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Author (up) Bennett, J.W.; Bentley, R. file  url
openurl 
  Title Seeing red: the story of prodigiosin Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Advances in Applied Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Adv Appl Microbiol  
  Volume 47 Issue Pages 1-32  
  Keywords Bacteriology/history; Bread/microbiology; History, 18th Century; History, 19th Century; History, 20th Century; Pigments, Biological/*chemistry/history/metabolism/pharmacology; Prodigiosin/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology; Serratia marcescens/*chemistry/metabolism  
  Abstract S. marcescens has played an important role in the history of bacterial taxonomy, in research on the transmission of bacterial aerosols, in the study of emerging nosocomial infections, and in the understanding of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The prodigiosin pigments have intrigued organic chemists and pharmacologists, and play roles in the treatment of infectious diseases such as malaria, and perhaps as immunosuppressant agents. Undecylprodiginine played an important role in the first cloning of a gene, playing a defined role in the biosynthesis of an antibiotic. An O-methyltransferase gene was isolated by complementation and the color of undecylprodiginine was used as the selectable phenotype. The regulation of prodigiosin biosynthesis is complex, being influenced by increased glucose levels and decreased by increased phosphate level. The antibiotic resistance of many strains of S. marcescens is a serious problem with rapid horizontal transfer of drug resistance by plasmids.  
  Call Number Serial 1639  
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Author (up) Danyuo, Y.; Obayemi, J.D.; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S.; Ani, C.J.; Odusanya, O.S.; Oni, Y.; Anuku, N.; Malatesta, K.; Soboyejo, W.O. file  url
openurl 
  Title Prodigiosin release from an implantable biomedical device: kinetics of localized cancer drug release Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Materials Science & Engineering. C, Materials for Biological Applications Abbreviated Journal Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl  
  Volume 42 Issue Pages 734-745  
  Keywords Acrylic Resins/chemistry; Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry/*pharmacokinetics; Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/instrumentation; Diffusion; Drug Delivery Systems/instrumentation; Drug Liberation; Drug Therapy/*instrumentation; Hydrogels/chemistry; Hyperthermia, Induced; Kinetics; Prodigiosin/chemistry/*pharmacokinetics; *Prostheses and Implants; Biomedical device; Breast cancer; Hyperthermia; Localized chemotherapy; Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide)-based hydrogels; Prodigiosin  
  Abstract This paper presents an implantable encapsulated structure that can deliver localized heating (hyperthermia) and controlled concentrations of prodigiosin (a cancer drug) synthesized by bacteria (Serratia marcesce (subsp. marcescens)). Prototypical Poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) packages, containing well-controlled micro-channels and drug storage compartments, were fabricated along with a drug-storing polymer produced by free radical polymerization of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPA) co-monomers of Acrylamide (AM) and Butyl-methacrylate (BMA). The mechanisms of drug diffusion of PNIPA-base gels were elucidated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was also used to study the heterogeneous porous structure of the PNIPA-based gels. The release exponents, n, of the gels were found to between 0.5 and 0.7. This is in the range expected for Fickian (n=0.5). Deviation from Fickian diffusion was also observed (n>0.5) diffusion. The gel diffusion coefficients were shown to vary between 2.1x10(-12)m(2)/s and 4.8x10(-6)m(2)/s. The implications of the results are then discussed for the localized treatment of cancer via hyperthermia and the controlled delivery of prodigiosin from encapsulated PNIPA-based devices.  
  Call Number Serial 1605  
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Author (up) Harris, A.K.P.; Williamson, N.R.; Slater, H.; Cox, A.; Abbasi, S.; Foulds, I.; Simonsen, H.T.; Leeper, F.J.; Salmond, G.P.C. file  url
openurl 
  Title The Serratia gene cluster encoding biosynthesis of the red antibiotic, prodigiosin, shows species- and strain-dependent genome context variation Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Microbiology (Reading, England) Abbreviated Journal Microbiology  
  Volume 150 Issue Pt 11 Pages 3547-3560  
  Keywords Bacterial Proteins/genetics; Blotting, Southern; DNA Fingerprinting; DNA, Bacterial/chemistry/isolation & purification; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics; Gene Order; *Genes, Bacterial; *Genetic Variation; Molecular Sequence Data; Multigene Family; Open Reading Frames; Peptide Synthases/genetics; Polyketide Synthases/genetics; Prodigiosin/*biosynthesis; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid; Serratia/*genetics/*metabolism; Streptomyces coelicolor/genetics  
  Abstract The prodigiosin biosynthesis gene cluster (pig cluster) from two strains of Serratia (S. marcescens ATCC 274 and Serratia sp. ATCC 39006) has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in heterologous hosts. Sequence analysis of the respective pig clusters revealed 14 ORFs in S. marcescens ATCC 274 and 15 ORFs in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006. In each Serratia species, predicted gene products showed similarity to polyketide synthases (PKSs), non-ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs) and the Red proteins of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Comparisons between the two Serratia pig clusters and the red cluster from Str. coelicolor A3(2) revealed some important differences. A modified scheme for the biosynthesis of prodigiosin, based on the pathway recently suggested for the synthesis of undecylprodigiosin, is proposed. The distribution of the pig cluster within several Serratia sp. isolates is demonstrated and the presence of cryptic clusters in some strains shown. The pig cluster of Serratia marcescens ATCC 274 is flanked by cueR and copA homologues and this configuration is demonstrated in several S. marcescens strains, whilst these genes are contiguous in strains lacking the pig cluster.  
