid and natural red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens. Prodigiosin has antimicrobial, antimalarial and antitumor properties and induces apoptosis in T and B lymphocytes. These properties have piqued the interest of researchers in the fields of medicine, pharmaceutics and different industries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin against pathogenic micro-organisms. The red pigments produced by S. marcescens exhibited absorption at 534 nm, Rf of 0.59 and molecular weight of 323 m/z. Antimicrobial activity was tested against oxacillin-resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Acinetobacter sp. and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. The standard antibiotics employed were ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin and oxacillin. The disc-diffusion tests demonstrated significant inhibition zones for S. aureus (35 +/- 0.6), E. faecalis (22 +/- 1.0) and S. pyogenes (14 +/- 0.6). However, prodigiosin showed resistance to E. coli, P. aeruginosa and acinetobacter, where no significant formation of inhibitory halos were observed. We determined the inhibitory minimum concentrations and bactericidal for 20 strains of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA). The pattern was the antibiotic oxacillin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations observed ranged from 1, 2 and 4.0 mug/mL, respectively, while the minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged from 2, 4, 8 and 16 mug/mL. The S. marcescens prodigiosin produced by showed bactericidal and bacteriostatic effect showing promising antimicrobial activity and suggesting future studies regarding its applicability in antibiotics therapies directed ORSA.  
  Call Number Serial 1672  
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Author (up) Shrestha, R.; Trauger-Querry, B.; Loughrin, A.; Appleby, B.S. file  url
openurl 
  Title Visual art therapy in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Neurocase Abbreviated Journal Neurocase  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 243-247  
  Keywords Adult; Art Therapy/*methods; Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging/pathology; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome/diagnostic imaging/pathology/*rehabilitation; Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Female; Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/pharmacokinetics; Humans; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Positron-Emission Tomography; Treatment Outcome; Visual Perception/physiology; Prion disease; art therapy; disease progression; patient outcome; sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease  
  Abstract This paper describes the diagnostic and treatment utility of visual art therapy in a case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Visual art therapy was compared longitudinally with clinical and neuroimaging data over five-month period in an autopsy-confirmed case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of MM2-cortical subtype. Art therapy sessions and content were useful in ascertaining neuropsychiatric symptoms during the course of her illness. Art therapy offered a unique emotional and cognitive outlet as illness progressed. Patients and families affected by sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may benefit from art therapy despite the rapidly progressive nature of the illness. Art therapy can also be useful for assessment of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by healthcare professionals.  
  Call Number Serial 2087  
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Author (up) Zamm, A.; Schlaug, G.; Eagleman, D.M.; Loui, P. file  url
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  Title Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication NeuroImage Abbreviated Journal Neuroimage  
  Volume 74 Issue Pages 359-366  
  Keywords Auditory Perception/physiology; Brain/*physiopathology; Color Perception/physiology; Diffusion Tensor Imaging; Female; Humans; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Male; Music; Neural Pathways/*physiopathology; Perceptual Disorders/*physiopathology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations.  
  Call Number Serial 2071  
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Author (up) Zamm, A.; Schlaug, G.; Eagleman, D.M.; Loui, P. file  url
openurl 
  Title Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication NeuroImage Abbreviated Journal Neuroimage  
  Volume 74 Issue Pages 359-366  
  Keywords Auditory Perception/physiology; Brain/*physiopathology; Color Perception/physiology; Diffusion Tensor Imaging; Female; Humans; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Male; Music; Neural Pathways/*physiopathology; Perceptual Disorders/*physiopathology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations.  
  Call Number Serial 2073  
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