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Author: Ahlgren, I.F.; Ahlgren, C.E.

Description: Soil dilution plate counts on selective media for bacteria, streptomycetes, and fungi were made at intervals before and after two prescribed burns on 10—acre jack pine tracts. Carbon dioxide determinations were also made. These tracts were compared with similar tracts cut and unburned and uncut and unburned. Three—year results are given. The number and activity of most microorganisms decreased immediately after fire but rose abruptly to a very high level after the first rainfall following burning. This increase is believed caused by the leaching of ash minerals. Depth and extent of the effects were influenced by intensity of fire and moisture conditions. Number and activity of organisms were generally lower in burned soil the second growing season after fire. Some effects were still noticeable the third growing season. Streptomycete populations were greatly increased the third growing season. Rainfall also caused a fluctuation of microbial populations on the unburned tracts.

Title: Effects of Prescribed Burning on Soil Microorganisms in a Minnesota Jack Pine Forest

Subject headings: ash minerals, bacteria, burned, burning, burns,carbon dioxide, cut, fire, forest, fungi, microbial, microorganisms, moisture,

Year: 1965

Publication: Ecology

Volume: 46

Issue: 3

Pages: 304-310

Full text: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1936333

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=15668294714005931388&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0012-9658

ISBN:
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Author: Airoldi, L.; Balata, D.; Beck, M.W.

Description: Structurally complex habitats are becoming rarer across temperate marine environments; indeed the coastal and marine world is getting flatter. In some cases marine habitats are lost entirely (e.g., wetlands are filled), but in many cases the loss is a gradual transition from a more complex to a less complex habitat (i.e., a change from canopy-forming to turf forming algae). We explore the multiple ways habitat loss affects marine species diversity, and propose a conceptual model that identifies the main interactions and feedbacks between these processes. The loss of habitat structure generally leads to lower abundances (biomasses) and often to declines in species richness. There is often also a suite of colonizing species that prosper from these transitions. These sets of expanding species can amplify the changes to the system, cause variable effects on species richness and other components of diversity, feed back to affect the various components of habitat loss (e.g. maintain new environmental conditions) and prevent the recovery of the system. Less well studied are the effects on between-habitat (β) diversity and functional diversity. We argue that we need to understand these latter changes to better manage and conserve the structure and function of ecosystems and the diverse services that humans continue to expect from them. Calling for more of the approaches and thinking that John Gray championed we discuss how this work can focus efforts in research, conservation, restoration and management.

Title: The Gray Zone: Relationships between habitat loss and marine diversity and their applications in conservation

Subject headings: Conservation; Habitat loss; Marine systems; Species diversity

Year: 2008

Publication: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology

Volume: 366

Issue: 1-2

Pages: 8-15

Full text: http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022098108003249

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=13161012659946808277&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0022-0981

ISBN:
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Author: Akhtar, N.; Dunham, F.; Dunham, P.J.

Description: Maternal directiveness, assessed by the mother's use of prescriptives, is correlated with slow vocabulary development. As prescriptives are most often used to redirect a child's attention to a different object or activity, it is hypothesized that attentional regulation underlies this negative relationship. In the present study, twelve mothers were videotaped interacting with their children aged 1;1, and 100 maternal utterances were coded for pragmatic intent. Prescriptives were coded as either changing (LEADING) or FOLLOWING the child's focus of attention. Only the frequency of mothers' FOLLOW-prescriptives correlated significantly with a productive vocabulary measure taken at 1;10. This correlation was high and positive, indicating that, given joint focus, directing a 13-month-old's behaviour can have beneficial effects on subsequent vocabulary development.

Title: Directive interactions and early vocabulary development: the role of joint attentional focus

Subject headings: Directiveness; Prescriptives; Vocabulary development

Year: 1991

Publication: Journal of Child Language

Volume: 18

Issue: 01

Pages: 41

Full text: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-child-language/article/directive-interactions-and-early-vocabulary-development-the-role-of-joint-attentional-focus/C25524B80E94DFE15D5322AB2034322E

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=17659142399554229106&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0305-0009

ISBN:
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Author: Akhurst, R.J.; Hata, A.

