more information
Search within Results:

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (down) Zhou, Y.; Yang, W.; Kirberger, M.; Lee, H.-W.; Ayalasomayajula, G.; Yang, J.J. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Prediction of EF-hand calcium-binding proteins and analysis of bacterial EF-hand proteins Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Proteins Abbreviated Journal Proteins  
  Volume 65 Issue 3 Pages 643-655  
  Keywords Amino Acid Motifs; Amino Acid Sequence; Animals; Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism; Calcium-Binding Proteins/*chemistry; *EF Hand Motifs/genetics; Evolution, Molecular; Humans; Models, Molecular; Molecular Sequence Data; Phylogeny; Sequence Alignment  
  Abstract The EF-hand protein with a helix-loop-helix Ca(2+) binding motif constitutes one of the largest protein families and is involved in numerous biological processes. To facilitate the understanding of the role of Ca(2+) in biological systems using genomic information, we report, herein, our improvement on the pattern search method for the identification of EF-hand and EF-like Ca(2+)-binding proteins. The canonical EF-hand patterns are modified to cater to different flanking structural elements. In addition, on the basis of the conserved sequence of both the N- and C-terminal EF-hands within S100 and S100-like proteins, a new signature profile has been established to allow for the identification of pseudo EF-hand and S100 proteins from genomic information. The new patterns have a positive predictive value of 99% and a sensitivity of 96% for pseudo EF-hands. Furthermore, using the developed patterns, we have identified zero pseudo EF-hand motif and 467 canonical EF-hand Ca(2+) binding motifs with diverse cellular functions in the bacteria genome. The prediction results imply that pseudo EF-hand motifs are phylogenetically younger than canonical EF-hand motifs. Our prediction of Ca(2+) binding motifs provides not only an insight into the role of Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-binding proteins in bacterial systems, but also a way to explore and define the role of Ca(2+) in other biological systems (calciomics).  
  Call Number Serial 415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhang, S.-Y.; Jouanguy, E.; Ugolini, S.; Smahi, A.; Elain, G.; Romero, P.; Segal, D.; Sancho-Shimizu, V.; Lorenzo, L.; Puel, A.; Picard, C.; Chapgier, A.; Plancoulaine, S.; Titeux, M.; Cognet, C.; von Bernuth, H.; Ku, C.-L.; Casrouge, A.; Zhang, X.-X.; Barreiro, L.; Leonard, J.; Hamilton, C.; Lebon, P.; Heron, B.; Vallee, L.; Quintana-Murci, L.; Hovnanian, A.; Rozenberg, F.; Vivier, E.; Geissmann, F.; Tardieu, M.; Abel, L.; Casanova, J.-L. file  url
openurl 
  Title TLR3 deficiency in patients with herpes simplex encephalitis Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 317 Issue 5844 Pages 1522-1527  
  Keywords Alleles; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology; Cell Line; Child, Preschool; Dendritic Cells/immunology; Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex/*genetics/*immunology; Female; Fibroblasts/immunology/metabolism/virology; Genes, Dominant; *Herpesvirus 1, Human/physiology; Heterozygote; Humans; Immunity, Innate; Infant; Interferons/biosynthesis; Keratinocytes/immunology; Killer Cells, Natural/immunology; Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology; Mutation; Poly I-C/pharmacology; Toll-Like Receptor 3/chemistry/*deficiency/*genetics/physiology  
  Abstract Some Toll and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) provide immunity to experimental infections in animal models, but their contribution to host defense in natural ecosystems is unknown. We report a dominant-negative TLR3 allele in otherwise healthy children with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis. TLR3 is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), where it is required to control HSV-1, which spreads from the epithelium to the CNS via cranial nerves. TLR3 is also expressed in epithelial and dendritic cells, which apparently use TLR3-independent pathways to prevent further dissemination of HSV-1 and to provide resistance to other pathogens in TLR3-deficient patients. Human TLR3 appears to be redundant in host defense to most microbes but is vital for natural immunity to HSV-1 in the CNS, which suggests that neurotropic viruses have contributed to the evolutionary maintenance of TLR3.  
  Call Number Serial 1730  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zhan, Q.; Fan, S.; Bae, I.; Guillouf, C.; Liebermann, D.A.; O'Connor, P.M.; Fornace, A.J.J. file  url
openurl 
  Title Induction of bax by genotoxic stress in human cells correlates with normal p53 status and apoptosis Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Oncogene Abbreviated Journal Oncogene  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages 3743-3751  
  Keywords Apoptosis/*genetics; Gene Expression Regulation/*drug effects/genetics/radiation effects; *Genes, p53; Humans; Mutagens/*toxicity; Neoplasms/genetics; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/*genetics; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2; Tumor Cells, Cultured; bcl-2-Associated X Protein  
  Abstract DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation (IR) activate the tumor suppressor p53 and in some cases can cause apoptosis. M1 cells, which do not express the endogenous tumor suppressor gene p53, undergo apoptosis following activation of a temperature sensitive p53 transgene, where it has been shown that bax, an important mediator of apoptosis, is a p53 target gene (Selvakumaran et al, Oncogene 9, 1791-8, 1994). Since p53 can function as a transcription factor after activation by IR, the genetic response to this stress was examined in a panel of human cells with defined p53 status. Like the p53-regulated gene gadd45, bax was rapidly induced, as measured by increased mRNA levels, in the p53 wt (wild type) human myeloid line ML-1, and it was not induced in cells lacking functional p53. However, unlike other p53-regulated genes, bax was only induced in p53 wt cells in which IR also triggered apoptosis. In the case of bcl2, which opposes bax function, mRNA levels were reduced in ML-1 cells after IR. Thus, bax appears to be an unique p53-regulated gene in that its induction by IR not only requires functional p53 but also requires that the cells be apoptosis “proficient.”  
