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Author (up) Bayliss, C.E.; Waites, W.M. file  url
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  Title Resistance of Serratia marcescens to hydrogen peroxide Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication The Journal of Applied Bacteriology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Bacteriol  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 131-137  
  Keywords Catalase/metabolism; Drug Resistance, Microbial; Hot Temperature; Hydrogen Peroxide/*pharmacology; Serratia marcescens/*drug effects/enzymology/radiation effects; Ultraviolet Rays  
  Abstract Irradiation with ultraviolet (u.v.) light (71 J/m2) reduced the viable count of suspenrsions of Serratia marcescens, grown in a glycerol-salts defined medium, to five in 104 cells. Subsequent incubation of irradiated cells in hydrogen peroxide failed to decrease the survivors, but u.v. irradiation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide reduced the viable count to fewer than two in 106 cells. Cells grown in defined medium with added iron had more measurable catalase activity and were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide alone and to simultaneous treatment with u.v. irradiation and hydrogen peroxide. Cells grown in a non-defined medium contained little iron and measurable catalase activity but were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide. Treatment with toluene, heat killing or sonication increased the catalase activity detected in all cell suspensions and showed that resistance to hydrogen peroxide and to u.v. irradiation in hydrogen peroxide was related to the total catalase activity within cells.  
  Call Number Serial 489  
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Author (up) Bennett, J.W.; Bentley, R. file  url
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  Title Seeing red: the story of prodigiosin Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Advances in Applied Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Adv Appl Microbiol  
  Volume 47 Issue Pages 1-32  
  Keywords Bacteriology/history; Bread/microbiology; History, 18th Century; History, 19th Century; History, 20th Century; Pigments, Biological/*chemistry/history/metabolism/pharmacology; Prodigiosin/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology; Serratia marcescens/*chemistry/metabolism  
  Abstract S. marcescens has played an important role in the history of bacterial taxonomy, in research on the transmission of bacterial aerosols, in the study of emerging nosocomial infections, and in the understanding of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The prodigiosin pigments have intrigued organic chemists and pharmacologists, and play roles in the treatment of infectious diseases such as malaria, and perhaps as immunosuppressant agents. Undecylprodiginine played an important role in the first cloning of a gene, playing a defined role in the biosynthesis of an antibiotic. An O-methyltransferase gene was isolated by complementation and the color of undecylprodiginine was used as the selectable phenotype. The regulation of prodigiosin biosynthesis is complex, being influenced by increased glucose levels and decreased by increased phosphate level. The antibiotic resistance of many strains of S. marcescens is a serious problem with rapid horizontal transfer of drug resistance by plasmids.  
  Call Number Serial 1639  
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Author (up) Buffet-Bataillon, S.; Rabier, V.; Betremieux, P.; Beuchee, A.; Bauer, M.; Pladys, P.; Le Gall, E.; Cormier, M.; Jolivet-Gougeon, A. file  url
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  Title Outbreak of Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit: contaminated unmedicated liquid soap and risk factors Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication The Journal of Hospital Infection Abbreviated Journal J Hosp Infect  
  Volume 72 Issue 1 Pages 17-22  
  Keywords Bacterial Typing Techniques; Case-Control Studies; Cross Infection/*epidemiology/microbiology; DNA Fingerprinting; DNA, Bacterial/genetics; *Disease Outbreaks; Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field; *Environmental Microbiology; Female; Genotype; Hand Disinfection/methods; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Infection Control/methods; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; Male; Risk Factors; Serratia Infections/*epidemiology/microbiology; Serratia marcescens/classification/genetics/*isolation & purification; *Soaps  
  Abstract This study describes an outbreak of Serratia marcescens and its investigation and control in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). During a three-month period, five infants were colonised or infected by a single strain of S. marcescens. A case-control study, culture surveys and pulse-field gel electrophoresis analysis implicated a bottle soap dispenser as a reservoir of S. marcescens (P=0.032). Infants with S. marcescens colonisation or infection were also more likely to have been exposed to a central or percutaneous venous catheter (P=0.05) and had had longer exposure to endotracheal intubation (P=0.05). Soap dispensers are used in many hospitals and may be an unrecognised source of nosocomial infections. This potential source of infection could be reduced by using 'airless' dispensers which have no air intake for the distribution of soap. Prompt intervention and strict adherence to alcoholic hand disinfection were the key factors that led to the successful control of this outbreak.  
  Call Number Serial 1655  
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Author (up) Downing, K.J.; Thomson, J.A. file  url
openurl 
  Title Introduction of the Serratia marcescens chiA gene into an endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens for the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Canadian Journal of Microbiology Abbreviated Journal Can J Microbiol  
  Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 363-369  
  Keywords Chitinases/*genetics/metabolism; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Escherichia coli/genetics; Fabaceae/microbiology; *Pest Control, Biological; Plant Diseases/microbiology; Plants, Medicinal; Plasmids/genetics; Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Pseudomonas fluorescens/*enzymology/*genetics/growth & development/isolation & purification; Repressor Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Rhizoctonia/*growth & development; *Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins; Serratia marcescens/enzymology/*genetics; *Telomere-Binding Proteins  
  Abstract An endophytic strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens was isolated from micropropagated apple plantlets and introduced into beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) via their root tips. It was shown to be present as an endophyte in the roots at a level of 1.2 x 10(5) CFU/g fresh weight. The gene coding for the major chitinase of Serratia marcescens, chiA, was cloned under the control of the tac promoter into the broad-host-range plasmid pKT240 and the integration vector pJFF350. Pseudomonas fluorescens carrying tacchiA either on the plasmid or integrated into the chromosome is an effective biocontrol agent of the phytopathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani on bean seedlings under plant growth chamber conditions.  
  Call Number Serial 1662  
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Author (up) Knothe, H.; Shah, P.; Krcmery, V.; Antal, M.; Mitsuhashi, S. file  url
openurl 
  Title Transferable resistance to cefotaxime, cefoxitin, cefamandole and cefuroxime in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Serratia marcescens Type Journal Article
  Year 1983 Publication Infection Abbreviated Journal Infection  
  Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 315-317  
  Keywords Cefamandole/*pharmacology; Cefotaxime/*pharmacology; Cefoxitin/*pharmacology; Cefuroxime/*pharmacology; Cephalosporins/*pharmacology; *Conjugation, Genetic; Escherichia coli/drug effects/genetics; Humans; Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects/*genetics; Proteus mirabilis/drug effects/genetics; *R Factors; Salmonella typhimurium/drug effects/genetics; Serratia marcescens/drug effects/*genetics  
  Abstract In conjugational crosses, three Klebsiella pneumoniae strains and one Serratia marcescens strain have been demonstrated to transfer resistance determinants to newer types of cephalosporins. While Klebsiella strains donated cefotaxime, cefamandole and cefuroxime resistance to Escherichia coli K-12 recipients, the genetic analysis of exconjugants after the transfer of plasmids from Serratia strains to Proteus or Salmonella recipients showed that the cefoxitin resistance determinant was also co-transferred. In subsequent transfer cycles of this plasmid, cefotaxime and cefoxitin resistance determinants segregated in contrast to the relative stability of plasmids derived from Klebsiella strains in subsequent transfer cycles. From results obtained in this study, it may be concluded that in some strains of nosocomial Enterobacteriaceae, resistance to newer cephalosporins could be transmissible and thus plasmid-located.  
  Call Number Serial 494  
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