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Author (up) Hazuda, H.P.; Comeaux, P.J.; Stern, M.P.; Haffner, S.M.; Eifler, C.W.; Rosenthal, M. file  url
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  Title A comparison of three indicators for identifying Mexican Americans in epidemiologic research. Methodological findings from the San Antonio Heart Study Type Journal Article
  Year 1986 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 123 Issue 1 Pages 96-112  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; *Epidemiologic Methods; Female; Hispanic Americans/*classification; Humans; Male; Mexico/ethnology; Middle Aged; Sex Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Texas  
  Abstract Because the issue of how to empirically identify Mexican Americans in health-related research is still unresolved, the authors compared the performance of three indicators for identifying Mexican Americans across five distinct population subgroups: men and women in two age strata, and residents in low, middle, and high socioeconomic neighborhoods. Individual surname had the lowest sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values in the pooled population sample and varied the most widely on these parameters across population subgroups. Parental surnames, which are available on vital statistics and could easily be added to other health records used in secondary analyses, offered a significant improvement over individual surname in classifying persons as Mexican American. The San Antonio Heart Study (SAHS) algorithm, a nine-item indicator which uses parental surnames, birthplace of both parents, self-declared ethnic identity, and ethnic background of grandparents, had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values and varied the least on these parameters across different sex, age, and socioeconomic status population subgroups. The performance of all indicators was lower at the higher socioeconomic status levels. The findings suggest that it may be useful to use parental surnames as an indicator for Mexican-American ethnicity in research involving vital statistics and to add parental surnames to other health records frequently used in secondary analyses. Since the SAHS algorithm can be adapted for use with non-Mexican origin Hispanic subgroups, it may be a useful indicator for Mexican-American (or other Hispanic) ethnicity in survey research.  
  Call Number Serial 1381  
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Author (up) Romero, C.D.; Chopin, S.F.; Buck, G.; Martinez, E.; Garcia, M.; Bixby, L. file  url
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  Title Antibacterial properties of common herbal remedies of the southwest Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Journal of Ethnopharmacology Abbreviated Journal J Ethnopharmacol  
  Volume 99 Issue 2 Pages 253-257  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Gram-Negative Bacteria/*drug effects; Gram-Positive Bacteria/*drug effects; Humans; Medicine, Traditional; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; *Phytotherapy; Plant Components, Aerial; Plant Extracts/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Plant Roots; *Plants, Medicinal; Texas  
  Abstract Curanderismo, widely practiced in the southwest, is an alternative medical system that has been neglected by scientific research. This project analyzed the antibiotic properties of 23 common herbal remedies used in South Texas to treat wounds and infections. Ethanolic tinctures and aqueous extracts of each plant were prepared and applied to blank diffusion disks. These disks were desiccated and used in Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility tests on three bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Control disks contained solvent only. The efficacy of the tinctures and aqueous extracts was compared to that of commercially prepared antibiotic diffusion disks. No inhibition was observed with the aqueous extracts. The various tincture-saturated disks produced zones of clearance ranging from 1 to 5 mm. Ten plants consistently inhibited bacterial growth of Staphylococcus aureus. None of the plants tested produced consistent inhibition of the two Gram-negative species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. No zones of clearance were produced by the solvent-only control disks. The zones of clearance produced by commercial antibiotics were, on average, larger and more uniform than those produced by the tincture disks. Thus, it appears that some of the herbal remedies used in folk medicine are potentially effective antibacterial agents against Staphylococcus aureus.  
  Call Number Serial 1529  
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