  Call Number Serial 2172  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zellner, D.A.; Siemers, E.; Teran, V.; Conroy, R.; Lankford, M.; Agrafiotis, A.; Ambrose, L.; Locher, P. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Neatness counts. How plating affects liking for the taste of food Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 642-648  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Choice Behavior; Emotions; Female; *Food Habits; *Food Preferences; Humans; Male; Pilot Projects; *Taste; *Visual Perception; Young Adult  
  Abstract Two studies investigated the effect that the arrangement of food on a plate has on liking for the flavor of the food. Food presented in a neatly arranged presentation is liked more than the same food presented in a messy manner. A third study found that subjects expected to like the food in the neat presentations more than in the messy ones and would be willing to pay more for them. They also indicated that the food in the neat presentations came from a higher quality restaurant and that more care was taken with its preparation than the food in the messy presentations. Only the animal-based food was judged as being more contaminated when presented in a messy rather than a neat way. Neatness of the food presentation increases liking for the taste of the food by suggesting greater care on the part of the preparer. Two mechanisms by which greater care might increase liking are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 153  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zarate, C.A.J.; Quiroz, J.A.; Singh, J.B.; Denicoff, K.D.; De Jesus, G.; Luckenbaugh, D.A.; Charney, D.S.; Manji, H.K. file  url
openurl 
  Title An open-label trial of the glutamate-modulating agent riluzole in combination with lithium for the treatment of bipolar depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Biological Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Biol Psychiatry  
  Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 430-432  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Bipolar Disorder/*drug therapy; Drug Therapy, Combination; Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists/*therapeutic use; Female; Humans; Lithium/*therapeutic use; Male; Middle Aged; Personality Inventory; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Riluzole/*therapeutic use; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Preclinical and clinical evidence indicate that the glutamatergic system might play a role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of riluzole, a glutamate-modulating agent, in bipolar depression. METHODS: This was an 8-week add-on study of riluzole in combination with lithium in acutely depressed bipolar patients aged 18 years and older. After open treatment with lithium for a minimum period of 4 weeks, subjects who continued to have a Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score of >/=20 received riluzole (50-200 mg/day) for 8 weeks. RESULTS: Fourteen bipolar depressed patients entered the study. The linear mixed models for total MADRS score showed a significant treatment effect. No switch into hypomania or mania was observed. Overall, riluzole was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: Although preliminary, these results suggest that riluzole might indeed have antidepressant efficacy in subjects with bipolar depression.  
  Call Number Serial 1019  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zamm, A.; Schlaug, G.; Eagleman, D.M.; Loui, P. file  url
openurl 
  Title Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication NeuroImage Abbreviated Journal Neuroimage  
  Volume 74 Issue Pages 359-366  
  Keywords Auditory Perception/physiology; Brain/*physiopathology; Color Perception/physiology; Diffusion Tensor Imaging; Female; Humans; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Male; Music; Neural Pathways/*physiopathology; Perceptual Disorders/*physiopathology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations.  
  Call Number Serial 2071  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zamm, A.; Schlaug, G.; Eagleman, D.M.; Loui, P. file  url
openurl 
  Title Pathways to seeing music: enhanced structural connectivity in colored-music synesthesia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication NeuroImage Abbreviated Journal Neuroimage  
  Volume 74 Issue Pages 359-366  
  Keywords Auditory Perception/physiology; Brain/*physiopathology; Color Perception/physiology; Diffusion Tensor Imaging; Female; Humans; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Male; Music; Neural Pathways/*physiopathology; Perceptual Disorders/*physiopathology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Synesthesia, a condition in which a stimulus in one sensory modality consistently and automatically triggers concurrent percepts in another modality, provides a window into the neural correlates of cross-modal associations. While research on grapheme-color synesthesia has provided evidence for both hyperconnectivity-hyperbinding and disinhibited feedback as potential underlying mechanisms, less research has explored the neuroanatomical basis of other forms of synesthesia. In the current study we investigated the white matter correlates of colored-music synesthesia. As these synesthetes report seeing colors upon hearing musical sounds, we hypothesized that they might show unique patterns of connectivity between visual and auditory association areas. We used diffusion tensor imaging to trace the white matter tracts in temporal and occipital lobe regions in 10 synesthetes and 10 matched non-synesthete controls. Results showed that synesthetes possessed hemispheric patterns of fractional anisotropy, an index of white matter integrity, in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), a major white matter pathway that connects visual and auditory association areas to frontal regions. Specifically, white matter integrity within the right IFOF was significantly greater in synesthetes than controls. Furthermore, white matter integrity in synesthetes was correlated with scores on audiovisual tests of the Synesthesia Battery, especially in white matter underlying the right fusiform gyrus. Our findings provide the first evidence of a white matter substrate of colored-music synesthesia, and suggest that enhanced white matter connectivity is involved in enhanced cross-modal associations.  
