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Author (up) Cutler, B.L.; Dexter, H.R.; Penrod, S.D. file  url
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  Title Expert testimony and jury decision making: An empirical analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 1989 Publication Behavioral Sciences & the Law Abbreviated Journal Behav. Sci. Law  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 215-225  
  Keywords  
  Abstract This experiment examines the influence of expert psychological testimony on juror decision making in eyewitness identification cases. Experienced jurors and undergraduate mock jurors viewed versions of a videotaped trial, rated the credibility of the eyewitness and the strength of the prosecution's and defense's cases, and rendered verdicts. In the absence of expert testimony jurors were insensitive to eyewitness evidence. Expert testimony improved juror sensitivity to eyewitness evidence without making them more skeptical about the accuracy of the eyewitness identification. Few differences emerged between the experienced jurors and undergraduate mock jurors.

Subject Headings: Expert testimony; Jury decision making
 
  Call Number Serial 2318  
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Author (up) Levenson, J.S.; D'Amora, D.A.; Hern, A.L. file  url
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  Title Megan's Law and its impact on community re-entry for sex offenders Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Behavioral Sciences & the law Abbreviated Journal Behav Sci Law  
  Volume 25 Issue 4 Pages 587-602  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Child; Child Abuse, Sexual/*legislation & jurisprudence/prevention & control; Connecticut; Data Collection; Female; Humans; Indiana; Male; *Mandatory Reporting; Middle Aged; Registries; *Residence Characteristics; *Social Adjustment  
  Abstract Community notification, known as “Megan's Law,” provides the public with information about known sex offenders in an effort to assist parents and potential victims to protect themselves from dangerous predators. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of community notification on the lives of registered sex offenders. Two hundred and thirty-nine sex offenders in Connecticut and Indiana were surveyed. The negative consequences that occurred with the greatest frequency included job loss, threats and harassment, property damage, and suffering of household members. A minority of sex offenders reported housing disruption or physical violence following community notification. The majority experienced psychosocial distress such as depression, shame, and hopelessness. Recommendations are made for community notification policies that rely on empirically derived risk assessment classification systems in order to better inform the public about sex offenders' danger while minimizing the obstacles that interfere with successful community reintegration.  
  Call Number Serial 1964  
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Author (up) Wolman, R.; Taylor, K. file  url
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  Title Psychological effects of custody disputes on children Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication Behavioral Sciences & the law Abbreviated Journal Behav Sci Law  
  Volume 9 Issue 4 Pages 399-417  
  Keywords Adult; Analysis of Variance; Child; *Child Custody/legislation & jurisprudence; *Child Psychology; Divorce; Family; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Massachusetts; Psychological Tests; Regression Analysis; Risk Factors  
  Abstract This two-group, repeated measures examination of the psychological impact of child custody contests on children reports a subset of data from an ongoing longitudinal study of 95 children and their parents from 43 divorcing families. The authors report clinical observations concerning children's experience of custody litigation, as well as comparisons of baseline and post-test responses of contested and uncontested groups on measures of locus of control, separation anxiety and family concept. Contested children exhibited significantly greater internality of control orientation than the normative sample. Contested children's test scores also suggested significantly less separation anxiety and significantly more positive family concept than the uncontested group at post-test. The implications of these unanticipated findings are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 288  
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