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Author: Alfermann, D.; Stambulova, N.; Zemaityte, A.

Description: Objectives: To assess the cognitive, emotional, and behavioural consequences of sport career termination of national and international level athletes in three nations.
Design and methods: Athletes of Germany (n=88), Lithuania (n=65), and Russia (n=101) were asked to describe in retrospect their reactions to career termination. The Athletic Retirement Questionnaire developed by the first two authors and presented in three corresponding languages was used. Planning of retirement and national identity served as independent variables. Dependent variables were reasons and circumstances for career termination, participants’ emotional reactions, coping reactions, athletic identity during and after sport career, and adjustment to life after career termination.
Results: Analyses of variance revealed significant main effects of retirement planning and national identity on most dependent variables. Planning of retirement contributed to significantly better cognitive, emotional, and behavioural adaptation. In addition, high athletic identity contributed to less positive reactions to retirement and to more problems in the adaptation process. The emotional reactions of Russian and Lithuanian athletes were similar, but differed from the German athletes who, in general, showed more positive and lesser negative emotions after retirement. Though accepting the reality of retirement was the most often used coping strategy among all participants, Lithuanian athletes showed more denial and Russian athletes more distraction strategies after retirement than the other nations.
Discussion: The results are discussed with regard to athletes’ readiness for career transition in different social and cultural environments. Recommendations are given on how to help athletes to prepare for and to cope with career termination.

Title: Reactions to sport career termination: a cross-national comparison of German, Lithuanian, and Russian athletes

Subject headings: Sport Career Termination; Coping; Cross-national Comparison; Counselling

Publication year: 2004

Journal or book title: Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Volume: 5

Issue: 1

Pages: 61-75

Find the full text : http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S146902920200050X

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 628

ISSN: 1469-0292

ISBN:
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Author: Allen, B.; Timmer, S.G.; Urquiza, A.J.

Description: Children with histories of child abuse and neglect, particularly children residing in foster or adoptive homes, are commonly considered by many professionals to need “attachment therapy” in order to address emotional and behavioral needs. However, evidence-based treatments rarely utilize an attachment-based justification outside of the infancy through preschooler age range. In actuality, many evidence-based treatments can be understood through the lens of attachment theory. This paper reviews the tenets of an attachment-based approach to treatment and describes how one evidence-based treatment, Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), conforms to all expectations and requirements prescribed by attachment theory and research. Next, pilot data from an open trial of PCIT with a sample of adopted children and their adoptive caregivers (n = 85) are provided. Results demonstrate significant improvements in positive parenting techniques, reductions in parenting stress, and reductions in externalizing and internalizing concerns among the children. These results are discussed in the context of improving the quality of care for children often described as in need of “attachment therapy.”

Title: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as an attachment-based intervention: Theoretical rationale and pilot data with adopted children

Subject headings: Attachment; Evidence-based treatment; Parent–Child Interaction Therapy; Adoption

Publication year: 2014

Journal or book title: Children and Youth Services Review

Volume: 47

Issue:

Pages: 334-341

Find the full text : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740914003715

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 955

ISSN: 0190-7409

ISBN:
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Author: Allen, J.Y.; Haley, W.E.; Small, B.J.; Schonwetter, R.S.; McMillan, S.C.

Description: BACKGROUND: Informal caregivers are an integral part of end-of-life care for hospice patients with cancer. Although adjustment following loss is highly individual, many caregivers have significant psychological distress after the death of a loved one. This study investigated risk factors that may predict psychological distress, which could aid hospice bereavement departments in targeting bereavement services. METHOD: Demographic characteristics, patient impairment, caregiver baseline symptoms of depression, and caregiver resources were assessed among 188 cancer patient-caregiver dyads. Regression analyses identified predictors of symptoms of depression, grief, and complicated grief one year following loss. RESULTS: Over 50% of bereaved caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptoms one year after death of their relative. Caregivers with fewer years of education and more baseline symptoms of depression had significantly worse grief, complicated grief, and depression. Younger patient age was a significant predictor of poorer outcomes for grief and complicated grief; and less patient impairment was a significant predictor of more post-loss symptoms of depression. Lower social support satisfaction was correlated with worse grief and complicated grief but was not a significant multivariate predictor of poorer outcomes. CONCLUSION: Despite having access to hospice bereavement services, many former caregivers had high psychological distress one year following loss. Bereavement departments could consider utilizing readily available risk factors to target services to former caregivers who may benefit from bereavement services. Bereavement departments might also consider including brief, standardized screenings of caregiver depression in initial risk assessments. Future studies should investigate evidence-based approaches for assessment and interventions among highly distressed former hospice caregivers.

Subject Headings: Aged; *Bereavement; Caregivers/*psychology; Depression/*etiology/psychology; Female; Hospice Care/*psychology; Humans; Male; Neoplasms/therapy; Professional-Family Relations; Regression Analysis; Social Support; Stress, Psychological/*etiology/psychology

Title: Bereavement among hospice caregivers of cancer patients one year following loss: predictors of grief, complicated grief, and symptoms of depression

Subject headings:

Publication year: 2013

Journal or book title: Journal of Palliative Medicine

Volume: 16

Issue: 7

Pages: 745-751

Find the full text : https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/jpm.2012.0450?casa_token=3AvEoUKkkxkAAAAA:widxTK1tm62uMXSBjD60eE8zGMZqFIhE3GxZawPK_Q1yavp-Qzk3tHsLGAtpw_cwctsJdi4ImeY7mK8

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 2295

ISSN: 1557-7740

ISBN:
Details

Author: Allen, S.E.; Carlisle, A.; White, E.J.; Evans, C.C.

Description:

Title: The Plant Nutrient Content of Rainwater

Subject headings: Rain, Plant nutrition, Sodium, Calcium, Nutrient cycle, Phosphorus, Nutrients, Nitrogen, Precipitation, Standard error

Publication year: 1968

Journal or book title: The Journal of Ecology

Volume: 56

Issue: 2

Pages: 497

Find the full text : http://www.jstor.org/stable/2258247

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1850

ISSN: 0022-0477

ISBN:
Details

Author: Allen, S.L.; Lundberg, A.S.

Description: INTRODUCTION: Amonafide is a novel topoisomerase II (Topo II) inhibitor and DNA intercalator that induces apoptotic signaling by blocking the binding of Topo II to DNA. Amonafide retains cytotoxic activity even in the presence of P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR), a major contributor to clinical treatment failure. AREAS COVERED: In vitro, Pgp-mediated transport (efflux) of amonafide from myeloblasts obtained from patients with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) was significantly less than efflux of daunorubicin. Amonafide has shown efficacy in patients with sAML, as well as in patients with poor prognostic characteristics such as older age and unfavorable cytogenetics, all associated with MDR. Improved antileukemic activity is observed when amonafide is given together with cytarabine, rather than as monotherapy, with a complete remission rate of approximately 40% in a recent Phase II trial in sAML. The efficacy of amonafide was maintained among poor-risk subsets of patients, including older patients and patients who had previous myelodysplastic syndrome or previous leukemogenic therapy. The safety profile was acceptable and manageable. EXPERT OPINION: Amonafide plus cytarabine may have clinical utility in patients with sAML and in other poor-risk subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ongoing trials will help define the role for amonafide in the treatment of poor-risk AML.

Title: Amonafide: a potential role in treating acute myeloid leukemia

Subject headings: Animals; Antineoplastic Agents--pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use; Clinical Trials as Topic--methods; DNA Topoisomerases, Type II--metabolism; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Enzyme Inhibitors--pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use; Humans; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute--drug therapy, enzymology, mortality; Naphthalimides--pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use; Survival Rate--trends; Treatment Outcome

Publication year: 2011

Journal or book title: Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs

Volume: 20

Issue: 7

Pages: 995-1003

Find the full text : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21591994

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 199

ISSN: 1354-3784

ISBN:
Details

Author: Almy, B.; Kuskowski, M.; Malone, S.M.; Myers, E.; Luciana, M.

Description: Many researchers have used the standard Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to assess decision-making in adolescence given increased risk-taking during this developmental period. Most studies are cross-sectional and do not observe behavioral trajectories over time, limiting interpretation. This longitudinal study investigated healthy adolescents' and young adults' IGT performance across a 10-year span. A total of 189 individuals (aged 9-23 at baseline) completed a baseline session and were followed at 2-year intervals yielding 5 time-points. IGT deck contingencies were shuffled over time to reduce practice effects. IGT performance (good minus bad decisions) was measured at each assessment point and separated into 3 metrics: overall performance (all blocks), decision-making under ambiguity (blocks 1 and 2), and decision-making under risk (blocks 3, 4, and 5). Covariates included estimated intelligence and affective dispositions as measured by the Behavioral Inhibition and Activation System (BIS/BAS) Scales. A linear effect of age yielded the best fit when comparing linear and quadratic effects of age on overall IGT performance. Age and intelligence positively predicted overall performance, whereas affective approach tendencies (BAS) negatively predicted overall performance. Practice effects were observed and controlled for. Models of ambiguity and risk metrics yielded different patterns of significant predictors. Age predicted better performance and affective approach tendencies predicted worse performance for both metrics. Intelligence was a significant predictor for risk, but not ambiguity. This longitudinal study extends prior work by showing age-related improvements in reward-based decision-making and associating those improvements with cognitive and affective variables. Implications of the results for adolescent development are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

Subject Headings: Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior/*psychology; Age Factors; Child; *Decision Making; Female; Follow-Up Studies; *Gambling; Humans; Intelligence; Linear Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Models, Psychological; Prospective Studies; Psychological Tests; Psychology, Adolescent; Reward; Young Adult

Keywords: A longitudinal analysis of adolescent decision-making with the Iowa Gambling Task

Title: A longitudinal analysis of adolescent decision-making with the Iowa Gambling Task

Subject headings:

Publication year: 2018

Journal or book title: Developmental Psychology

Volume: 54

Issue: 4

Pages: 689-702

Find the full text : https://europepmc.org/articles/pmc5886802

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 2499

ISSN: 0012-1649

ISBN:
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Author: Alonso, A.; Almendral, M.J.; Curto, Y.; Criado, J.J.; Rodriguez, E.; Manzano, J.L.

Description: Flow injection analysis was used to study the reactions occurring between DNA and certain compounds that bind to its double helix, deforming this and even breaking it, such that some of them (e.g., cisplatin) are endowed with antitumoral activity. Use of this technique in the merging zones and stopped-flow modes afforded data on the binding parameters and the kinetic characteristics of the process. The first compound studied was ethidium bromide (EtdBr), used as a fluorescent marker because its fluorescence is enhanced when it binds to DNA. The DNA-EtdBr binding parameters, the apparent intrinsic binding constant (0.31+/-0.02 microM(-1)), and the maximum number of binding sites per nucleotide (0.327+/-0.009) were determined. The modification introduced in these parameters by the presence of proflavine (Prf), a classic competitive inhibitor of the binding of EtdBr to the DNA double helix, was also studied, determining the value of the intrinsic binding constant of Prf (K(Prf) = 0.119+/-9x10(-3) microM(-1)). Finally, we determined the binding parameters between DNA and EtdBr in the presence of the antitumor agent cisplatin, a noncompetitive inhibitor of such binding. This provided information about the binding mechanism as well as the duration and activity of the binding of the compound in its pharmacological use.

Title: Determination of the DNA-binding characteristics of ethidium bromide, proflavine, and cisplatin by flow injection analysis: usefulness in studies on antitumor drugs

Subject headings: Antineoplastic Agents--chemistry, metabolism; Binding Sites; Cisplatin--chemistry, metabolism; DNA--chemistry, metabolism; Ethidium--chemistry, metabolism; Flow Injection Analysis--methods; Fluorescent Dyes; Kinetics; Nucleic Acid Conformation; Proflavine--chemistry, metabolism; Spectrometry, Fluorescence

Publication year: 2006

Journal or book title: Analytical Biochemistry

Volume: 355

Issue: 2

Pages: 157-164

Find the full text : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003269706004118

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 363

ISSN: 0003-2697

ISBN:
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Author: Altman, S.E.; Shankman, S.A.

Description: Because eating disorders (EDs) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) co-occur at high rates and can have functionally similar clinical presentations, it has been suggested that both constructs might be part of a common spectrum of disorders. Identifying the relationship between EDs and OCD may lead to the discovery of important shared core disease processes and/or mechanisms for maintenance. The objective of this paper is to understand the relationship between EDs and OCD by systematically reviewing epidemiological, longitudinal and family studies guided by five models of comorbidity posited by Klein and Riso (1993) and others. Though this literature is relatively small, the preponderance of evidence from these studies largely suggests that OCD/ED co-occur because of a shared etiological relationship. Limitations to extant literature, and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Title: What is the association between obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders?