  Call Number Serial 2073  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Zai, G.; Brandl, E.J.; Muller, D.J.; Richter, M.A.; Kennedy, J.L. file  url
openurl 
  Title Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an update and implications for clinicians Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Pharmacogenomics Abbreviated Journal Pharmacogenomics  
  Volume 15 Issue 8 Pages 1147-1157  
  Keywords Antidepressive Agents/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/genetics; Humans; Inactivation, Metabolic; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/*drug therapy/genetics/pathology; *Pharmacogenetics; Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/adverse effects/*therapeutic use; Ocd; antidepressant/drug/treatment response; cytochrome P450 drug metabolism/system; genetics; obsessive-compulsive and related disorders; obsessive-compulsive disorder; pharmacogenetics  
  Abstract Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder with high genetic influence. Antidepressants such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are widely accepted as the first-line medications for OCD; however, approximately 50% of OCD patients show poor response. Personalized medicine utilizing genetic testing has recently received much attention because the variability of antidepressant response and tolerability are partly due to an individual's genetic variations. This has led to researchers investigating the role of specific genetic factors on antidepressant response and utility of testing in the clinical realm. Genetic test panels are showing promise for guiding antidepressant treatment to improve outcomes in depression. This article will review the most recent findings in the pharmacogenetics of OCD and its related disorders. Promising results have been reported for several serotonergic and glutamatergic system genes and the cytochrome CYP450 liver enzyme genes, which appear to play an important role in OCD and antidepressant response.  
  Call Number Serial 1766  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, V.L. file  url
openurl 
  Title Serratia marcescens: historical perspective and clinical review Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication The New England Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal N Engl J Med  
  Volume 300 Issue 16 Pages 887-893  
  Keywords Aerosols; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Biological Warfare; Child; Cross Infection/epidemiology/etiology; Drug Contamination; Endocarditis, Bacterial/etiology; *Enterobacteriaceae Infections/drug therapy/epidemiology/transmission; History, Ancient; History, Medieval; History, Modern 1601-; Humans; Injections, Intravenous/adverse effects; Microbiology/history; Sepsis/etiology; *Serratia marcescens/isolation & purification/pathogenicity; Substance-Related Disorders/complications; United States  
  Abstract SERRATIA MARCESCENS is a bacterium recognized with increasing frequency as a cause of serious infection in man. This micro-organism has a romantic history dating to antiquity, when, because of production of a red pigment, it masqueraded as blood. In this century, this distinctive pigmentation, combined with its apparent low level of virulence, led to its use as a biologic marker. This article will review the more distinctive historical aspects of S. marcescens and discuss its clinical status as an emerging pathogen.  
  Call Number Serial 1990  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Yu, M.; Liu, Q.; Sun, J.; Yi, K.; Wu, L.; Tan, X. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Nicotine improves the functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biochemistry and Cell Biology = Biochimie et Biologie Cellulaire Abbreviated Journal Biochem Cell Biol  
  Volume 89 Issue 4 Pages 405-410  
  Keywords Bungarotoxins/pharmacology; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Movement/drug effects; Cell Shape; Cell Survival/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Endothelial Cells/*drug effects/physiology; Fetal Blood/cytology; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Mecamylamine/pharmacology; Neovascularization, Physiologic/drug effects; Nicotine/*pharmacology; Nicotinic Agonists/*pharmacology; Nicotinic Antagonists/pharmacology; Receptors, Nicotinic; Stem Cells/*drug effects/physiology  
  Abstract The aim of this study is to investigate whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the modulation of functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) induced by nicotine. Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and then the cells were plated on fibronectin-coated culture plates. Late EPCs were positive for 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-acLDL) uptake and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated Ulex europaeus agglutinin lectin (UEA-1) binding. Expression of von Willbrand factor (vWF), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), and alpha7 nAChR was detected by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Late EPCs of 3-5 passages were treated for 32 h with either vehicle or nicotine with or without pre-incubation of nAChR antagonism, mecamylamine, or alpha-bungarotoxin. The viability, migration, and in vitro vasculogenesis activity of late EPCs were assayed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and in vitro angiogenesis assay, respectively. Late EPCs adhesion assay was performed by replating cells on fibronectin-coated plates, and then adherent cells were counted. Incubation with 10 nmol/L nicotine enhanced viable, migratory, adhesive, and in vitro vasculogenesis capacity of late EPCs. The effect of nicotine on late EPCs can be attenuated by mecamylamine or alpha-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, nicotine improves the functional activity of late EPCs via nAChRs.  
  Call Number Serial 431  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations: