more information
Search within Results:

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Fausey, C.M.; Jayaraman, S.; Smith, L.B. file  url
openurl 
  Title From faces to hands: Changing visual input in the first two years Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Cognition Abbreviated Journal Cognition  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 101-107  
  Keywords *Child Development; Child, Preschool; *Facial Recognition; Female; Hand; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pattern Recognition, Visual; Photic Stimulation; *Social Perception; Statistics as Topic; *Visual Perception; *Egocentric vision; *Faces; *Hands; *Head camera; *Infancy; *Scene statistics  
  Abstract Human development takes place in a social context. Two pervasive sources of social information are faces and hands. Here, we provide the first report of the visual frequency of faces and hands in the everyday scenes available to infants. These scenes were collected by having infants wear head cameras during unconstrained everyday activities. Our corpus of 143hours of infant-perspective scenes, collected from 34 infants aged 1month to 2years, was sampled for analysis at 1/5Hz. The major finding from this corpus is that the faces and hands of social partners are not equally available throughout the first two years of life. Instead, there is an earlier period of dense face input and a later period of dense hand input. At all ages, hands in these scenes were primarily in contact with objects and the spatio-temporal co-occurrence of hands and faces was greater than expected by chance. The orderliness of the shift from faces to hands suggests a principled transition in the contents of visual experiences and is discussed in terms of the role of developmental gates on the timing and statistics of visual experiences.  
  Call Number Serial 1820  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fawcett, J. file  url
openurl 
  Title Targeting treatment in patients with mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression Type Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal J Clin Psychiatry  
  Volume 51 Suppl Issue Pages 40-43  
  Keywords Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use; Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology/*therapy; Clinical Trials as Topic; Comorbidity; Depressive Disorder/epidemiology/*therapy; Drug Therapy, Combination; Humans; Panic; Risk Factors; Suicide/psychology  
  Abstract Patients with major depression often exhibit clinical anxiety. Although not included among DSM-III-R criteria for major depression, clinical anxiety may be the most important symptom to assess in planning the treatment for this affective disorder. By actively treating the anxiety component, psychiatrists can modify serious suicide risk factors in some patients and provide the immediate benefits that will induce others to comply with antidepressant therapy.  
  Call Number Serial 210  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fearon, E.R.; Vogelstein, B. file  url
openurl 
  Title A genetic model for colorectal tumorigenesis Type Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication Cell Abbreviated Journal Cell  
  Volume 61 Issue 5 Pages 759-767  
  Keywords Alleles; Chromosome Deletion; Colorectal Neoplasms/*genetics; Heterozygote; Humans; Models, Genetic; Mutation; Oncogenes/genetics; Suppression, Genetic  
  Abstract  
  Call Number Serial 1723  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Feinberg, A.P.; Vogelstein, B. file  url
openurl 
  Title A technique for radiolabeling DNA restriction endonuclease fragments to high specific activity Type Journal Article
  Year 1983 Publication Analytical Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal Anal Biochem  
  Volume 132 Issue 1 Pages 6-13  
  Keywords Animals; Autoradiography; Base Sequence; Cytidine Triphosphate/pharmacology; DNA/biosynthesis/*isolation & purification; DNA Restriction Enzymes; Electrophoresis, Agar Gel; Humans; Phosphorus Radioisotopes; Plasmids; Templates, Genetic  
  Abstract A technique for conveniently radiolabeling DNA restriction endonuclease fragments to high specific activity is described. DNA fragments are purified from agarose gels directly by ethanol precipitation and are then denatured and labeled with the large fragment of DNA polymerase I, using random oligonucleotides as primers. Over 70% of the precursor triphosphate is routinely incorporated into complementary DNA, and specific activities of over 10(9) dpm/microgram of DNA can be obtained using relatively small amounts of precursor. These “oligolabeled” DNA fragments serve as efficient probes in filter hybridization experiments.  
  Call Number Serial 1722  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Feng, L.; Chiam, P.C.; Kua, E.-H.; Ng, T.P. file  url
openurl 
  Title Use of complementary and alternative medicines and mental disorders in community-living Asian older adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal Arch Gerontol Geriatr  
  Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 243-249  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Asian Continental Ancestry Group; Attitude to Health/*ethnology; Complementary Therapies/*utilization; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/therapy; Drug Utilization; *Drugs, Chinese Herbal; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Mental Disorders/*therapy; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Patient Acceptance of Health Care; Singapore  
  Abstract The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) and its link with mental health is poorly understood. It is not clear whether mentally ill persons use CAM because conventional medical care does not meet their needs. In a nationally representative random sample of 1092 individuals aged 60 in Singapore, we determined CAM use and the prevalence of mental disorders using Geriatric Mental State (GMS) and found that overall CAM use, predominantly Chinese herbal medicines, was reported by an estimated 42.7% of the population. Depression (odds ratio=OR=1.94; 95% CI=1.26-2.98) and poor self-rated mental health (OR=2.44; 95% CI=1.25-4.80) were associated with CAM use, independently of other risks factors and correlates of CAM use. Although depressed Asians more frequently used CAM than conventional health care, we could find no evidence in this study to indicate that among individuals with depression, CAM users compared to nonusers, were less likely to seek treatment from general and mental health professionals or were more likely to have negative beliefs and attitudes about mental illnesses and its treatment. This is consistent with the common observation that the use of CAM complements rather than replaces conventional treatments.  
