database help     Search

Description
Title
2923 items found  (Total items:2923)
items per page
Page 6 of 293
  sort by:
Details

Author: Amato, P.R.

Description: The present study updates the P. R. Amato and B. Keith (1991) meta-analysis of children and divorce with a new analysis of 67 studies published in the 1990s. Compared with children with continuously married parents, children with divorced parents continued to score significantly lower on measures of academic achievement, conduct, psychological adjustment, self-concept, and social relations. After controlling for study characteristics, curvilinear trends with respect to decade of publication were present for academic achievement, psychological well-being, self-concept, and social relations. For these outcomes, the gap between children with divorced and married parents decreased during the 1980s and increased again during the 1990s.

Title: Children of divorce in the 1990s: an update of the Amato and Keith (1991) meta-analysis

Subject headings: Adolescent; Adult; Age Factors; Child; Child Psychology; Child, Preschool; Divorce--psychology; Educational Status; Female; Humans; Male; Marriage--psychology; Mental Health; Research Design; Self Concept; Sex Factors; Social Adjustment; United States--epidemiology

Publication year: 2001

Journal or book title: Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43)

Volume: 15

Issue: 3

Pages: 355-370

Find the full text : http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2001-11319-001

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=5148695267791447791&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 276

ISSN: 0893-3200

ISBN:
Details

Author: Amato, P.R.; Keith, B.

Description: This meta-analysis involved 92 studies that compared children living in divorced single-parent families with children living in continuously intact families on measures of well-being. Children of divorce scored lower than children in intact families across a variety of outcomes, with the median effect size being .14 of a standard deviation. For some outcomes, methodologically sophisticated studies yielded weaker effect sizes than did other studies. In addition, for some outcomes, more recent studies yielded weaker effect sizes than did studies carried out during earlier decades. Some support was found for theoretical perspectives emphasizing parental absence and economic disadvantage, but the most consistent support was found for a family conflict perspective.

Title: Parental divorce and the well-being of children: a meta-analysis

Subject headings: Adaptation, Psychological; Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Divorce--psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Parent-Child Relations; Personality Development

Publication year: 1991

Journal or book title: Psychological Bulletin

Volume: 110

Issue: 1

Pages: 26-46

Find the full text : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1832495

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=5148695267791447791&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 277

ISSN: 0033-2909

ISBN:
Details

Author: Ambrosone, A.; Costa, A.; Leone, A.; Grillo, S.

Description: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) govern many aspects of RNA metabolism, including pre-mRNA processing, transport, stability/decay and translation. Although relatively few plant RNA-binding proteins have been characterized genetically and biochemically, more than 200 RBP genes have been predicted in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, suggesting that they might serve specific plant functions. Besides their role in normal cellular functions, RBPs are emerging also as an interesting class of proteins involved in a wide range of post-transcriptional regulatory events that are important in providing plants with the ability to respond rapidly to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we review the most recent results and evidence on the functional role of RBPs in plant adaptation to various unfavourable environmental conditions and their contribution to enhance plant tolerance to abiotic stresses, with special emphasis on osmotic and temperature stress.

Title: Beyond transcription: RNA-binding proteins as emerging regulators of plant response to environmental constraints

Subject headings: Abscisic Acid/metabolism; Acclimatization/*physiology; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; Osmotic Pressure/physiology; *Plant Physiological Processes; Plants/genetics; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism/*physiology; Transcription, Genetic

Publication year: 2012

Journal or book title: Plant Science : an International Journal of Experimental Plant Biology

Volume: 182

Issue:

Pages: 12-18

Find the full text : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168945211000471

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=437230087177569341&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1226

ISSN: 0168-9452

ISBN:
Details

Author: Amici, M.; Eusebi, F.; Miledi, R.