Subject headings: Anorexia Nervosa/diagnosis/epidemiology/genetics/psychology; Bulimia Nervosa/diagnosis/epidemiology/genetics/psychology; Causality; Comorbidity; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diseases in Twins/genetics/psychology; Feeding and Eating Disorders/diagnosis/epidemiology/genetics/*psychology; Genotype; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis/epidemiology/genetics/*psychology; Personality Disorders/diagnosis/epidemiology/genetics/psychology

Publication year: 2009

Journal or book title: Clinical Psychology Review

Volume: 29

Issue: 7

Pages: 638-646

Find the full text : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735809001081

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1824

ISSN: 0272-7358

ISBN:
Details

Author: Alvarez, J.; Fadic, R.

Description: In toads Xenopus laevis living at 11 degrees (winter), the microtubular density of 4-microns myelinated axons of lumbosacral nerves was assessed with the electron microscope. In controls, the density was 11.2 microtubules/microns2. In nerves incubated at 0 degrees, microtubules decreased following a simple exponential curve with a half time of 4.7 min (k = 0.149 min-1); residual microtubules were 4.5%. After rewarming, the full complement of microtubules reappeared within 60 min. In steady state, the microtubular density exhibited a linear relationship with temperature (range: 0-22 degrees; slope 0.94 microtubules/microns 2 per degree; r, 0.96). After heating the nerve by 11 degrees above the physiological temperature, microtubules increased by 83%, whereby the pool of unpolymerized tubulin was at least 2.7 mg/ml of axoplasm. A seasonal variation of the microtubular density was observed which accorded with the environmental temperature. The macroscopic kinetics of microtubule disassembly in the axoplasm is similar to that reported for purified tubulin but that of assembly is slower. Microtubules of peripheral axons of Xenopus are cold-labile and vary during the annual cycle.

Title: Assembly and disassembly of axonal microtubules of the toad Xenopus laevis under the effect of temperature

Subject headings: Animals; Axons/*physiology; Cytoplasm/metabolism; Kinetics; Microtubules/*physiology; Seasons; *Temperature; Tubulin/metabolism; Xenopus laevis

Publication year: 1992

Journal or book title: The Journal of Experimental Zoology

Volume: 264

Issue: 3

Pages: 261-266

Find the full text : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jez.1402640305/abstract

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1174

ISSN: 0022-104X

ISBN:
Details

Author: Amaku, M.; Coutinho, F.A.B.; Massad, E.

Description: Urban yellow fever and dengue coexist in Africa but not in Asia and South America. In this paper, we examine four hypotheses (and various combinations thereof) to explain the absence of yellow fever in urban areas of Asia and South America. In addition, we examine an additional hypothesis that offers an explanation of the coexistence of the infections in Africa while at the same time explaining their lack of coexistence in Asia. The hypotheses we tested to explain the nonexistence of yellow fever in Asia are the following: (1) the Asian Aedes aegypti is relatively incompetent to transmit yellow fever; (2) there would exist a competition between dengue and yellow fever viruses within the mosquitoes, as suggested by in vitro studies in which the dengue virus always wins; (3) when an A. aegypti mosquito that is infected by or latent for yellow fever acquires dengue, it becomes latent for dengue due to internal competition within the mosquito between the two viruses; (4) there is an important cross-immunity between yellow fever and other flaviviruses, dengue in particular, such that a person recovered from a bout of dengue exhibits a diminished susceptibility to yellow fever. This latter hypothesis is referred to below as the "Asian hypothesis." Finally, we hypothesize that: (5) the coexistence of the infections in Africa is due to the low prevalence of the mosquito Aedes albopictus in Africa, as it competes with A. aegypti. We will refer to this latter hypothesis as the "African hypothesis." We construct a model of transmission that allows all of the above hypotheses to be tested. We conclude that the Asian and the African hypotheses can explain the observed phenomena, whereas other hypotheses fail to do so.

Title: Why dengue and yellow fever coexist in some areas of the world and not in others?

Subject headings: Adaptive Immunity/*immunology; Aedes/*virology; Africa/epidemiology; Animals; Asia/epidemiology; Computer Simulation; *Demography; Dengue/*epidemiology/immunology/transmission; Humans; Insect Vectors/*virology; *Models, Biological; South America/epidemiology; Species Specificity; Yellow Fever/*epidemiology/immunology/transmission

Publication year: 2011

Journal or book title: Bio Systems

Volume: 106

Issue: 2-3

Pages: 111-120

Find the full text : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0303264711001353

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Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1532

ISSN: 0303-2647

ISBN:





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