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Author (up) Amici, M.; Eusebi, F.; Miledi, R. file  url
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  Title Effects of the antibiotic gentamicin on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Neuropharmacology Abbreviated Journal Neuropharmacology  
  Volume 49 Issue 5 Pages 627-637  
  Keywords Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents--pharmacology; Cochlea--drug effects; DNA, Complementary--biosynthesis; Electrophysiology; Gentamicins--pharmacology; Humans; Membrane Potentials--drug effects, physiology; Mice; Nicotinic Antagonists; Oocytes--metabolism; Patch-Clamp Techniques; RNA, Complementary--biosynthesis; Receptors, Nicotinic--biosynthesis, drug effects, genetics; Torpedo; Vestibule, Labyrinth--drug effects; Xenopus; alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor  
  Abstract Medical treatment with the aminoglycosidic antibiotic gentamicin may produce side effects that include neuromuscular blockage and ototoxicity; which are believed to result from a dysfunction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Gentamicin is known to reversibly block ACh-currents generated by the activation of muscle-type alphabetagammadelta-AChR and neuronal alpha9-AChR. We studied the effects of gentamicin on heteromeric alphabetagammadelta-AChR and homomeric alpha7-AChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Prolonged treatment with gentamicin, and other antibiotics, differentially altered alphabetagammadelta- and alpha7-AChR responses. Specifically, gentamicin accelerated desensitization and did not reduce ACh-currents in oocytes expressing alphabetagammadelta-AChRs, whereas ACh-currents were reduced and desensitization was unaltered in oocytes expressing alpha7-AChRs. Moreover, acutely applied gentamicin acted as a competitive antagonist on both types of receptors and increased the rate of desensitization in alphabetagammadelta-AChR while reducing the rate of desensitization in alpha7-AChR. This data helps to better understand the action of gentamicin on muscle and nervous tissues, providing mechanistic insights that could eventually lead to improving the medical use of aminoglycosides.  
  Call Number Serial 445  
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Author (up) Andersson, D.R.; Bjornsson, E.; Bergquist, F.; Nissbrandt, H. file  url
openurl 
  Title Motor activity-induced dopamine release in the substantia nigra is regulated by muscarinic receptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Experimental Neurology Abbreviated Journal Exp Neurol  
  Volume 221 Issue 1 Pages 251-259  
  Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; Area Under Curve; Brain Injuries/chemically induced/*pathology; Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods; Dendrites/drug effects/metabolism; Disease Models, Animal; Dopamine/*metabolism; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Electrochemistry/methods; Female; Functional Laterality; Mecamylamine/pharmacology; Microdialysis/methods; Motor Activity/drug effects/*physiology; Muscarinic Antagonists/pharmacology; Nicotinic Antagonists/pharmacology; Oxidopamine; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Receptors, Muscarinic/*physiology; Rotarod Performance Test/methods; Scopolamine Hydrobromide/pharmacology; Substantia Nigra/drug effects/*metabolism/pathology; gamma-Aminobutyric Acid/metabolism  
  Abstract Nigro-striatal neurons release dopamine not only from their axon terminals in the striatum, but also from somata and dendrites in the substantia nigra. Somatodendritic dopamine release in the substantia nigra can facilitate motor function by mechanisms that may act independently of axon terminal dopamine release in the striatum. The dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra receive a cholinergic input from the pedunculopontine nucleus. Despite recent efforts to introduce this nucleus as a potential target for deep brain stimulation to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease; and the well-known antiparkinsonian effects of anticholinergic drugs; the cholinergic influence on somatodendritic dopamine release is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible regulation of locomotor-induced dopamine release in the substantia nigra by endogenous acetylcholine release. In intact and 6-OHDA hemi-lesioned animals alike, the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, when perfused in the substantia nigra, amplified the locomotor-induced somatodendritic dopamine release to approximately 200% of baseline, compared to 120-130% of baseline in vehicle-treated animals. A functional importance of nigral muscarinic receptor activation was demonstrated in hemi-lesioned animals, where motor performance was significantly improved by scopolamine to 82% of pre-lesion performance, as compared to 56% in vehicle-treated controls. The results indicate that muscarinic activity in the substantia nigra is of functional importance in an animal Parkinson's disease model, and strengthen the notion that nigral dopaminergic regulation of motor activity/performance is independent of striatal dopamine release.  
  Call Number Serial 308  
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Author (up) Yu, M.; Liu, Q.; Sun, J.; Yi, K.; Wu, L.; Tan, X. file  url
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  Title Nicotine improves the functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Biochemistry and Cell Biology = Biochimie et Biologie Cellulaire Abbreviated Journal Biochem Cell Biol  
  Volume 89 Issue 4 Pages 405-410  
  Keywords Bungarotoxins/pharmacology; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Movement/drug effects; Cell Shape; Cell Survival/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Endothelial Cells/*drug effects/physiology; Fetal Blood/cytology; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Mecamylamine/pharmacology; Neovascularization, Physiologic/drug effects; Nicotine/*pharmacology; Nicotinic Agonists/*pharmacology; Nicotinic Antagonists/pharmacology; Receptors, Nicotinic; Stem Cells/*drug effects/physiology  
  Abstract The aim of this study is to investigate whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the modulation of functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) induced by nicotine. Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and then the cells were plated on fibronectin-coated culture plates. Late EPCs were positive for 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-acLDL) uptake and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated Ulex europaeus agglutinin lectin (UEA-1) binding. Expression of von Willbrand factor (vWF), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), and alpha7 nAChR was detected by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Late EPCs of 3-5 passages were treated for 32 h with either vehicle or nicotine with or without pre-incubation of nAChR antagonism, mecamylamine, or alpha-bungarotoxin. The viability, migration, and in vitro vasculogenesis activity of late EPCs were assayed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and in vitro angiogenesis assay, respectively. Late EPCs adhesion assay was performed by replating cells on fibronectin-coated plates, and then adherent cells were counted. Incubation with 10 nmol/L nicotine enhanced viable, migratory, adhesive, and in vitro vasculogenesis capacity of late EPCs. The effect of nicotine on late EPCs can be attenuated by mecamylamine or alpha-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, nicotine improves the functional activity of late EPCs via nAChRs.  
  Call Number Serial 431  
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