Description: Medical treatment with the aminoglycosidic antibiotic gentamicin may produce side effects that include neuromuscular blockage and ototoxicity; which are believed to result from a dysfunction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). Gentamicin is known to reversibly block ACh-currents generated by the activation of muscle-type alphabetagammadelta-AChR and neuronal alpha9-AChR. We studied the effects of gentamicin on heteromeric alphabetagammadelta-AChR and homomeric alpha7-AChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Prolonged treatment with gentamicin, and other antibiotics, differentially altered alphabetagammadelta- and alpha7-AChR responses. Specifically, gentamicin accelerated desensitization and did not reduce ACh-currents in oocytes expressing alphabetagammadelta-AChRs, whereas ACh-currents were reduced and desensitization was unaltered in oocytes expressing alpha7-AChRs. Moreover, acutely applied gentamicin acted as a competitive antagonist on both types of receptors and increased the rate of desensitization in alphabetagammadelta-AChR while reducing the rate of desensitization in alpha7-AChR. This data helps to better understand the action of gentamicin on muscle and nervous tissues, providing mechanistic insights that could eventually lead to improving the medical use of aminoglycosides.

Title: Effects of the antibiotic gentamicin on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

Subject headings: Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents--pharmacology; Cochlea--drug effects; DNA, Complementary--biosynthesis; Electrophysiology; Gentamicins--pharmacology; Humans; Membrane Potentials--drug effects, physiology; Mice; Nicotinic Antagonists; Oocytes--metabolism; Patch-Clamp Techniques; RNA, Complementary--biosynthesis; Receptors, Nicotinic--biosynthesis, drug effects, genetics; Torpedo; Vestibule, Labyrinth--drug effects; Xenopus; alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

Publication year: 2005

Journal or book title: Neuropharmacology

Volume: 49

Issue: 5

Pages: 627-637

Find the full text : http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028390805001644

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=15032606533823385460&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 445

ISSN: 0028-3908

ISBN:
Details

Author: Amir, N.; McNally, R.J.; Riemann, B.C.; Burns, J.; Lorenz, M.; Mullen, J.T.

Description: Anxious individuals are slower at color-naming threat-related than nonthreat-related words in the emotional Stroop task. Recently, Mathews and Sebastian (1993, Cognition and Emotion, 7, 527-530) reported that this Stroop interference effect disappears when snake-fearful students are exposed to a snake while performing the color-naming task. In the present experiment, we had patients with social phobia and normal control subjects perform an emotional Stroop task under either low anxiety (i.e. upon entering the laboratory) or high anxiety (i.e. before giving a speech). Results indicated that Stroop interference for socially threatening words in the phobic group was suppressed under high anxiety. These findings may indicate that increased effort enables the subjects to suppress the interference produced in the Stroop task.

Subject Headings: Adult; Anxiety/diagnosis/*psychology; Arousal; *Attention; *Color Perception; Defense Mechanisms; *Discrimination Learning; Emotions; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Phobic Disorders/diagnosis/*psychology; Reaction Time; *Reading; *Semantics; Students/psychology

Keywords: Suppression of the emotional Stroop effect by increased anxiety in patients with social phobia

Title: Suppression of the emotional Stroop effect by increased anxiety in patients with social phobia

Subject headings:

Publication year: 1996

Journal or book title: Behaviour Research and Therapy

Volume: 34

Issue: 11-12

Pages: 945-948

Find the full text : https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000579679600054X

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=2372059571427874615&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 2820

ISSN: 0005-7967

ISBN:
Details

Author: Amorim, K.N.S.; Chagas, D.C.G.; Sulczewski, F.B.; Boscardin, S.B.

Description: Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, efficiently presenting antigens to T cells. This ability relies on the presence of numerous surface and intracellular receptors capable of sensing microbial components as well as inflammation and on a very efficient machinery for antigen presentation. In this way, DCs sense the presence of a myriad of pathogens, including Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of malaria. Despite many efforts to control this infection, malaria is still responsible for high rates of morbidity and mortality. Different groups have shown that DCs act during Plasmodium infection, and data suggest that the phenotypically distinct DCs subsets are key factors in the regulation of immunity during infection. In this review, we will discuss the importance of DCs for the induction of immunity against the different stages of Plasmodium, the outcomes of DCs activation, and also what is currently known about Plasmodium components that trigger such activation.

