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Author Amorim, K.N.S.; Chagas, D.C.G.; Sulczewski, F.B.; Boscardin, S.B. file  url
openurl 
  Title Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Immunology Research Abbreviated Journal J Immunol Res  
  Volume (down) 2016 Issue Pages 2926436  
  Keywords Antigen Presentation; Dendritic Cells/*immunology; Humans; Immunologic Tests; Life Cycle Stages; Malaria/*immunology/parasitology; Plasmodium/growth & development/immunology; T-Lymphocytes/immunology  
  Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation.  
  Call Number Serial 1687  
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Author Perez, V.I.; Bokov, A.; Van Remmen, H.; Mele, J.; Ran, Q.; Ikeno, Y.; Richardson, A. file  url
openurl 
  Title Is the oxidative stress theory of aging dead? Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Biochimica et Biophysica Acta Abbreviated Journal Biochim Biophys Acta  
  Volume (down) 1790 Issue 10 Pages 1005-1014  
  Keywords Aging/genetics/*physiology; Animals; Catalase/genetics/metabolism; Humans; Mice; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Oxidative Stress/*physiology; Superoxide Dismutase/genetics/metabolism; Survival Analysis  
  Abstract Currently, the oxidative stress (or free radical) theory of aging is the most popular explanation of how aging occurs at the molecular level. While data from studies in invertebrates (e.g., C. elegans and Drosophila) and rodents show a correlation between increased lifespan and resistance to oxidative stress (and in some cases reduced oxidative damage to macromolecules), direct evidence showing that alterations in oxidative damage/stress play a role in aging are limited to a few studies with transgenic Drosophila that overexpress antioxidant enzymes. Over the past eight years, our laboratory has conducted an exhaustive study on the effect of under- or overexpressing a large number and wide variety of genes coding for antioxidant enzymes. In this review, we present the survival data from these studies together. Because only one (the deletion of the Sod1 gene) of the 18 genetic manipulations we studied had an effect on lifespan, our data calls into serious question the hypothesis that alterations in oxidative damage/stress play a role in the longevity of mice.  
  Call Number Serial 1929  
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Author Heinisch, J.J. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Baker's yeast as a tool for the development of antifungal kinase inhibitors--targeting protein kinase C and the cell integrity pathway Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Biochimica et Biophysica Acta Abbreviated Journal Biochim Biophys Acta  
  Volume (down) 1754 Issue 1-2 Pages 171-182  
  Keywords Antifungal Agents/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology; Cell Cycle/*drug effects; Cell Wall/drug effects/metabolism; Enzyme Inhibitors/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology; Humans; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects; Models, Biological; Protein Kinase C/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism; Protein Kinases/genetics/metabolism; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/chemistry/enzymology/*metabolism; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism  
  Abstract Today, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is probably the best-studied eukaryotic organism. This review first focuses on the signaling process which is mediated by the unique yeast protein kinase C (Pkc1p) and a downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. This pathway ensures cellular integrity by sensing cell surface stress and controlling cell wall biosynthesis and progression through the cell cycle. The domain structure of Pkc1p is conserved from yeast to humans. A yeast system for heterologous expression of specific domains in a chimeric yeast/mammalian PKC enzyme (“domain shuffling”) is depicted. It is also proposed how this system could be employed for the study of protein kinase inhibitors in high-throughput screens. Moreover, a reporter assay that allows a quantitative readout of the activity of the cell integrity signaling pathway is introduced. Since a variety of protein kinases take part in the signal transduction, this broadens the range of targets for potential inhibitors.  
  Call Number Serial 554  
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Author Ross, R.S.; Sherrill, K.R.; Stern, C.E. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title The hippocampus is functionally connected to the striatum and orbitofrontal cortex during context dependent decision making Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Brain Res  
  Volume (down) 1423 Issue Pages 53-66  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Brain Mapping; Corpus Striatum/blood supply/*physiology; Decision Making/*physiology; Face; Female; Functional Laterality; Hippocampus/blood supply/*physiology; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Neural Pathways/blood supply/*physiology; Oxygen/blood; Pattern Recognition, Visual/physiology; Photic Stimulation/methods; Prefrontal Cortex/blood supply/*physiology; Reaction Time/physiology; Statistics as Topic; Young Adult  
  Abstract Many of our everyday actions are only appropriate in certain situations and selecting the appropriate behavior requires that we use current context and previous experience to guide our decisions. The current study examined hippocampal functional connectivity with prefrontal and striatal regions during a task that required participants to make decisions based on the contextual retrieval of overlapping sequential representations. Participants learned four sequences comprised of six faces each. An overlapping condition was created by having two sequences with two identical faces as the middle images. A non-overlapping condition contained two sequences that did not share any faces between them. Hippocampal functional connectivity was assessed during the presentation period and at the critical choice, where participants had to make a contextually dependent decision. The left hippocampus showed significantly increased functional connectivity with dorsal and ventral striatum and anterior cingulate cortex during the presentation period of the overlapping compared to the non-overlapping condition after participants knew the sequences. At the critical choice point of the overlapping condition, the left hippocampus showed stronger functional connectivity with the orbitofrontal cortex. These functional connectivity results suggest that the hippocampus may play a role in decision making by predicting the possibilities of what might come next, allowing orbitofrontal and striatal regions to evaluate the expected choice options in order to make the correct action at the choice point.  
