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Author (up) Huntjens, P.; Pahl-Wostl, C.; Rihoux, B.; Schlüter, M.; Flachner, Z.; Neto, S.; Koskova, R.; Dickens, C.; Nabide Kiti, I. file  url
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  Title Adaptive Water Management and Policy Learning in a Changing Climate: a Formal Comparative Analysis of Eight Water Management Regimes in Europe, Africa and Asia: Adaptive Water Management and Policy Learning in a Changing Climate Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Environmental Policy and Governance Abbreviated Journal Env. Pol. Gov.  
  Volume 21 Issue 3 Pages 145-163  
  Keywords policy learning; triple loop learning; adaptive and integrated water management; adaptive capacity; river basin management; climate change adaptation strategies; floods; droughts; formal comparative analysis; multi-value qualitative comparative analysis (mvQCA); complex adaptive systems  
  Abstract This article provides an evidence-based and policy-relevant contribution to understanding the phenomenon of policy learning and its structural constraints in the field of river basin management, in particular related to coping with current and future climatic hazards such as floods and droughts. This has been done by a formal comparative analysis of eight water management regimes, by using multi-value qualitative comparative analysis, focusing on the relationship between regime characteristics (as explanatory variables) and different levels of policy learning (as output value). This research has revealed the importance of the socio-cognitive dimension, as an essential emerging property of complex adaptive governance systems. This socio-cognitive dimension depends on a specific set of structural conditions; in particular, better integrated cooperation structures in combination with advanced information management are the key factors leading towards higher levels of policy learning. Furthermore, this research highlights a number of significant positive correlations between different regime elements, thereby identifying a stabilizing mechanism in current management regimes, and this research also highlights the necessity of fine-tuning centralized control with bottom-up approaches. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.  
  Call Number Serial 640  
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Author (up) Kosova, K.; Vitamvas, P.; Prasil, I.T.; Renaut, J. file  url
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  Title Plant proteome changes under abiotic stress--contribution of proteomics studies to understanding plant stress response Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Proteomics Abbreviated Journal J Proteomics  
  Volume 74 Issue 8 Pages 1301-1322  
  Keywords Arabidopsis/genetics; Cold Temperature/adverse effects; Droughts; Gene Expression Profiling; Herbicides/pharmacology; Hot Temperature/adverse effects; Metals, Heavy/adverse effects; Oryza sativa/genetics; Plant Proteins/*genetics; Plants/*genetics; Protein Processing, Post-Translational; Proteome/*genetics; Stress, Physiological/*genetics  
  Abstract Plant acclimation to stress is associated with profound changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. In this review, proteomics studies dealing with plant response to a broad range of abiotic stress factors--cold, heat, drought, waterlogging, salinity, ozone treatment, hypoxia and anoxia, herbicide treatments, inadequate or excessive light conditions, disbalances in mineral nutrition, enhanced concentrations of heavy metals, radioactivity and mechanical wounding are discussed. Most studies have been carried out on model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice due to large protein sequence databases available; however, the variety of plant species used for proteomics analyses is rapidly increasing. Protein response pathways shared by different plant species under various stress conditions (glycolytic pathway, enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, accumulation of LEA proteins) as well as pathways unique to a given stress are discussed. Results from proteomics studies are interpreted with respect to physiological factors determining plant stress response. In conclusion, examples of application of proteomics studies in search for protein markers underlying phenotypic variation in physiological parameters associated with plant stress tolerance are given.  
  Call Number Serial 229  
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Author (up) Oraby, H.; Ahmad, R. file  url
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  Title Physiological and biochemical changes of CBF3 transgenic oat in response to salinity stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Plant Science : an International Journal of Experimental Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Plant Sci  
  Volume 185-186 Issue Pages 331-339  
  Keywords Arabidopsis--genetics; Arabidopsis Proteins--genetics, metabolism; Avena sativa--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Biomass; Droughts; Gene Expression; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant--physiology; Photosynthesis--drug effects; Plant Leaves--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Plant Proteins--genetics, metabolism; Plant Roots--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Plant Shoots--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Plant Transpiration--drug effects; Plants, Genetically Modified; Promoter Regions, Genetic--genetics; Salinity; Seedling--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Sodium Chloride--pharmacology; Stress, Physiological--physiology; Transcription Factors--genetics, metabolism  
  Abstract Salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting oat productivity. Several physiological and biochemical traits have been found to be related to yield maintenance under salinity. The impact of introducing the Arabidopsis CBF3 gene controlled by the rd29A stress-inducible promoter in T(2) transgenic oat on salinity tolerance and associated physiological changes were studied. Compared with the non-transgenic control, transgenic T(2) plants exhibited greater growth and showed significant maintenance of leaf area, relative water content, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic and transpiration rates as well as increased levels of proline and soluble sugars under high salt stress. These physiological changes delayed leaf-wilting symptoms, increased tolerance and reduced yield loss. At a salinity stress level of 100mM, the CBF3-overexpressing transgenic oat showed a yield loss of 4-11% compared with >56% for the non-transgenic control. These results demonstrate that stress-inducible over-expression of CBF3 may have the potential to enhance abiotic stress tolerance in oat.  
  Call Number Serial 238  
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