  Call Number Serial 1347  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fergusson, D.M.; Boden, J.M.; Horwood, L.J. file  url
openurl 
  Title The developmental antecedents of illicit drug use: evidence from a 25-year longitudinal study Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Drug and Alcohol Dependence Abbreviated Journal Drug Alcohol Depend  
  Volume 96 Issue 1-2 Pages 165-177  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Age Factors; Child; Child Abuse/psychology/statistics & numerical data; Cohort Studies; Conduct Disorder/epidemiology/psychology; Humans; Life Change Events; Longitudinal Studies; Models, Statistical; New Zealand/epidemiology; Parents/psychology; Peer Group; Prospective Studies; Psychology, Adolescent/statistics & numerical data; Psychology, Child; Regression Analysis; Risk Factors; *Social Adjustment; Street Drugs/*adverse effects; Substance-Related Disorders/*diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The present study examined the developmental antecedents of illicit drug use and abuse/dependence. METHODS: A 25-year prospective longitudinal study of the health, development, and adjustment of a birth cohort of 1265 New Zealand children. Measures included assessments of adolescent and young adult illicit drug use and abuse/dependence; cannabis use to age 25; measures of parental adjustment; measures of exposure to childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse, and interparental violence; novelty-seeking; childhood and early adolescent adjustment and substance use; and affiliation with substance-using peers. RESULTS: Illicit drug use and abuse/dependence from ages 16 to 25 were significantly associated (all p values<.05) with a range of parental adjustment measures; exposure to abuse in childhood; individual factors; and measures of childhood and early adolescent adjustment. Analyses using repeated measures logistic regression models suggested that parental illicit drug use, gender, novelty-seeking, and childhood conduct disorder predicted later illicit drug use and abuse/dependence. Further analyses revealed that these pathways to illicit drug use and abuse/dependence were mediated via cannabis use, affiliation with substance-using peers, and alcohol use during ages 16-25. CONCLUSIONS: The current study suggested that the illicit drug use and abuse/dependence were associated with a range of early life circumstances and processes that put individuals at greater risk of illicit drug use and abuse/dependence. However, the use of cannabis in late adolescence and early adulthood emerged as the strongest risk factor for later involvement in other illicit drugs.  
  Call Number Serial 1682  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fernandez-del-Valle, M.; Larumbe-Zabala, E.; Villasenor-Montarroso, A.; Cardona Gonzalez, C.; Diez-Vega, I.; Lopez Mojares, L.M.; Perez Ruiz, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Resistance training enhances muscular performance in patients with anorexia nervosa: a randomized controlled trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication The International Journal of Eating Disorders Abbreviated Journal Int J Eat Disord  
  Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 601-609  
  Keywords Adolescent; Analysis of Variance; Anorexia Nervosa/*physiopathology/therapy; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Child; Female; Humans; Motor Skills; *Muscle Strength; *Resistance Training; agility test; anorexia nervosa; body mass index; detraining; resistance training; restricting type; strength test  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Low-intensity exercise applied in anorexia nervosa patients has been shown to have a harmless effect on body composition and to effect short-term improvements in muscular strength and agility. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a high-intensity resistance training program designed for adolescents to improve strength and agility in anorexia nervosa restricting-type patients (AN-R). METHODS: From a total of 36 female patients with AN-R, one group (intervention, n = 18) underwent a supervised high-intensity resistance training program lasting 8 weeks, and the other group with no exercise (control, n = 18). Body weight, body mass index, whole-body muscular strength, and agility were assessed before, after, and 4 weeks after training (detraining). RESULTS: Leg-press, bench-press, and lateral row tests improved significantly (p < 0.001) after 8 weeks of training compared with controls. Improvements were maintained after the detraining period. The training program also showed beneficial effects on agility. DISCUSSION: A high-intensity resistance training program adapted to the recommendations for adolescents in AN-R patients was effective and safe, improving muscular strength in the whole body and the ability to perform daily tasks. However, long-term maintenance of gains seems to be linked to the continuance of training or the use of a maintenance program.  