  Call Number Serial 152  
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Author Taffe, M.A.; Taffe, W.J. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Rhesus monkeys employ a procedural strategy to reduce working memory load in a self-ordered spatial search task Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Brain Res  
  Volume (down) 1413 Issue Pages 43-50  
  Keywords Animals; Appetitive Behavior/*physiology; Humans; Locomotion/physiology; Macaca mulatta; Male; Memory, Short-Term/*physiology; Neuropsychological Tests; Photic Stimulation/methods; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Spatial Behavior/*physiology  
  Abstract Several nonhuman primate species have been reported to employ a distance-minimizing, traveling salesman-like, strategy during foraging as well as in experimental spatial search tasks involving lesser amounts of locomotion. Spatial sequencing may optimize performance by reducing reference or episodic memory loads, locomotor costs, competition or other demands. A computerized self-ordered spatial search (SOSS) memory task has been adapted from a human neuropsychological testing battery (CANTAB, Cambridge Cognition, Ltd) for use in monkeys. Accurate completion of a trial requires sequential responses to colored boxes in two or more spatial locations without repetition of a previous location. Marmosets have been reported to employ a circling pattern of search, suggesting spontaneous adoption of a strategy to reduce working memory load. In this study the SOSS performance of rhesus monkeys was assessed to determine if the use of a distance-minimizing search path enhances accuracy. A novel strategy score, independent of the trial difficulty and arrangement of boxes, has been devised. Analysis of the performance of 21 monkeys trained on SOSS over 2 years shows that a distance-minimizing search strategy is associated with improved accuracy. This effect is observed within individuals as they improve over many cumulative sessions of training on the task and across individuals at any given level of training. Erroneous trials were associated with a failure to deploy the strategy. It is concluded that the effect of utilizing the strategy on this locomotion-free, laboratory task is to enhance accuracy by reducing demands on spatial working memory resources.  
  Call Number Serial 80  
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Author Schulze, K.; Koelsch, S. file  url
openurl 
  Title Working memory for speech and music Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal Ann N Y Acad Sci  
  Volume (down) 1252 Issue Pages 229-236  
  Keywords Auditory Perception--physiology; Feedback, Sensory--physiology; Humans; Learning--physiology; Memory, Long-Term--physiology; Memory, Short-Term--physiology; Models, Neurological; Models, Psychological; Music--psychology; Neuroimaging; Neuronal Plasticity--physiology; Neurosciences; Speech--physiology; Speech Perception--physiology  
  Abstract The present paper reviews behavioral and neuroimaging findings on similarities and differences between verbal and tonal working memory (WM), the influence of musical training, and the effect of strategy use on WM for tones. Whereas several studies demonstrate an overlap of core structures (Broca's area, premotor cortex, inferior parietal lobule), preliminary findings are discussed that imply, if confirmed, the existence of a tonal and a phonological loop in musicians. This conclusion is based on the findings of partly differing neural networks underlying verbal and tonal WM in musicians, suggesting that functional plasticity has been induced by musical training. We further propose a strong link between production and auditory WM: data indicate that both verbal and tonal auditory WM are based on the knowledge of how to produce the to-be-remembered sounds and, therefore, that sensorimotor representations are involved in the temporary maintenance of auditory information in WM.  
