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Author (up) Aveskamp, M.M.; Verkley, G.J.M.; de Gruyter, J.; Murace, M.A.; Perello, A.; Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W. file  url
openurl 
  Title DNA phylogeny reveals polyphyly of Phoma section Peyronellaea and multiple taxonomic novelties Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Mycologia Abbreviated Journal Mycologia  
  Volume 101 Issue 3 Pages 363-382  
  Keywords Actins/analysis/genetics; Ascomycota/*classification/cytology/genetics; Biodiversity; DNA, Fungal/*analysis/genetics; DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/analysis/genetics; Genetic Speciation; Genetic Variation; Molecular Sequence Data; *Phylogeny; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Sequence Alignment; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Species Specificity; Tubulin/analysis/genetics  
  Abstract Species of the anamorph genus Phoma are commonly isolated from a wide range of ecological niches. They are notoriously difficult to identify due to the paucity of morphological features and the plasticity of these when cultivated on agar media. Species linked to Phoma section Peyronellaea are typified by the production of dictyochlamydospores and thus have additional characters to use in taxon delineation. However, the taxonomy of this section is still not fully understood. Furthermore the production of such chlamydospores also is known in some other sections of Phoma. DNA sequences were generated from three loci, namely ITS, actin, and 3-tubulin, to clarify the phylogeny of Phoma taxa that produce dictyochlamydospores. Results were unable to support section Peyronellaea as a taxonomic entity. Dictyochlamydospore formation appears to be a feature that developed, or was lost, many times during the evolution of Phoma. Furthermore, based on the multigene analyses, five new Phoma species could be delineated while a further five required taxonomic revision to be consistent with the genetic variation observed.  
  Call Number Serial 1999  
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Author (up) Bakker, T.C.M.; Pomiankowski, A. file  url
openurl 
  Title The genetic basis of female mate preferences Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Journal of Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal J Evolution Biol  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 129-171  
  Keywords Callosobruchus maculatus; Genetic variation; Mate preferences; Female; Male; Beetle  
  Abstract We review the evidence for genetic variation in female and male mate preferences. Genetic differences between species and partially isolated races show that preferences can evolve and were genetically variable in the past. Within populations there is good evidence of genetic variation, both of discrete genetic effects (8 cases) and quantitative genetic effects (17 cases), from a diverse range of taxa. We also review evidence for the presence of genetic covariance between mate preferences and sexual traits in the other sex. The 11 studies go a long way to validating the theoretical prediction of positive genetic covariance. The few negative results are best explained by a lack of appropriate experimental design. One unresolved question is whether genetic covariance is due to linkage disequilibrium between unlinked genes or physical linkage. Some evidence points to linkage disequilibrium but this is not yet conclusive.  
  Call Number Serial 1694  
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Author (up) Delattre, M.; Felix, M.A. file  url
openurl 
  Title Microevolutionary studies in nematodes: a beginning Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication BioEssays : News and Reviews in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Abbreviated Journal Bioessays  
  Volume 23 Issue 9 Pages 807-819  
  Keywords Animals; *Biological Evolution; Caenorhabditis elegans/genetics; Drosophila/genetics; Genetic Techniques; Genetic Variation; Genotype; Mutagenesis; Nematoda/*classification/*genetics; *Polymorphism, Genetic  
  Abstract Comparisons between related species often allow the detailed genetic analysis of evolutionary processes. Here we advocate the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (and several other rhabditid species) as model systems for microevolutionary studies. Compared to Drosophila species, which have been a mainstay of such studies, C. elegans has a self-fertilizing mode of reproduction, a shorter life cycle and a convenient cell-level analysis of phenotypic variation. Data concerning its population genetics and ecology are still scarce, however. We review molecular, behavioral and developmental intraspecific polymorphisms for populations of C. elegans, Oscheius sp. 1 and Pristionchus pacificus. Focusing on vulval development, which has been well characterized in several species, we discuss relationships between patterns of variations: (1) for a given genotype (developmental variants), (2) after mutagenesis (mutability), (3) in different populations of the same species (polymorphisms) and (4) between closely related species. These studies have revealed that evolutionary variations between sister species affect those characters that show phenotypic developmental variants, that are mutable and that are polymorphic within species.  
  Call Number Serial 1024  
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Author (up) Finkel, S.E. file  url
openurl 
  Title Long-term survival during stationary phase: evolution and the GASP phenotype Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Nature Reviews. Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Microbiol  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 113-120  
  Keywords Bacteria/*genetics/*growth & development; *Evolution, Molecular; Genetic Variation; Mutation; Phenotype; SOS Response (Genetics); Selection, Genetic  
  Abstract The traditional view of the stationary phase of the bacterial life cycle, obtained using standard laboratory culture practices, although useful, might not always provide us with the complete picture. Here, the traditional three phases of the bacterial life cycle are expanded to include two additional phases: death phase and long-term stationary phase. In many natural environments, bacteria probably exist in conditions more akin to those of long-term stationary-phase cultures, in which the expression of a wide variety of stress-response genes and alternative metabolic pathways is essential for survival. Furthermore, stressful environments can result in selection for mutants that express the growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype.  
  Call Number Serial 1555  
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Author (up) Finkel, S.E. file  url
openurl 
  Title Long-term survival during stationary phase: evolution and the GASP phenotype Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Nature Reviews. Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Microbiol  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 113-120  
  Keywords Bacteria/*genetics/*growth & development; *Evolution, Molecular; Genetic Variation; Mutation; Phenotype; SOS Response (Genetics); Selection, Genetic  
  Abstract The traditional view of the stationary phase of the bacterial life cycle, obtained using standard laboratory culture practices, although useful, might not always provide us with the complete picture. Here, the traditional three phases of the bacterial life cycle are expanded to include two additional phases: death phase and long-term stationary phase. In many natural environments, bacteria probably exist in conditions more akin to those of long-term stationary-phase cultures, in which the expression of a wide variety of stress-response genes and alternative metabolic pathways is essential for survival. Furthermore, stressful environments can result in selection for mutants that express the growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype.  
  Call Number Serial 1581  
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