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Author (up) Gruter, T.; Gruter, M.; Carbon, C.-C. file  url
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  Title Neural and genetic foundations of face recognition and prosopagnosia Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Neuropsychology Abbreviated Journal J Neuropsychol  
  Volume 2 Issue Pt 1 Pages 79-97  
  Keywords Autistic Disorder/genetics/physiopathology/psychology; *Face; Humans; Nerve Net/physiopathology; Prosopagnosia/congenital/*genetics/*physiopathology/psychology; Recognition (Psychology)/*physiology; Social Behavior Disorders/genetics/physiopathology/psychology; Visual Perception/physiology  
  Abstract Faces are of essential importance for human social life. They provide valuable information about the identity, expression, gaze, health, and age of a person. Recent face-processing models assume highly interconnected neural structures between different temporal, occipital, and frontal brain areas with several feedback loops. A selective deficit in the visual learning and recognition of faces is known as prosopagnosia, which can be found both in acquired and congenital form. Recently, a hereditary sub-type of congenital prosopagnosia with a very high prevalence rate of 2.5% has been identified. Recent research results show that hereditary prosopagnosia is a clearly circumscribed face-processing deficit with a characteristic set of clinical symptoms. Comparing face processing of people of prosopagnosia with that of controls can help to develop a more conclusive and integrated model of face processing. Here, we provide a summary of the current state of face processing research. We also describe the different types of prosopagnosia and present the set of typical symptoms found in the hereditary type. Finally, we will discuss the implications for future face recognition research.  
  Call Number Serial 1642  
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Author (up) Sarkamo, T.; Soto, D. file  url
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  Title Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences Abbreviated Journal Ann N Y Acad Sci  
  Volume 1252 Issue Pages 266-281  
  Keywords Auditory Perception/physiology; Cognition/physiology; Emotions/physiology; Functional Neuroimaging; Humans; Models, Neurological; Models, Psychological; *Music Therapy; Neuronal Plasticity/physiology; Neurosciences; Stroke/physiopathology/psychology/rehabilitation/*therapy; Visual Perception/physiology  
  Abstract Music is an enjoyable leisure activity that also engages many emotional, cognitive, and motor processes in the brain. Here, we will first review previous literature on the emotional and cognitive effects of music listening in healthy persons and various clinical groups. Then we will present findings about the short- and long-term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects. First, our results indicate that listening to pleasant music can have a short-term facilitating effect on visual awareness in patients with visual neglect, which is associated with functional coupling between emotional and attentional brain regions. Second, daily music listening can improve auditory and verbal memory, focused attention, and mood as well as induce structural gray matter changes in the early poststroke stage. The psychological and neural mechanisms potentially underlying the rehabilitating effect of music after stroke are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 1371  
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Author (up) Shrestha, R.; Trauger-Querry, B.; Loughrin, A.; Appleby, B.S. file  url
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  Title Visual art therapy in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Neurocase Abbreviated Journal Neurocase  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 243-247  
  Keywords Adult; Art Therapy/*methods; Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging/pathology; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome/diagnostic imaging/pathology/*rehabilitation; Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Female; Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/pharmacokinetics; Humans; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Positron-Emission Tomography; Treatment Outcome; Visual Perception/physiology; Prion disease; art therapy; disease progression; patient outcome; sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease  
  Abstract This paper describes the diagnostic and treatment utility of visual art therapy in a case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Visual art therapy was compared longitudinally with clinical and neuroimaging data over five-month period in an autopsy-confirmed case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of MM2-cortical subtype. Art therapy sessions and content were useful in ascertaining neuropsychiatric symptoms during the course of her illness. Art therapy offered a unique emotional and cognitive outlet as illness progressed. Patients and families affected by sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may benefit from art therapy despite the rapidly progressive nature of the illness. Art therapy can also be useful for assessment of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by healthcare professionals.  
  Call Number Serial 2087  
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