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Author (up) Ambrosone, A.; Costa, A.; Leone, A.; Grillo, S. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Beyond transcription: RNA-binding proteins as emerging regulators of plant response to environmental constraints Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Plant Science : an International Journal of Experimental Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Plant Sci  
  Volume 182 Issue Pages 12-18  
  Keywords Abscisic Acid/metabolism; Acclimatization/*physiology; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; Osmotic Pressure/physiology; *Plant Physiological Processes; Plants/genetics; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism/*physiology; Transcription, Genetic  
  Abstract RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) govern many aspects of RNA metabolism, including pre-mRNA processing, transport, stability/decay and translation. Although relatively few plant RNA-binding proteins have been characterized genetically and biochemically, more than 200 RBP genes have been predicted in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, suggesting that they might serve specific plant functions. Besides their role in normal cellular functions, RBPs are emerging also as an interesting class of proteins involved in a wide range of post-transcriptional regulatory events that are important in providing plants with the ability to respond rapidly to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we review the most recent results and evidence on the functional role of RBPs in plant adaptation to various unfavourable environmental conditions and their contribution to enhance plant tolerance to abiotic stresses, with special emphasis on osmotic and temperature stress.  
  Call Number Serial 1226  
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Author (up) Law, R.D.; Crafts-Brandner, S.J. file  url
openurl 
  Title High temperature stress increases the expression of wheat leaf ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase protein Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics Abbreviated Journal Arch Biochem Biophys  
  Volume 386 Issue 2 Pages 261-267  
  Keywords Blotting, Southern; Blotting, Western; Enzyme Induction; *Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; Isoenzymes/biosynthesis/chemistry/genetics/metabolism; Molecular Weight; Plant Diseases; Plant Leaves/*enzymology/genetics; Plant Proteins/*biosynthesis/chemistry/genetics; Protein Subunits; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism; RNA, Plant/genetics/metabolism; Ribulose-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/biosynthesis/chemistry/genetics; Temperature; Time Factors; Triticum/*enzymology/genetics  
  Abstract The effect of high temperature stress on the expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase was examined in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves, which normally possess 46- and 42-kDa activase forms. Heat stress at 38 degrees C significantly reduced total activase mRNA levels compared to controls, and recovery of activase transcription was only marginal 24 h after alleviating heat stress. In contrast to transcript abundance, immunoblot analysis indicated that heat stress increased the accumulation of the 42-kDa activase and induced a putative 41-kDa form. Heat stress did not affect the amounts of the 46- and 42-kDa activase forms (present as 51- and 45-kDa preproteins) recovered after their immunoprecipitation from in vitro translation products. De novo protein synthesis in vivo in the presence of [35S]Met/Cys showed an increase in the amount of newly synthesized 42-kDa subunit after 4 h of heat stress, and synthesis of the putative 41-kDa activase was apparent. In contrast to activase, heat stress led to a rapid and large reduction in the de novo synthesis of the large and small subunits of Rubisco. Long-term (48-h) heat stress further increased the amounts of de novo synthesized 42- and 41-kDa activase forms. After 24 h of recovery from heat stress, de novo synthesis of the 42-kDa activase returned to control levels, while a small amount of 41-kDa protein was still expressed. Southern analysis suggested the presence of a single activase gene. These results indicate that heat stress alters activase expression, most likely posttranscriptionally, and suggest that the heat-induced expression of the 42- and 41-kDa subunits of wheat leaf Rubisco activase may be related to the maintenance and acclimation of photosynthetic CO2 fixation during high temperature stress in wheat.  
