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Author (up) Amato, P.R.; Keith, B. file  url
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  Title Parental divorce and the well-being of children: a meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication Psychological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Psychol Bull  
  Volume 110 Issue 1 Pages 26-46  
  Keywords Adaptation, Psychological; Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Divorce--psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Parent-Child Relations; Personality Development  
  Abstract This meta-analysis involved 92 studies that compared children living in divorced single-parent families with children living in continuously intact families on measures of well-being. Children of divorce scored lower than children in intact families across a variety of outcomes, with the median effect size being .14 of a standard deviation. For some outcomes, methodologically sophisticated studies yielded weaker effect sizes than did other studies. In addition, for some outcomes, more recent studies yielded weaker effect sizes than did studies carried out during earlier decades. Some support was found for theoretical perspectives emphasizing parental absence and economic disadvantage, but the most consistent support was found for a family conflict perspective.  
  Call Number Serial 277  
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Author (up) Gamer, M.; Verschuere, B.; Crombez, G.; Vossel, G. file  url
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  Title Combining physiological measures in the detection of concealed information Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 95 Issue 3 Pages 333-340  
  Keywords Adult; Galvanic Skin Response/*physiology; Guilt; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Lie Detection/*psychology; Male; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Regression Analysis; Respiratory Mechanics/*physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Meta-analytic research has confirmed that skin conductance response (SCR) measures have high validity for the detection of concealed information. Furthermore, cumulating research has provided evidence for the validity of two other autonomic measures: Heart rate (HR) and Respiration Line Length (RLL). In the present report, we compared SCR detection efficiency with HR and RLL, and investigated whether HR and RLL provide incremental validity to electrodermal responses. Analyses were based on data from 7 different samples covering 275 guilty and 53 innocent examinees. Results revealed that the area under the ROC curve was significantly higher for SCR than for HR and RLL. A weighted combination of these measures using a logistic regression model yielded slightly larger validity coefficients than the best single measure. These results proved to be stable across different protocols and various samples.  
  Call Number Serial 1444  
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Author (up) Olatunji, B.O.; Cisler, J.M.; Deacon, B.J. file  url
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  Title Efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders: a review of meta-analytic findings Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication The Psychiatric Clinics of North America Abbreviated Journal Psychiatr Clin North Am  
  Volume 33 Issue 3 Pages 557-577  
  Keywords Anxiety Disorders/*therapy; Cognitive Therapy/*methods; Humans; Meta-Analysis as Topic  
  Abstract Numerous clinical trials have supported the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Accordingly, CBT has been formally recognized as an empirically supported treatment for anxiety-related conditions. This article reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of CBT for anxiety disorders. Specifically, contemporary meta-analytic studies on the treatment of anxiety disorders are reviewed and the efficacy of CBT is examined. Although the specific components of CBT differ depending on the study design and the anxiety disorder treated, meta-analyses suggest that CBT procedures (particularly exposure-based approaches) are highly efficacious. CBT generally outperforms wait-list and placebo controls. Thus, CBT provides incremental efficacy above and beyond nonspecific factors. For some anxiety disorders, CBT also tends to outperform other psychosocial treatment modalities. The implications of available meta-analytic findings in further delineating the efficacy and dissemination of CBT for anxiety disorders are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 1772  
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Author (up) West, C.E.; Jenmalm, M.C.; Kozyrskyj, A.L.; Prescott, S.L. file  url
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  Title Probiotics for treatment and primary prevention of allergic diseases and asthma: looking back and moving forward Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Expert Review of Clinical Immunology Abbreviated Journal Expert Rev Clin Immunol  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages 625-639  
  Keywords Animals; Asthma/*therapy; Humans; Hypersensitivity/*therapy; *Immunity, Mucosal; Meta-Analysis as Topic; *Microbiota; Primary Prevention/trends; Probiotics/*therapeutic use; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; *Diversity; *dysbiosis; *eczema; *gut microbiome; *hygiene hypothesis; *primary prevention; *probiotic  
  Abstract Microbial ecosystems cover the surface of the human body and it is becoming increasingly clear that our modern environment has profound effects on microbial composition and diversity. A dysbiotic gut microbiota has been associated with allergic diseases and asthma in cross-sectional and observational studies. In an attempt to restore this dysbiosis, probiotics have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. Here, we review treatment and primary prevention studies, recent meta-analyses, and discuss the current understanding of the role of probiotics in this context. Many meta-analyses have shown a moderate benefit of probiotics for eczema prevention, whereas there is less evidence of a benefit for other allergic manifestations. Because of very low quality evidence and heterogeneity between studies, specific advice on the most effective regimens cannot yet be given – not even for eczema prevention. To be able to adopt results into specific recommendations, international expert organizations stress the need for well-designed studies.  
  Call Number Serial 1932  
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