Title: Dendritic Cells and Their Multiple Roles during Malaria Infection

Subject headings: Antigen Presentation; Dendritic Cells/*immunology; Humans; Immunologic Tests; Life Cycle Stages; Malaria/*immunology/parasitology; Plasmodium/growth & development/immunology; T-Lymphocytes/immunology

Publication year: 2016

Journal or book title: Journal of Immunology Research

Volume: 2016

Issue:

Pages: 2926436

Find the full text : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4823477/

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=8822898220188093108&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1687

ISSN: 2314-7156

ISBN:
Details

Author: Amsden, A.H.

Description: Like Narcissus, the World Bank sees its own reflection in East Asia's success. It attributes the East Asian miracle to macroeconomic basics–high saving and investment rates, expenditures on education, and exports–but in reality, these are anchored in micro-institutions that exhibit pervasive state intervention. East Asia created competitiveness by subsidizing learning, whereas Bank policy emphasizes methods that effectively cut real wages. The Report is rich in empirical data, but they do not support the Bank's dismissal of industrial policy as “ineffective,” and they are presented in a way that makes it difficult for students to corroborate Bank findings. The greatest disappointment of the Report's market fundamentalism is a failure to study seriously how elements of the East Asian model can be adapted to suit conditions in other countries.

Title: Why isn't the whole world experimenting with the East Asian model to develop?: Review of the East Asian miracle

Subject headings: World Bank; Micro-institutions; State intervention; East Asia

Publication year: 1994

Journal or book title: World Development

Volume: 22

Issue: 4

Pages: 627-633

Find the full text : http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0305750X94901171

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=13362678225346444345&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 651

ISSN: 0305750X

ISBN:
Details

Author: Anastasi, E.M.; Wohlsen, T.D.; Stratton, H.M.; Katouli, M.

Description: We investigated the survival of Escherichia coli in two STPs utilising UV irradiation (STP-A) or chlorination (STP-B) for disinfection. In all, 370 E. coli strains isolated from raw influent sewage (IS), secondary treated effluent (STE) and effluent after the disinfection processes of both STPs were typed using a high resolution biochemical fingerprinting method and were grouped into common (C-) and single (S-) biochemical phenotypes (BPTs). In STP-A, 83 BPTs comprising 123 isolates were found in IS and STE, of which 7 BPTs survived UV irradiation. Isolates tested from the same sites of STP-B (n = 220) comprised 122 BPTs, however, only two BPTs were found post-chlorination. A representative isolate from each BPT from both STPs was tested for the presence of 11 virulence genes (VGs) associated with uropathogenic (UPEC) or intestinal pathogenic (IPEC) E. coli strains. Strains surviving UV irradiation were distributed among seven phylogenetic groups with five BPTs carrying VGs associated with either UPEC (4 BPTs) or IPEC (1 BPT). In contrast, E. coli strains found in STP-B carried no VGs. Strains from both STPs were resistant to up to 12 out of the 21 antibiotics tested but there was no significant difference between the numbers of antibiotics to which surviving strains were resistant to in these STPs. Our data suggests that some E. coli strains have a better ability to survive STPs utilising chlorination and UV irradiation for disinfection. However, strains that survive UV irradiation are more diverse and may carry more VGs than those surviving SPTs using chlorination.

Subject Headings: Biodegradation, Environmental/radiation effects; *Disinfection; Drug Resistance, Microbial/radiation effects; Escherichia coli/genetics/pathogenicity/physiology/*radiation effects; *Halogenation/radiation effects; Microbial Viability/*radiation effects; Sewage/*microbiology; *Ultraviolet Rays; Virulence/genetics/radiation effects; *Water Purification; Chlorination; Disinfection; Escherichia coli; Sewage treatment plant; UV irradiation

Keywords: Survival of Escherichia coli in two sewage treatment plants using UV irradiation and chlorination for disinfection

Title: Survival of Escherichia coli in two sewage treatment plants using UV irradiation and chlorination for disinfection

Subject headings:

Publication year: 2013

Journal or book title: Water Research

Volume: 47

Issue: 17

Pages: 6670-6679

Find the full text : https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135413006878

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=3756650837304631854&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 2815

ISSN: 0043-1354

ISBN:
Details

Author: Andersen, S.B.; Karstoft, K.-I.; Bertelsen, M.; Madsen, T.