  Call Number Serial 1802  
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Author (up) Liu, P.F.; Wang, Y.K.; Chang, W.C.; Chang, H.Y.; Pan, R.L. file  url
openurl 
  Title Regulation of Arabidopsis thaliana Ku genes at different developmental stages under heat stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Biochimica et Biophysica Acta Abbreviated Journal Biochim Biophys Acta  
  Volume 1779 Issue 6-7 Pages 402-407  
  Keywords Arabidopsis/*genetics/*growth & development/metabolism; Arabidopsis Proteins/*genetics; Base Sequence; DNA Helicases/*genetics; DNA Primers/genetics; DNA, Plant/genetics; DNA-Binding Proteins/*genetics; Down-Regulation; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; *Genes, Plant; Hot Temperature; Mutation; Plants, Genetically Modified; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Signal Transduction; Sulfurtransferases/genetics; Tissue Distribution  
  Abstract Ku, a heterodimeric protein consisting of 70- and 80-kDa subunits, is involved in many cellular processes, such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and heat shock response. Moreover, the expression of Arabidopsis thaliana Ku genes (AtKu) is modulated by certain plant hormones through several signal transduction pathways. This study investigated how AtKu are regulated by heat stress. AtKu expression in 3-week-old young seedlings was down-regulated by heat stress in a time-dependent manner, as examined using real-time quantitative PCR, GUS reporter systems, and western blotting analysis. Additionally, the heat-induced repression of AtKu was mediated through the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthetic pathway, as shown by the reversal of AtKu suppression in the ABA biosynthesis mutant, aba3, and by an increase in the ABA level as analyzed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Heat stress-induced regulation of AtKu repression also involved ethylene signaling, DNA repair pathways, and fatty acid synthesis. Furthermore, AtKu expression was repressed in stems, rosette leaves, and cauline leaves in 4-5-week-old plants under heat stress, whereas it remained unchanged in roots and primary inflorescence, indicating that heat differentially modulated AtKu expression in distinct tissues of Arabidopsis.  
  Call Number Serial 485  
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Author (up) Lorkovic, Z.J. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Role of plant RNA-binding proteins in development, stress response and genome organization Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Trends in Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Trends Plant Sci  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 229-236  
  Keywords Arabidopsis/genetics/growth & development/*metabolism; Arabidopsis Proteins/genetics/*metabolism/physiology; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/drug effects; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant/drug effects; *Genome, Plant; Models, Biological; Protein Binding; RNA Precursors/genetics/metabolism; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/*metabolism/physiology; Sodium Chloride/pharmacology  
  Abstract RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in eukaryotes have crucial roles in all aspects of post-transcriptional gene regulation. They are important governors of diverse developmental processes by modulating expression of specific transcripts. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encodes for more than 200 different RBPs, most of which are plant specific and are therefore likely to perform plant-specific functions. Indeed, recent identification and analysis of plant RBPs clearly showed that, in addition to the important role in diverse developmental processes, they are also involved in adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. Clearly, they act by regulating pre-mRNA splicing, polyadenylation, RNA stability and RNA export, as well as by influencing chromatin modification.  
  Call Number Serial 1147  
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Author (up) Oraby, H.; Ahmad, R. file  url
openurl 
  Title Physiological and biochemical changes of CBF3 transgenic oat in response to salinity stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Plant Science : an International Journal of Experimental Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Plant Sci  
  Volume 185-186 Issue Pages 331-339  
  Keywords Arabidopsis--genetics; Arabidopsis Proteins--genetics, metabolism; Avena sativa--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Biomass; Droughts; Gene Expression; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant--physiology; Photosynthesis--drug effects; Plant Leaves--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Plant Proteins--genetics, metabolism; Plant Roots--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Plant Shoots--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Plant Transpiration--drug effects; Plants, Genetically Modified; Promoter Regions, Genetic--genetics; Salinity; Seedling--drug effects, genetics, growth & development, physiology; Sodium Chloride--pharmacology; Stress, Physiological--physiology; Transcription Factors--genetics, metabolism  
  Abstract Salinity is a major abiotic constraint affecting oat productivity. Several physiological and biochemical traits have been found to be related to yield maintenance under salinity. The impact of introducing the Arabidopsis CBF3 gene controlled by the rd29A stress-inducible promoter in T(2) transgenic oat on salinity tolerance and associated physiological changes were studied. Compared with the non-transgenic control, transgenic T(2) plants exhibited greater growth and showed significant maintenance of leaf area, relative water content, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic and transpiration rates as well as increased levels of proline and soluble sugars under high salt stress. These physiological changes delayed leaf-wilting symptoms, increased tolerance and reduced yield loss. At a salinity stress level of 100mM, the CBF3-overexpressing transgenic oat showed a yield loss of 4-11% compared with >56% for the non-transgenic control. These results demonstrate that stress-inducible over-expression of CBF3 may have the potential to enhance abiotic stress tolerance in oat.  
  Call Number Serial 238  
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