  Call Number Serial 1029  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fernandez-del-Valle, M.; Larumbe-Zabala, E.; Villasenor-Montarroso, A.; Cardona Gonzalez, C.; Diez-Vega, I.; Lopez Mojares, L.M.; Perez Ruiz, M. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Resistance training enhances muscular performance in patients with anorexia nervosa: a randomized controlled trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication The International Journal of Eating Disorders Abbreviated Journal Int J Eat Disord  
  Volume 47 Issue 6 Pages 601-609  
  Keywords Adolescent; Analysis of Variance; Anorexia Nervosa/*physiopathology/therapy; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Child; Female; Humans; Motor Skills; *Muscle Strength; *Resistance Training; agility test; anorexia nervosa; body mass index; detraining; resistance training; restricting type; strength test  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Low-intensity exercise applied in anorexia nervosa patients has been shown to have a harmless effect on body composition and to effect short-term improvements in muscular strength and agility. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a high-intensity resistance training program designed for adolescents to improve strength and agility in anorexia nervosa restricting-type patients (AN-R). METHODS: From a total of 36 female patients with AN-R, one group (intervention, n = 18) underwent a supervised high-intensity resistance training program lasting 8 weeks, and the other group with no exercise (control, n = 18). Body weight, body mass index, whole-body muscular strength, and agility were assessed before, after, and 4 weeks after training (detraining). RESULTS: Leg-press, bench-press, and lateral row tests improved significantly (p < 0.001) after 8 weeks of training compared with controls. Improvements were maintained after the detraining period. The training program also showed beneficial effects on agility. DISCUSSION: A high-intensity resistance training program adapted to the recommendations for adolescents in AN-R patients was effective and safe, improving muscular strength in the whole body and the ability to perform daily tasks. However, long-term maintenance of gains seems to be linked to the continuance of training or the use of a maintenance program.  
  Call Number Serial 1076  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Filaire, M.; Vacheron, J.J.; Vanneuville, G.; Poumarat, G.; Garcier, J.M.; Harouna, Y.; Guillot, M.; Terver, S.; Toumi, H.; Thierry, C. file  url
openurl 
  Title Influence of the mode of load carriage on the static posture of the pelvic girdle and the thoracic and lumbar spine in vivo Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Surgical and Radiologic Anatomy : SRA Abbreviated Journal Surg Radiol Anat  
  Volume 23 Issue 1 Pages 27-31  
  Keywords Adult; Humans; Intervertebral Disc Displacement/physiopathology; Lumbar Vertebrae/*physiology; Male; Pelvis/*physiology; Posture/*physiology; Reference Values; Thoracic Vertebrae/*physiology; Weight-Bearing/physiology  
  Abstract The influence of various modes of carrying a load of 16 kg (15.69 DaN) on the static positioning of the pelvic girdle and the thoracic and lumbar segments of the spine was examined in seven male subjects. The displacement of cutaneous markers attached to easily palpable skeletal landmarks was recorded using 4 CCD cameras; the data acquired were analysed using an optoelectronic technique (SAGA3). The subjects stood upright on an AMTI biomechanical force platform, from which the ground reaction forces enabled displacements of the centre of gravity axis and thus the moment of the mass carried to be determined. The modes of load carriage examined were: 1) in a case in the left hand; 2) in a case in the right hand; 3) equally in two cases; 4) on the head; 5) in a rucksack; and 6) in an anterior bag. The results showed displacements of the pelvic girdle, the caudal and cranial lumbar segments, and the caudal and cranial thoracic segments in the three orthogonal planes (sagittal, frontal and transverse). The influence of the moment created by the load was seen in the statokinesigrams. The use of external markers using an optoelectronic technique, in association with the ground reaction forces, enables the mode of load carriage to be determined. The results show that the influence of the moment exerted by the mode of load carriage on the gravity axis has important ergonomic consequences.  
  Call Number Serial 143  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Firsov, A.A.; Strukova, E.N.; Portnoy, Y.A.; Shlykova, D.S.; Zinner, S.H. file  url
openurl 
  Title Bacterial antibiotic resistance studies using in vitro dynamic models: Population analysis vs. susceptibility testing as endpoints of mutant enrichment Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents Abbreviated Journal Int J Antimicrob Agents  
  Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 313-318  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/*pharmacology; Ciprofloxacin/*pharmacology; *Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Humans; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Models, Theoretical; Mutation; Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/*drug effects/*growth & development/isolation & purification; *Selection, Genetic; Time Factors; Bacterial resistance studies; Fluoroquinolones; Population analysis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Susceptibility testing  
  Abstract Emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance is usually characterised either by population analysis or susceptibility testing. To compare these endpoints in their ability to demonstrate clear relationships with the ratio of 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24) to the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), enrichment of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants of four clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in an in vitro dynamic model that simulates mono-exponential pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin over a wide range of the AUC24/MIC ratios. Each organism was exposed to twice-daily ciprofloxacin for 3 days. Amplification of resistant mutants was monitored by plating on media with 2x, 4x, 8x and 16x MIC of ciprofloxacin. Population analysis data were expressed by the area under the bacterial mutant concentration-time curve (AUBCM). Changes in P. aeruginosa susceptibility were examined by daily MIC determinations. To account for the different susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa strains, post-exposure MICs (MICfinal) were related to the MICs determined with the starting inoculum (MICinitial). For each organism, AUC24/MIC relationships both with AUBCM and MICfinal/MICinitial were bell-shaped, but the latter were more strain-specific than the former. Using combined data on all four isolates, AUBCM showed a better correlation than MICfinal/MICinitial (r(2)=0.75 vs. r(2)=0.53). The shift of MICfinal/MICinitial relative to AUBCM vs. AUC24/MIC curves resulted in a weak correlation between AUBCM and MICfinal/MICinitial (r(2)=0.41). These data suggest that population analysis is preferable to susceptibility testing in bacterial resistance studies and that these endpoints should not be considered interchangeable.  
  Call Number Serial 1214  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations: