more information
Search within Results:

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Coutts, A.J.; Rampinini, E.; Marcora, S.M.; Castagna, C.; Impellizzeri, F.M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Heart rate and blood lactate correlates of perceived exertion during small-sided soccer games Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport / Sports Medicine Australia Abbreviated Journal J Sci Med Sport  
  Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 79-84  
  Keywords Adult; Exercise/physiology; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Lactic Acid/*blood; Linear Models; Muscle Fatigue/physiology; Oxygen Consumption/physiology; Perception/*physiology; Physical Exertion/*physiology; Self-Assessment; Soccer/*physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract The rating of perceived exertion (RPE) could be a practical measure of global exercise intensity in team sports. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between heart rate (%HR(peak)) and blood lactate ([BLa(-)]) measures of exercise intensity with each player's RPE during soccer-specific aerobic exercises. Mean individual %HR(peak), [BLa(-)] and RPE (Borg's CR 10-scale) were recorded from 20 amateur soccer players from 67 soccer-specific small-sided games training sessions over an entire competitive season. The small-sided games were performed in three 4min bouts separated with 3min recovery on various sized pitches and involved 3-, 4-, 5-, or 6-players on each side. A stepwise linear multiple regression was used to determine a predictive equation to estimate global RPE for small-sided games from [BLa(-)] and %HR(peak). Partial correlation coefficients were also calculated to assess the relationship between RPE, [BLa(-)] and %HR(peak). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that 43.1% of the adjusted variance in RPE could be explained by HR alone. The addition of [BLa(-)] data to the prediction equation allowed for 57.8% of the adjusted variance in RPE to be predicted (Y=-9.49-0.152 %HR(peak)+1.82 [BLa(-)], p<0.001). These results show that the combination of [BLa(-)] and %HR(peak) measures during small-sided games is better related to RPE than either %HR(peak) or [BLa(-)] measures alone. These results provide further support the use of RPE as a measure of global exercise intensity in soccer.  
  Call Number Serial 523  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Elaad, E.; Ben-Shakhar, G. file  url
openurl 
  Title Finger pulse waveform length in the detection of concealed information Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Psychophysiol  
  Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 226-234  
  Keywords Adult; Arousal/*physiology; Attention/*physiology; Autonomic Nervous System/physiology; Female; Galvanic Skin Response/*physiology; *Guilt; Habituation, Psychophysiologic/physiology; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Lie Detection/*psychology; Male; Mathematical Computing; Orientation/physiology; Plethysmography/statistics & numerical data; Problem Solving/*physiology; Pulse/*statistics & numerical data; Reference Values; *Respiration; Sensitivity and Specificity; Theft/*psychology  
  Abstract An attempt was made to assess the efficiency of the finger pulse waveform length (FPWL), in detection of concealed information. For this purpose, two mock-theft experiments were designed. In the first, 40 guilty participants were examined while electrodermal, respiration and finger pulse volume were recorded. Results showed that detection accuracy with the FPWL was at least as good as the accuracy obtained with the other two measures (respiration changes and skin conductance responses). Detection efficiency was further improved when a combination of FPWL with the other two measures was used. In the second experiment, 39 guilty and 23 innocent participants were instructed to deny knowledge while the transducers were not attached to them. Then, the same questions were repeated while electrodermal, respiration and finger pulse volume were recorded. Results showed reduced rates of identification compared to the first experiment, which were explained by habituation. However, finger pulse was less affected by habituation than both respiration and skin conductance. Results suggested that the FPWL might be a useful addition to the existing measures in the detection of concealed information.  
  Call Number Serial 1443  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Gamer, M.; Verschuere, B.; Crombez, G.; Vossel, G. file  url
openurl 
  Title Combining physiological measures in the detection of concealed information Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 95 Issue 3 Pages 333-340  
  Keywords Adult; Galvanic Skin Response/*physiology; Guilt; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Lie Detection/*psychology; Male; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Regression Analysis; Respiratory Mechanics/*physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Meta-analytic research has confirmed that skin conductance response (SCR) measures have high validity for the detection of concealed information. Furthermore, cumulating research has provided evidence for the validity of two other autonomic measures: Heart rate (HR) and Respiration Line Length (RLL). In the present report, we compared SCR detection efficiency with HR and RLL, and investigated whether HR and RLL provide incremental validity to electrodermal responses. Analyses were based on data from 7 different samples covering 275 guilty and 53 innocent examinees. Results revealed that the area under the ROC curve was significantly higher for SCR than for HR and RLL. A weighted combination of these measures using a logistic regression model yielded slightly larger validity coefficients than the best single measure. These results proved to be stable across different protocols and various samples.  
  Call Number Serial 1444  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Nephew, B.C.; Kahn, S.A.; Romero, L.M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Heart rate and behavior are regulated independently of corticosterone following diverse acute stressors Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication General and Comparative Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Gen Comp Endocrinol  
  Volume 133 Issue 2 Pages 173-180  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Corticosterone/*physiology; Female; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Light; Male; Noise; Sex Characteristics; Songbirds/*physiology; *Stress, Physiological  
  Abstract Captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were subjected to five acute stressors: a visual stressor (strobe light), an auditory stressor (music), and disturbance by three different humans; their accustomed caretaker, an antagonist (the experimenter), and a novel human. Heart rate (HR), behavioral, and corticosterone (CORT) responses to each stressor were simultaneously recorded. The visual stressor elicited a significantly lower maximal HR response [approximately 550 beats per minute (bpm)] that returned to basal levels (335 bpm) more quickly than the HR increases elicited by any of the four other stressors (approximately 700 bpm). These data suggest that the degree of novelty may alter the magnitude and duration of the HR response. Behaviorally, both the auditory stressor and the human antagonist caused a significant decrease in preening behavior without subsequent increases in activity, beak wiping (a behavioral indicator of displaced aggression), or bouts of feeding and/or drinking. In contrast to the stressor-specific differences in HR and behavior, all five acute stressors elicited similar sub-maximal CORT responses, suggesting the presence of a standardized CORT response to sudden, acute stimuli in wild captive starlings. The data indicate that starlings modulate HR, CORT, and behavioral responses depending upon the stressor, but that these three pathways are regulated independently.  
  Call Number Serial 1216  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations: