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Author (up) Feng, L.; Chiam, P.C.; Kua, E.-H.; Ng, T.P. file  url
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  Title Use of complementary and alternative medicines and mental disorders in community-living Asian older adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gerontol Geriatr  
  Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 243-249  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Asian Continental Ancestry Group; Attitude to Health/*ethnology; Complementary Therapies/*utilization; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/therapy; Drug Utilization; *Drugs, Chinese Herbal; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Mental Disorders/*therapy; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Patient Acceptance of Health Care; Singapore  
  Abstract The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) and its link with mental health is poorly understood. It is not clear whether mentally ill persons use CAM because conventional medical care does not meet their needs. In a nationally representative random sample of 1092 individuals aged 60 in Singapore, we determined CAM use and the prevalence of mental disorders using Geriatric Mental State (GMS) and found that overall CAM use, predominantly Chinese herbal medicines, was reported by an estimated 42.7% of the population. Depression (odds ratio=OR=1.94; 95% CI=1.26-2.98) and poor self-rated mental health (OR=2.44; 95% CI=1.25-4.80) were associated with CAM use, independently of other risks factors and correlates of CAM use. Although depressed Asians more frequently used CAM than conventional health care, we could find no evidence in this study to indicate that among individuals with depression, CAM users compared to nonusers, were less likely to seek treatment from general and mental health professionals or were more likely to have negative beliefs and attitudes about mental illnesses and its treatment. This is consistent with the common observation that the use of CAM complements rather than replaces conventional treatments.  
  Call Number Serial 1347  
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Author (up) Teuber, M. file  url
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  Title Veterinary use and antibiotic resistance Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Current Opinion in Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Curr Opin Microbiol  
  Volume 4 Issue 5 Pages 493-499  
  Keywords Agriculture; Animals; *Animals, Domestic; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Bacteria/*drug effects; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Drug Utilization; Humans; *Veterinary Drugs; *Veterinary Medicine  
  Abstract Globally, an estimated 50% of all antimicrobials serve veterinary purposes. Bacteria that inevitably develop antibiotic resistance in animals comprise food-borne pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and commensal bacteria. The same antibiotic resistance genes and gene transfer mechanisms can be found in the microfloras of animals and humans. Direct contact, food and water link animal and human habitats. The accumulation of resistant bacteria by the use of antibiotics in agriculture and veterinary medicine and the spread of such bacteria via agriculture and direct contamination are documented.  
  Call Number Serial 1671  
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