Description: Many drugs that target transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signalling have been developed, some of which have reached Phase III clinical trials for a number of disease applications. Preclinical and clinical studies indicate the utility of these agents in fibrosis and oncology, particularly in augmentation of existing cancer therapies, such as radiation and chemotherapy, as well as in tumour vaccines. There are also reports of specialized applications, such as the reduction of vascular symptoms of Marfan syndrome. Here, we consider why the TGFbeta signalling pathway is a drug target, the potential clinical applications of TGFbeta inhibition, the issues arising with anti-TGFbeta therapy and how these might be tackled using personalized approaches to dosing, monitoring of biomarkers as well as brief and/or localized drug-dosing regimens.

Title: Targeting the TGFbeta signalling pathway in disease

Subject headings: Animals; Drug Delivery Systems/*methods; Humans; Protein Binding/physiology; Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Signal Transduction/drug effects/*physiology; Transforming Growth Factor beta/*antagonists & inhibitors/*physiology

Year: 2012

Publication: Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery

Volume: 11

Issue: 10

Pages: 790-811

Full text: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3520610/

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=2590525134124138387&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 1474-1776

ISBN:
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Author: Akiskal, H.S.

Description: Based on the author's work and that of collaborators, as well as other contemporaneous research, this article reaffirms the existence of a broad bipolar spectrum between the extremes of psychotic manic-depressive illness and strictly defined unipolar depression. The alternation of mania and melancholia beginning in the juvenile years is one of the most classic descriptions in clinical medicine that has come to us from Greco-Roman times. French alienists in the middle of the nineteenth century and Kraepelin at the turn of that century formalized it into manic-depressive psychosis. In the pre-DSM-III era during the 1960s and 1970s, North American psychiatrists rarely diagnosed the psychotic forms of the disease; now, there is greater recognition that most excited psychoses with a biphasic course, including many with schizo-affective features, belong to the bipolar spectrum. Current data also support Kraepelin's delineation of mixed states, which frequently take on psychotic proportions. However, full syndromal intertwining of depressive and manic states into dysphoric or mixed mania--as emphasized in DSM-IV--is relatively uncommon; depressive symptoms in the midst of mania are more representative of mixed states. DSM-IV also does not formally recognize hypomanic symptomatology that intrudes into major depressive episodes and gives rise to agitated depressive and/or anxious, dysphoric, restless depressions with flight of ideas. Many of these mixed depressive states arise within the setting of an attenuated bipolar spectrum characterized by major depressive episodes and soft signs of bipolarity. DSM-IV conventions are most explicit for the bipolar II subtype with major depressive and clear-cut spontaneous hypomanic episodes; temperamental cyclothymia and hyperthymia receive insufficient recognition as potential factors that could lead to switching from depression to bipolar I disorder and, in vulnerable subjects, to predominantly depressive cycling. In the main, rapid-cycling and mixed states are distinct. Nonetheless, there exist ultrarapid-cycling forms where morose, labile moods with irritable, mixed features constitute patients' habitual self and, for that reason, are often mistaken for "borderline" personality disorder. Clearly, more formal research needs to be conducted in this temperamental interface between more classic bipolar and unipolar disorders. The clinical stakes, however, are such that a narrow concept of bipolar disorder would deprive many patients with lifelong temperamental dysregulation and depressive episodes of the benefits of mood-regulating agents.

Title: The prevalent clinical spectrum of bipolar disorders: beyond DSM-IV

Subject headings: Bipolar Disorder/classification/*diagnosis/psychology; Cyclothymic Disorder/classification/diagnosis/psychology; Depressive Disorder/classification/diagnosis/psychology; Diagnosis, Differential; Humans; *Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Psychotic Disorders/classification/diagnosis/psychology

Year: 1996

Publication: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology

Volume: 16

Issue: 2 Suppl 1

Pages: 4s-14s

Full text: http://journals.lww.com/psychopharmacology/Abstract/1996/04001/The_Prevalent_Clinical_Spectrum_of_Bipolar.2.aspx

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=8929741021631184411&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0271-0749

ISBN:
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Author: Al-Jibori, S.A.; Al-Jibori, M.H.S.; Hogarth, G.

Description: Palladium(II) and platinum(II) thiosaccharinate complexes [M(1-tsac)2(2-Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2}] (M = Pd, Pt; n = 14) have been prepared, palladium complexes from reaction of [Pd(tsac)2]·H2O with diphosphanes and platinum complexes from addition of thiosaccharin to [PtCl22-Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2}] in the presence of triethylamine. All complexes have been fully characterized and the crystal structures of [Pd1-tsac)2(2-dppp)] (n = 3) and [Pt1-tsac)2(2-dppm)] (n = 1) have been determined confirming that thiosaccharinate ligands are S-bound. The larger ring complexes (n = 3, 4) are fluxional in solution being attributed to the conformational flexibility of the diphosphane backbones The bis(diphosphane) complexes, [M(1-tsac)2(1-dppm)2] (M = Pd, Pt), have also been prepared upon treatment of [Pd(tsac)2]·H2O with two equivalents of dppm or addition of thiosaccharin to [Pt(2-dppm)2]Cl2 in the presence of triethylamine in which the diphosphanes bind in a monodentate fashion. Both are highly fluxional in solution, changes in the 31P{1H} NMR spectra as a function of temperature being interpreted as the exchange of bound and unbound phosphorus atoms.

Title: Thiosaccharinate binding to palladium(II) and platinum(II): Synthesis and molecular structures of sulfur-bound complexes [M([kappa]1-tsac)2([kappa]2-diphosphane)]

Subject headings: Platinum; Palladium; Thiosaccharinate; Diphosphane; X-ray crystallography

Year: 2013

Publication: Inorganica Chimica Acta

Volume: 398

Issue:

Pages: 117-123

Full text: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Subhi_Al-Jibori/publication/256731767_Thiosaccharinate_binding_to_palladium(II)_and_platinum(II)_Synthesis_and_molecular_structures_of_sulfur-bound_complexes_M(1-tsac)2(2-diphosphane)/links/0c960534c0cd1913ba000000.pdf

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=17411976306647384661&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0020-1693

ISBN:
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Author: Al-Saffar, Z.Y.; Grainger, J.N.R.; Aldrich, J.

Description: 1.
1. The mean durations of development in the pupae of Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) and their survival were measured at combinations of six constant temperatures (15, 20, 22.5, 25, 27.5 and 30°C) and up to 11 levels of relative humidity. The thermal survival range for the pupae is between 15 and 30°C, and the humidity viable range is between 60 and 100% RH.
2.
2. The percentage water loss of the pupae was measured at six constant temperatures and four levels of relative humidity. There was a rapid increase in the percentage of water lost during the first 24 h exposure at all tested conditions. However, pupae reared at 100% RH at each constant temperature, sustained the lowest water loss. The percentage water loss increased as temperature increased, as humidity decreased and also with time.
3.
3. The duration of larval development studied at six constant temperatures (15, 20, 22.5, 25, 27.5 and 30°C) was inversely related to temperature. A wide range of alternating temperature regimes had a small, though statistically significant, accelerative effect on larval developmental time. Thus, the present results may be used as a basis for modelling development under changing temperatures, with the assumption that the developmental rate is nearly identical to that from a series of constant temperatures.

Title: Temperature and humidity affecting development, survival and weight loss of the pupal stage of Drosophila melanogaster, and the influence of alternating temperature on the larvae

Subject headings: Temperature effects; humidity effects; D. melanogaster; development rate; modelling development; percentage water loss

Year: 1996

Publication: Journal of Thermal Biology

Volume: 21

Issue: 5-6

Pages: 389-396

Full text: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306456596000253

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=8394721771808141278&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0306-4565

ISBN:
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Author: Alam, S.M.; Aussedat, B.; Vohra, Y.; Ryan Meyerhoff, R.; Cale, E.M.; Walkowicz, W.E.; Radakovich, N.A.; Anasti, K.; Armand, L.; Parks, R.; Sutherland, L.; Scearce, R.; Joyce, M.G.; Pancera, M.; Druz, A.; Georgiev, I.S.; Von Holle, T.; Eaton, A.; Fox, C.; Reed, S.G.; Louder, M.; Bailer, R.T.; Morris, L.; Abdool-Karim, S.S.; Cohen, M.; Liao, H.-X.; Montefiori, D.C.; Park, P.K.; Fernandez-Tejada, A.; Wiehe, K.; Santra, S.; Kepler, T.B.; Saunders, K.O.; Sodroski, J.; Kwong, P.D.; Mascola, J.R.; Bonsignori, M.; Moody, M.A.; Danishefsky, S.; Haynes, B.F.