  Call Number Serial 1607  
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Author (up) Lapenda, J.C.; Silva, P.A.; Vicalvi, M.C.; Sena, K.X.F.R.; Nascimento, S.C. file  url
openurl 
  Title Antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin isolated from Serratia marcescens UFPEDA 398 Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal World J Microbiol Biotechnol  
  Volume 31 Issue 2 Pages 399-406  
  Keywords Acinetobacter/drug effects; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacteria/*drug effects/growth & development; Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests; Enterococcus faecalis/drug effects; Escherichia coli/drug effects; Prodigiosin/chemistry/*pharmacology; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects; Serratia marcescens/*chemistry; Spectrophotometry; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects; Streptococcus pyogenes/drug effects  
  Abstract Prodigiosin is an alkaloid and natural red pigment produced by Serratia marcescens. Prodigiosin has antimicrobial, antimalarial and antitumor properties and induces apoptosis in T and B lymphocytes. These properties have piqued the interest of researchers in the fields of medicine, pharmaceutics and different industries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin against pathogenic micro-organisms. The red pigments produced by S. marcescens exhibited absorption at 534 nm, Rf of 0.59 and molecular weight of 323 m/z. Antimicrobial activity was tested against oxacillin-resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Acinetobacter sp. and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. The standard antibiotics employed were ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin and oxacillin. The disc-diffusion tests demonstrated significant inhibition zones for S. aureus (35 +/- 0.6), E. faecalis (22 +/- 1.0) and S. pyogenes (14 +/- 0.6). However, prodigiosin showed resistance to E. coli, P. aeruginosa and acinetobacter, where no significant formation of inhibitory halos were observed. We determined the inhibitory minimum concentrations and bactericidal for 20 strains of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA). The pattern was the antibiotic oxacillin. The minimum inhibitory concentrations observed ranged from 1, 2 and 4.0 mug/mL, respectively, while the minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged from 2, 4, 8 and 16 mug/mL. The S. marcescens prodigiosin produced by showed bactericidal and bacteriostatic effect showing promising antimicrobial activity and suggesting future studies regarding its applicability in antibiotics therapies directed ORSA.  
  Call Number Serial 1672  
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Author (up) Pandey, R.; Chander, R.; Sainis, K.B. file  url
openurl 
  Title Prodigiosins as anti cancer agents: living upto their name Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Current Pharmaceutical Design Abbreviated Journal Curr Pharm Des  
  Volume 15 Issue 7 Pages 732-741  
  Keywords Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry/isolation & purification/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Apoptosis/drug effects; Cell Cycle/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Survival/drug effects; DNA Damage; Gram-Negative Bacteria/metabolism; Humans; Neoplasms/drug therapy; Prodigiosin/chemistry/isolation & purification/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Transcription Factors/metabolism  
  Abstract Prodigiosins are a family of bright red colored bacterial pigment and derive their name from the miraculous (prodigious) events associated with their occurrence. They indeed seem to be living upto their name as a host of activities such as anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer and immunosuppressive have been associated with them. Out of these, immunosuppressive and anti-cancer activity has received more importance as it has a clinical promise. Prodigiosins, isolated mostly from Gram negative bacteria are characterized by a common pyrryldipyrrylmethene structure with varying side chains. The review discusses the mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of compounds. In vitro, prodigiosins have been shown to primarily target the cancer cells independently of the p53 status while little or no effect has been observed on normal cells. In addition, prodigiosins are effective in cancer cells with multidrug resistance phenotype and defects in the apoptotic pathways. These make prodigiosins attractive candidates for further development. Though the molecular targets of prodigiosins have not been clearly defined, they have been found to target different signaling pathways possibly through induction of DNA double strand breaks and/ or neutralization of pH gradients leading to changes in cell cycle proteins and apoptosis. The review will discuss the recent findings related to the mechanism involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of molecules.  
  Call Number Serial 1517  
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