  Call Number Serial 478  
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Author Sarkamo, T.; Soto, D. file  url
openurl 
  Title Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal Ann N Y Acad Sci  
  Volume (down) 1252 Issue Pages 266-281  
  Keywords Auditory Perception/physiology; Cognition/physiology; Emotions/physiology; Functional Neuroimaging; Humans; Models, Neurological; Models, Psychological; *Music Therapy; Neuronal Plasticity/physiology; Neurosciences; Stroke/physiopathology/psychology/rehabilitation/*therapy; Visual Perception/physiology  
  Abstract Music is an enjoyable leisure activity that also engages many emotional, cognitive, and motor processes in the brain. Here, we will first review previous literature on the emotional and cognitive effects of music listening in healthy persons and various clinical groups. Then we will present findings about the short- and long-term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects. First, our results indicate that listening to pleasant music can have a short-term facilitating effect on visual awareness in patients with visual neglect, which is associated with functional coupling between emotional and attentional brain regions. Second, daily music listening can improve auditory and verbal memory, focused attention, and mood as well as induce structural gray matter changes in the early poststroke stage. The psychological and neural mechanisms potentially underlying the rehabilitating effect of music after stroke are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 1371  
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Author Gunstad, J.; Spitznagel, M.B.; Keary, T.A.; Glickman, E.; Alexander, T.; Karrer, J.; Stanek, K.; Reese, L.; Juvancic-Heltzel, J. file  url
openurl 
  Title Serum leptin levels are associated with cognitive function in older adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Brain Res  
  Volume (down) 1230 Issue Pages 233-236  
  Keywords Aged/*physiology/*psychology; Cognition/*physiology; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Female; Frontal Lobe/physiology; Humans; Insulin/blood; Leptin/*blood; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Psychomotor Performance/physiology; Verbal Learning/physiology  
  Abstract Recent work suggests that leptin, a circulating adipokinine hormone, might contribute to age-related cognitive decline. The present study investigated the relationship between serum leptin levels and cognitive function in older adults. Thirty-five older adults (73.69+/-6.62 years of age) without significant neurologic or psychiatric history completed a fasting blood draw and a brief neuropsychological test battery. Partial correlations adjusting for demographic and medical conditions showed that higher leptin levels were associated with poorer performance on Trail Making Test B (r = .46, p = .01). These findings indicate that serum leptin levels are negatively associated with speeded executive function in older adults without significant neurological or psychiatric conditions. The mechanisms for this relationship are unknown and require further examination. Such studies may provide key insight into the mechanisms of age-related cognitive decline and identify possible interventions.  
  Call Number Serial 1936  
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Author Hasebe, K.; Kawai, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kawamura, K.; Tanaka, T.; Narita, M.; Nagase, H.; Suzuki, T. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Possible pharmacotherapy of the opioid kappa receptor agonist for drug dependence Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal Ann N Y Acad Sci  
  Volume (down) 1025 Issue Pages 404-413  
  Keywords Animals; Humans; Morphinans/chemistry/metabolism/*therapeutic use; Receptors, Opioid, kappa/*agonists/metabolism; Spiro Compounds/chemistry/metabolism/*therapeutic use; Substance-Related Disorders/*drug therapy/metabolism/psychology  
  Abstract Because there are few efficacious medications for drug dependence, many clinical trials are being conducted in earnest to find such medications. Considerable evidence has shown that opioid kappa receptor agonists attenuate several behavioral responses induced by drugs of abuse. Although this raises the possibility that opioid kappa receptor agonists may be useful for the treatment of drug dependence on drugs of abuse, it has been previously reported that treatment with selective opioid kappa receptor agonists causes a psychotomimetic effect and dysphoria both in clinical studies and experimental animal models. As a result, we found the novel opioid kappa receptor agonist TRK-820, another chemical class of opioid kappa receptor agonist that has a morphinan scaffold unlike prototypical opioid kappa receptor agonists, by application of a modified message-address concept. TRK-820 showed high selectivity for an opioid kappa receptor, and strong agonistic activity in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Like other opioid kappa receptor agonists, TRK-820 could markedly suppress the rewarding effects induced by morphine and cocaine and the discriminative stimulus effect of cocaine. Furthermore, TRK-820 attenuated the mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine-withdrawal aversion in a conditioned place preference paradigm. It is worthwhile to note that unlike prototypical opioid kappa receptor agonists, TRK-820 failed to produce a significant place aversion in rodents at doses that were sufficient to produce significant antinociception. Taken together, these findings indicate that TRK-820 may be useful for the treatment of drug dependence without any aversive effects.  
  Call Number Serial 232  
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Author Juslin, P.N.; Laukka, P. file  url
openurl 
  Title Emotional expression in speech and music: evidence of cross-modal similarities Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal Ann N Y Acad Sci  
  Volume (down) 1000 Issue Pages 279-282  
  Keywords *Affect; Culture; *Facial Expression; Humans; *Music; *Speech  
  Abstract Many authors have speculated about a close relationship between vocal expression of emotions and musical expression of emotions, but evidence bearing on this relationship has unfortunately been lacking. This review of 104 studies of vocal expression and 41 studies of music performance reveals similarities between the 2 channels concerning (a) the accuracy with which discrete emotions were communicated to listeners and (b) the emotion-specific patterns of acoustic cues used to communicate each emotion. The patterns are generally consistent with K. R. Scherer's (1986) theoretical predictions. The results can explain why music is perceived as expressive of emotion, and they are consistent with an evolutionary perspective on vocal expression of emotions. Discussion focuses on theoretical accounts and directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)  
  Call Number Serial 479  
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