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Author (up) Gruter, T.; Gruter, M.; Carbon, C.-C. file  url
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  Title Neural and genetic foundations of face recognition and prosopagnosia Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Neuropsychology Abbreviated Journal J Neuropsychol  
  Volume 2 Issue Pt 1 Pages 79-97  
  Keywords Autistic Disorder/genetics/physiopathology/psychology; *Face; Humans; Nerve Net/physiopathology; Prosopagnosia/congenital/*genetics/*physiopathology/psychology; Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology; Social Behavior Disorders/genetics/physiopathology/psychology; Visual Perception/physiology  
  Abstract Faces are of essential importance for human social life. They provide valuable information about the identity, expression, gaze, health, and age of a person. Recent face-processing models assume highly interconnected neural structures between different temporal, occipital, and frontal brain areas with several feedback loops. A selective deficit in the visual learning and recognition of faces is known as prosopagnosia, which can be found both in acquired and congenital form. Recently, a hereditary sub-type of congenital prosopagnosia with a very high prevalence rate of 2.5% has been identified. Recent research results show that hereditary prosopagnosia is a clearly circumscribed face-processing deficit with a characteristic set of clinical symptoms. Comparing face processing of people of prosopagnosia with that of controls can help to develop a more conclusive and integrated model of face processing. Here, we provide a summary of the current state of face processing research. We also describe the different types of prosopagnosia and present the set of typical symptoms found in the hereditary type. Finally, we will discuss the implications for future face recognition research.  
  Call Number Serial 1642  
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Author (up) Wecker, N.S.; Kramer, J.H.; Hallam, B.J.; Delis, D.C. file  url
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  Title Mental flexibility: age effects on switching Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Neuropsychology Abbreviated Journal Neuropsychology  
  Volume 19 Issue 3 Pages 345-352  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Aging/*physiology; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Processes/*physiology; Middle Aged; Neuropsychological Tests/statistics & numerical data; Predictive Value of Tests; Problem Solving/*physiology; Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology; Regression Analysis; Verbal Learning/physiology  
  Abstract Mental flexibility is required to track and systematically alternate between 2 response sets. In this study, 719 individuals, 20 to 89 years old, engaged in 3 different tasks that required verbal and nonverbal cognitive switching. Of importance, each task allowed for independent measurement of component skills that are embedded in the higher level tasks. When gender, education, Full Scale IQ, and component skills were partialed out by multiple regression analyses, significant age effects were revealed for each task. This study provides evidence that executive functions--and verbal and nonverbal cognitive switching in particular--are affected by age independently from age-related changes in component skills. The results are discussed in terms of theories of executive control and neurologic correlates across the adult life span.  
  Call Number Serial 2178  
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