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Author (up) A/Rahman, S.H.; Mohamedani, A.A.; Mirgani, E.M.; Ibrahim, A.M. file  url
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  Title Gender aspects and women's participation in the control and management of malaria in central Sudan Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Social Science & Medicine (1982) Abbreviated Journal Soc Sci Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 10 Pages 1433-1446  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Animals; Consumer Participation--methods, psychology, statistics & numerical data; Cost of Illness; Developing Countries--economics, statistics & numerical data; Diarrhea--epidemiology, prevention & control; Female; Health Education--manpower, methods; Humans; Insecticides--adverse effects; Malaria, Falciparum--economics, epidemiology, prevention & control; Male; Medicine, Traditional; Middle Aged; Mosquito Control--methods; Prevalence; Program Evaluation; Sanitation; Schistosomiasis--epidemiology, prevention & control; Sudan--epidemiology; Superstitions; Treatment Outcome; Women; Women's Health  
  Abstract This work was designed to study the contribution of women in central Sudan in the control and management of malaria with particular emphasis on gender-related aspects that define women's role and participation. The Blue Nile Health Project (BNHP 1980-1990) was launched in 1980 mainly for control of water associated diseases in central Sudan. The BNHP model was chosen to conduct this work. The study showed that women were actively involved in the implementation of the BNHP strategies as health instructors (murshidat) who constituted 75% of the staff of BNHP unit of health education, as members of village health committees (VHC) where they constituted 40% of the VHC members and also as recipients of the project services. All murshidat were interviewed whereas multistage random sampling for VHC members and recipient women in 40 villages was used to select a sample which was interviewed. The results showed that the murshidat and VHC women members played a major role in the motivation, organization and health education of local communities prior to campaigns of environmental sanitation and vector control. Household commitments and difficulties in communication with the public were the main gender-related factors that contributed negatively to women's activities. Cases of malaria have more considerable socio-economic impact than other common diseases, especially with regard to women's household commitments and work. Recipient women were more concerned with aspects of self protection, management of family cases of malaria and health education programmes. They were less involved in drying mosquito breeding sites and spraying activities of insecticides which had been reluctantly accepted because of allergy and bad odour. Although the majority of women considered antimalarials to be less harmful than effects of malaria itself on pregnancy, they did not realize the role of malaria chemoprophylaxis during pregnancy. This needs more health education. The study showed that the BNHP programme was very successful in recruiting women in control and management programmes. Therefore, health planners are urged to persuade the subordinated communities of women in many African countries like Sudan to play a more active role in the health programmes and welfare of their communities.  
  Call Number Serial 169  
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Author (up) Senarath, U.; Gunawardena, N.S. file  url
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  Title Women's autonomy in decision making for health care in South Asia Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health / Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health Abbreviated Journal Asia Pac J Public Health  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 137-143  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Asia, Western; Contraception; *Decision Making; Female; Health Services/*utilization; Healthcare Disparities; Humans; *Personal Autonomy; Prejudice; Residence Characteristics; Socioeconomic Factors; Women's Health/*ethnology  
  Abstract This article aims to discuss women's autonomy in decision making on health care, and its determinants in 3 South Asian countries, using nationally representative surveys. Women's participation either alone or jointly in household decisions on their own health care was considered as an indicator of women's autonomy in decision making. The results revealed that decisions of women's health care were made without their participation in the majority of Nepal (72.7%) and approximately half of Bangladesh (54.3%) and Indian (48.5%) households. In Sri Lanka, decision making for contraceptive use was a collective responsibility in the majority (79.7%). Women's participation in decision making significantly increased with age, education, and number of children. Women who were employed and earned cash had a stronger say in household decision making than women who did not work or worked not for cash. Rural and poor women were less likely to be involved in decision making than urban or rich women.  
  Call Number Serial 1199  
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Author (up) Xu, Y.; Shapiro, C.L. file  url
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  Title Rationale for mitomycin and irinotecan use in advanced breast cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Oncology (Williston Park)  
  Volume 17 Issue 5 Suppl 5 Pages 25-28  
  Keywords Antibiotics, Antineoplastic/*administration & dosage; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/*administration & dosage; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use; Breast Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Camptothecin/*administration & dosage/*analogs & derivatives; Clinical Trials as Topic; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Female; Humans; Maximum Tolerated Dose; Mitomycin/*administration & dosage; Women's Health  
  Abstract For women who develop hormone-refractory metastatic breast cancer, or who have breast cancers that are not estrogen-dependent (hormone receptor-negative), treatment with chemotherapy is the best option. Mitomycin (Mutamycin) and irinotecan (CPT-11, Camptosar) have marginal activity in breast cancer. However, the sequential administration of mitomycin and irinotecan appears to have synergism in preclinical studies, as mitomycin upregulates the level of topoisomerase I, the target of irinotecan. A phase I clinical trial of pharmacologically based sequential administration of mitomycin on day 1 followed by irinotecan on days 2 and 8 was performed in previously treated solid tumor patients. In five heavily pretreated women with breast cancer, one patient had a complete response, one patient had a partial response, and one patient had stable disease. Upregulation of topoisomerase I gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was observed in two of the responding patients. A phase II trial of mitomycin followed by irinotecan in women with previously treated metastatic, inflammatory, or locally advanced breast cancer is currently ongoing.  
  Call Number Serial 194  
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