Description: OBJECTIVE: To identify trajectories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms from before to 2.5 years after deployment and to assess risk factors for symptom fluctuations and late-onset PTSD. METHOD: 743 soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 were assessed for PTSD symptoms using the PTSD Checklist (PCL) at 6 occasions from predeployment to 2.5 years postdeployment (study sample = 561). Predeployment vulnerabilities and deployment and postdeployment stressors were also assessed. RESULTS: Six trajectories were identified: a resilient trajectory with low symptom levels across all assessments (78.1%) and 5 trajectories showing symptom fluctuations. These included a trajectory of late onset (5.7%), independently predicted by earlier emotional problems (OR = 5.59; 95% CI, 1.57-19.89) and predeployment and postdeployment traumas (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.17 and OR = 1.13; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26). Two trajectories of symptom fluctuations in the low-to-moderate range (7.5% and 4.1%); a trajectory of symptom relief during deployment, but with a drastic increase at the final assessments (2.0%); and a trajectory with mild symptom increase during deployment followed by relief at return (2.7%) were also found. Symptom fluctuation was predicted independently by predeployment risk factors (depression [OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.16-1.39], neuroticism [OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.21], and earlier traumas [OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.16]) and deployment-related stressors (danger/injury exposure [OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.04-1.40]), but not by postdeployment stressors. DISCUSSION: The results confirm earlier findings of stress response heterogeneity following military deployment and highlight the impact of predeployment, perideployment, and postdeployment risk factors in predicting PTSD symptomatology and late-onset PTSD symptoms.

Title: Latent trajectories of trauma symptoms and resilience: the 3-year longitudinal prospective USPER study of Danish veterans deployed in Afghanistan

Subject headings: Adult; Afghan Campaign 2001-; Denmark/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Male; Military Personnel/psychology/statistics & numerical data; Prospective Studies; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; *Resilience, Psychological; Risk Factors; Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology/*etiology/psychology; Time Factors; Veterans/*psychology/statistics & numerical data; Young Adult

Publication year: 2014

Journal or book title: The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

Volume: 75

Issue: 9

Pages: 1001-1008

Find the full text : http://www.psychiatrist.com/jcp/article/Pages/2014/v75n09/v75n0920.aspx

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=13577523286600362765&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 1304

ISSN: 0160-6689

ISBN:
Details

Author: Anderson, J.A.

Description: A model of a neural system where a group of neurons projects to another group of neurons is discussed. We assume that a trace is the simultaneous pattern of individual activities shown by a group of neurons. We assume synaptic interactions add linearly and that synaptic weights (quantitative measure of degree of coupling between two cells) can be coded in a simple but optimal way where changes in synaptic weight are proportional to the product of pre-and postsynaptic activity at a given time. Then it is shown that this simple system is capable of "memory" in the sense that it can (1) recognize a previously presented trace and (2) if two traces have been associated in the past (that is, if trace 1 was impressed on the first group of neurons and trace 2 was impressed on the second group of neurons and synaptic weights coupling the two groups changed according to the above rule) presentation of 1 to the first group of neurons gives rise to 2; plus a calculable amount of noise at the second set of neurons. This kind of memory is called an "interactive memory" since distinct stored traces interact in storage. It is shown that this model can effectively perform many functions. Quantitative expressions are derived for the average signal to noise ratio for recognition and one type of association. The selectivity of the system is discussed. References to physiological data are made where appropriate. A sketch of a model of mammalian cerebral cortex which generates an interactive memory is presented and briefly discussed. We identify a trace with the activity of groups of cortical pyramidal cells. Then it is argued that certain plausible assumptions about the properties of the synapses coupling groups of pyramidal cells lead to the generation of an interactive memory.

Title: A simple neural network generating an interactive memory

Subject headings: Neural network; Neurons; Synapses; Pyramidal cells; Interactive memory

Publication year: 1972

Journal or book title: Mathematical Biosciences

Volume: 14

Issue: 3-4

Pages: 197-220

Find the full text : http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0025556472900752

Find more like this one (cited by): https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=16016050827885146868&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Type: Journal Article

Serial number: 602

ISSN: 0025-5564

ISBN:





Powered by: DaDaBIK database front-end       

Done!