Description: A goal for an HIV-1 vaccine is to overcome virus variability by inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). One key target of bnAbs is the glycan-polypeptide at the base of the envelope (Env) third variable loop (V3). We have designed and synthesized a homogeneous minimal immunogen with high-mannose glycans reflective of a native Env V3-glycan bnAb epitope (Man9-V3). V3-glycan bnAbs bound to Man9-V3 glycopeptide and native-like gp140 trimers with similar affinities. Fluorophore-labeled Man9-V3 glycopeptides bound to bnAb memory B cells and were able to be used to isolate a V3-glycan bnAb from an HIV-1-infected individual. In rhesus macaques, immunization with Man9-V3 induced V3-glycan-targeted antibodies. Thus, the Man9-V3 glycopeptide closely mimics an HIV-1 V3-glycan bnAb epitope and can be used to isolate V3-glycan bnAbs.

Title: Mimicry of an HIV broadly neutralizing antibody epitope with a synthetic glycopeptide

Subject headings:

Year: 2017

Publication: Science Translational Medicine

Volume: 9

Issue: 381

Pages:

Full text: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/381/eaai7521

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=4765419288326545429&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 1946-6234

ISBN:
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Author: Alapin, I.; Fichten, C.S.; Libman, E.; Creti, L.; Bailes, S.; Wright, J.

Description: We compared good sleepers with minimally and highly distressed poor sleepers on three measures of daytime functioning: self-reported fatigue, sleepiness, and cognitive inefficiency. In two samples (194 older adults, 136 college students), we tested the hypotheses that (1) poor sleepers experience more problems with daytime functioning than good sleepers, (2) highly distressed poor sleepers report greater impairment in functioning during the day than either good sleepers or minimally distressed poor sleepers, (3) daytime symptoms are more closely related to psychological adjustment and to psychologically laden sleep variables than to quantitative sleep parameters, and (4) daytime symptoms are more closely related to longer nocturnal wake times than to shorter sleep times. Results in both samples indicated that poor sleepers reported more daytime difficulties than good sleepers. While low- and high-distress poor sleepers did not differ on sleep parameters, highly distressed poor sleepers reported consistently more difficulty in functioning during the day and experienced greater tension and depression than minimally distressed poor sleepers. Severity of all three daytime problems was generally significantly and positively related to poor psychological adjustment, psychologically laden sleep variables, and, with the exception of sleepiness, to quantitative sleep parameters. Results are used to discuss discrepancies between experiential and quantitative measures of daytime functioning.

Title: How is good and poor sleep in older adults and college students related to daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and ability to concentrate?

Subject headings: Adaptation, Psychological; Adult; Aged; Attention; Circadian Rhythm--physiology; Cognition Disorders--diagnosis, etiology; Disorders of Excessive Somnolence--diagnosis, etiology; Fatigue--diagnosis, etiology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Severity of Illness Index; Sleep--physiology; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders--complications, diagnosis; Students; Universities; Wakefulness--physiology

Year: 2000

Publication: Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Volume: 49

Issue: 5

Pages: 381-390

Full text: http://www.adaptech.org/cfichten/abHowisgoodandpoorsleep.pdf

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=10288866222302193012&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0022-3999

ISBN:
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Author: Alarcon, G.M.; Edwards, J.M.; Clark, P.C.

Description: Coping was hypothesized to explain additional variance in first year grade point averages (GPAs) controlling for cognitive ability and conscientiousness. First year GPAs were assessed as criterion for performance in the first year. Results indicate active coping, denial, behavioral disengagement, and alcohol disengagement are related to first year GPA. Denial and alcohol disengagement coping strategies were significant predictors and negatively related to first year GPA in the final regression equation controlling for cognitive ability and conscientiousness. Latent growth modeling analysis demonstrated cognitive ability predicted both the intercept and slope of first year GPA. Conscientiousness was a predictor of initial GPA but not change. Lastly, coping was a significant predictor of change in GPA. Implications for research and theory are discussed.

Title: Coping strategies and first year performance in postsecondary education

Subject headings: Coping; GPA; Grade point average; College; University; First year

Year: 2013

Publication: Journal of Applied Social Psychology

Volume: 43

Issue: 8

Pages: 1676-1685

Full text: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jasp.12120/full

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=11474493701158059702&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0021-9029

ISBN:





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