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Author (up) Fawcett, J. file  url
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  Title Targeting treatment in patients with mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression Type Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychiatry  
  Volume 51 Suppl Issue Pages 40-43  
  Keywords Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use; Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology/*therapy; Clinical Trials as Topic; Comorbidity; Depressive Disorder/epidemiology/*therapy; Drug Therapy, Combination; Humans; Panic; Risk Factors; Suicide/psychology  
  Abstract Patients with major depression often exhibit clinical anxiety. Although not included among DSM-III-R criteria for major depression, clinical anxiety may be the most important symptom to assess in planning the treatment for this affective disorder. By actively treating the anxiety component, psychiatrists can modify serious suicide risk factors in some patients and provide the immediate benefits that will induce others to comply with antidepressant therapy.  
  Call Number Serial 210  
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Author (up) Gale, E.A. file  url
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  Title Lessons from the glitazones: a story of drug development Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Lancet Abbreviated Journal Lancet  
  Volume 357 Issue 9271 Pages 1870-1875  
  Keywords Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems; Chromans/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*drug therapy; Drug Approval/*legislation & jurisprudence; Drug Therapy, Combination; Drug-Induced Liver Injury/etiology; Europe; Humans; Hypoglycemic Agents/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; Liver Failure/chemically induced; Thiazoles/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; *Thiazolidinediones; United States  
  Abstract Troglitazone, the first in the thiazolidinedione class of oral hypoglycaemic agents, was launched in the USA in March, 1997. It reached Europe later that year, only to be withdrawn within weeks on the grounds of liver toxicity. Meanwhile it went on to generate sales of over $2 billion in the USA, and caused at least 90 cases of liver failure (70 resulting in death or transplantation) before it was withdrawn in March, 2000. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone reached the US market in 1999 as first-line agents to be used alone or in combination with other drugs, but in Europe the same dossiers were used one year later to apply for a limited licence as second-line agents restricted to oral combination therapy. How should we use the glitazones? And how did they achieve blockbuster status without any clear evidence of advantage over existing therapy?  
  Call Number Serial 921  
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Author (up) Zarate, C.A.J.; Quiroz, J.A.; Singh, J.B.; Denicoff, K.D.; De Jesus, G.; Luckenbaugh, D.A.; Charney, D.S.; Manji, H.K. file  url
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  Title An open-label trial of the glutamate-modulating agent riluzole in combination with lithium for the treatment of bipolar depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Biological Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Biol Psychiatry  
  Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 430-432  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Bipolar Disorder/*drug therapy; Drug Therapy, Combination; Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Lithium/*therapeutic use; Male; Middle Aged; Personality Inventory; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Riluzole/*therapeutic use; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Preclinical and clinical evidence indicate that the glutamatergic system might play a role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of riluzole, a glutamate-modulating agent, in bipolar depression. METHODS: This was an 8-week add-on study of riluzole in combination with lithium in acutely depressed bipolar patients aged 18 years and older. After open treatment with lithium for a minimum period of 4 weeks, subjects who continued to have a Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score of >/=20 received riluzole (50-200 mg/day) for 8 weeks. RESULTS: Fourteen bipolar depressed patients entered the study. The linear mixed models for total MADRS score showed a significant treatment effect. No switch into hypomania or mania was observed. Overall, riluzole was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Although preliminary, these results suggest that riluzole might indeed have antidepressant efficacy in subjects with bipolar depression.  
  Call Number Serial 1019  
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