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Author (up) Eady, P.E.; Hamilton, L.; Lyons, R.E. file  url
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  Title Copulation, genital damage and early death in Callosobruchus maculatus Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 274 Issue 1607 Pages 247-252  
  Keywords Animals; Female; Fertility/physiology; Genitalia, Female/*injuries; Likelihood Functions; Longevity/*physiology; Male; Semen/physiology; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Weevils/*physiology; Beetle  
  Abstract Antagonistic sexual coevolution stems from the notion that male and female interests over reproduction are in conflict. Such conflicts appear to be particularly obvious when male genital armature inflicts damage to the female reproductive tract resulting in reduced female longevity. However, studies of mating frequency, genital damage and female longevity are difficult to interpret because females not only sustain more genital damage, but also receive more seminal fluid when they engage in multiple copulations. Here, we attempt to disentangle the effects of genital damage and seminal fluid transfer on female longevity in the beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). Males copulating for the sixth time in succession inflicted greater levels of genital damage, but transferred smaller ejaculates in comparison with virgin males. The number of copulations performed by males was negatively related to female fecundity and positively related to female longevity, suggesting a trade-off between fecundity and longevity. However, inclusion of fecundity as a covariate revealed sperm and/or seminal fluid transfer to have a negative impact on female longevity above that caused by the fecundity-longevity trade-off. The consequences of multiple copulations on female longevity were examined. Females that mated twice laid more eggs and died sooner than those that mated once. However, incorporation of fecundity as a covariate into our statistical model removed the effect of female mating frequency on female longevity, indicating that double-mated females suffer greater mortality owing to the trade-off between fecundity and longevity. Males of this species are known to transfer very large ejaculates (up to 8% of their body weight), which may represent a significant nutritional benefit to females. However, the receipt of large ejaculates appears to carry costs. Thus, the interpretation of multiple mating experiments on female longevity and associated functional explanations of polyandry in this species are likely to be complex.  
  Call Number Serial 338  
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Author (up) Jennions, M.D.; Petrie, M. file  url
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  Title Variation in mate choice and mating preferences: a review of causes and consequences Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc  
  Volume 72 Issue 2 Pages 283-327  
  Keywords Animal Communication; Animals; Female; Genetic Variation; Male; Phenotype; Sex Characteristics; Sex Ratio; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology  
  Abstract The aim of this review is to consider variation in mating preferences among females. We define mating preferences as the sensory and behavioural properties that influence the propensity of individuals to mate with certain phenotypes. Two properties of mating preferences can be distinguished: (1) “preference functions'-the order with which an individual ranks prospective mates and (2) ”choosiness'-the effort an individual is prepared to invest in mate assessment. Patterns of mate choices can be altered by changing the costs of choosiness without altering the preference function. We discuss why it is important to study variation in female mating behaviour and identify five main areas of interest: Variation in mating preferences and costs of choosiness could (1) influence the rate and direction of evolution by sexual selection, (2) provide information about the evolutionary history of female preferences, (3) help explain inter-specific differences in the evolution of secondary sexual characteristics, (4) provide information about the level of benefits gained from mate choice, (5) provide information about the underlying mechanisms of mate choice. Variation in mate choice could be due to variability in preference functions, degree of choosiness, or both, and may arise due to genetic differences, developmental trajectories or proximate environmental factors. We review the evidence for genetic variation from genetic studies of heritability and also from data on the repeatability of mate-choice decisions (which can provide information about the upper limits to heritability). There can be problems in interpreting patterns of mate choice in terms of variation in mating preferences and we illustrate two main points. First, some factors can lead to mate choice patterns that mimic heritable variation in preferences and secondly other factors may obscure heritable preferences. These factors are divided into three overlapping classes, environmental, social and the effect of the female phenotype. The environmental factors discussed include predation risk and the costs of sampling; the social factors discussed include the effect of male-male interactions as well as female competition. We review the literature which presents data on how females sample males and discuss the number of cues females use. We conclude that sexual-selection studies have paid far less attention to variation among females than to variation among males, and that there is still much to learn about how females choose males and why different females make different choices. We suggest a number of possible lines for future research.  
  Call Number Serial 1628  
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Author (up) Katsuki, M.; Miyatake, T. file  url
openurl 
  Title Effects of temperature on mating duration, sperm transfer and remating frequency in Callosobruchus chinensis Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Insect Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Insect Physiol  
  Volume 55 Issue 2 Pages 112-115. *Strategian Select*  
  Keywords Animals; Beetles/*physiology; Female; Logistic Models; Male; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Sperm Transport/*physiology; *Temperature; Time Factors; Callosobruchus chinensis  
  Abstract Insect body temperature is usually determined by ambient temperature. Therefore, most biochemical and physiological processes underlying behavioural patterns are temperature dependent. Mating duration is also dependent on temperature, and therefore temperature should influence on sperm transfer and female remating frequency. In the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis, we found negative relationships between ambient temperature and mating duration, sperm transfer and sperm transfer duration. Female remating frequency at lower temperature (17 degrees C) was lower than at other temperatures (25 degrees C and 33 degrees C). The physiological and behavioural significance of these results is discussed. The number of ejaculated sperm was significantly lower at 33 degrees C than at 17 degrees C; the effect of temperature on sperm transfer is discussed in relation to the intensity of female refusal behaviour directed against males.  
  Call Number Serial 1699  
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Author (up) Pai, A.; Bernasconi, G. file  url
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  Title Polyandry and female control: the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol  
  Volume 310 Issue 2 Pages 148-159  
  Keywords Animals; Female; Male; Sex Determination Processes; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Tribolium/*physiology  
  Abstract Females of many animal species are polyandrous, and there is evidence that they can control pre- and post-mating events. There has been a growing interest in consequences of polyandry for male and female reproductive success and offspring fitness, and its evolutionary significance. In several taxa, females exhibit mate choice both before and after mating and can influence the paternity of their offspring, enhancing offspring number and quality, but potentially countering male interests. Studying female mating biology and in particular post-copulatory female control mechanisms thus promises to yield insights into sexual selection and the potential of male-female coevolution. Here, we highlight the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), a storage pest, as a model system to study polyandry, and review studies addressing the effects of polyandry on male sperm competitive ability and female control of post-mating events. These studies show that the outcome of sperm competition in the red flour beetle is influenced by both male and female traits. Furthermore, recent advances suggest that sexual conflict may have shaped reproductive traits in this species.  
  Call Number Serial 1627  
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