Database     Search

Description
2337 items found  (Total items:2337)
items per page
Page 9 of 234
  sort by:
Details

Author: Attiwill, P.M.

Title: The chemical composition of rainwater in relation to cycling of nutrients in mature eucalyptus forest

Description: The alteration of the ionic composition of rainwater by vegetation has been attributed in the literature both to foliar leaching (representing circulation of elements within an ecosystem) and to the washing from leaves of particulate matter (an addition of elements to the ecosystem). The purpose of this study was to estimate the magnitudes of these components in a matureEucalyptus obliqua forest on the Great Dividing Range, Australia.

Rainwater samples collected both within the forest and from an opening devoid of trees at regular intervals during a two year period were analyzed for sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus. The ionic composition of rainwater sampled at the open area fits an expected geographical distribution pattern, and the origin of the ions is considered to be mainly oceanic and partly terrestrial. The concentration of ions in rainwater collected both at the open area and from within the forest is related, inversely and exponentially, to the intensity of rainfall during a collection period.

Ionic concentrations in rainwater collected beneath the forest canopy were greater than concentrations in rainwater collected at the open area. Considerations of ionic ratios lead to the conclusion that this increase is principally the result of foliar leaching. Furthermore the data for this mature forest conform closely to the results, reported in the literature of leaching experiments carried out under controlled conditions with small, individual plants.

Subject headings:

Year: 1966

Publication: Plant and Soil

Volume: 24

Issue: 3

Pages: 390-406

Full text: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01374047?LI=true

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=12028051989470193701&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0032-079X

ISBN:
Details

Author: Au, T.K.

Title: Chinese and English counterfactuals: the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis revisited

Description: Bloom (1981) found that Chinese speakers were less likely than English speakers to give counterfactual interpretations to a counterfactual story. These findings, together with the presence of a distinct counterfactual marker (the subjunctive) in English, but not in Chinese, were interpreted as evidence for the weak form of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. A series of five studies was designed to replicate these findings, using both Chinese and English versions of a new counterfactual story as well as the story used by Bloom. In these studies, bilingual Chinese showed little difficulty in understanding either story in either language, insofar as the English and Chinese were idiomatic. For one story, the Chinese bilinguals performed better in Chinese than American subjects did in English. Nearly monolingual Chinese who did not know the English subjunctive also gave mostly counterfactual responses. These findings suggest that the mastery of the English subjunctive is probably quite tangenital to counterfactual reasoning in Chinese. In short, the present research yielded no support for the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.

Subject headings: Adolescent; Adult; Child; *Cognition; Female; Humans; *Language; Linguistics; Male; Thinking

Year: 1983

Publication: Cognition

Volume: 15

Issue: 1-3

Pages: 155-187

Full text: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0010027783900380

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=776056521044379214&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0010-0277

ISBN:
Details

Author: Aubourg, S.P.; Torres-Arreola, W.; Trigo, M.; Ezquerra-Brauer, J.M.

Title: Partial characterization of jumbo squid skin pigment extract and its antioxidant potential in a marine oil system: Jumbo squid skin pigment extract and antioxidant activity

Description: Pigment compounds were extracted from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) skin with an acid-ethanol solvent (JSE). Freeze-dried JSE was characterized with respect to solubility in different solvents, absorption UV–VIS, and FT-IR spectra, and tested for its radical scavenging activity against ABTS and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). The potential ability of JSE for inhibiting oxidation of cod liver oil (CLO) was also determined by monitoring dienes, trienes, peroxide value (PV), thiobarbutiric acid (TBA), and polyene index (PI) in samples stored at 15, 25, and 50°C for 12 days. Concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2% JSE were added to CLO. The yield of JSE was 8.8 mg/g freeze-dried skin. Solubility behavior, UV–Vis, and FT-IR spectra of JSE suggests that this pigment extract might belong to the ommochrome family. Moreover, a characteristic xanthommatin peak (1740 cm−1) was observed. JSE exhibited scavenging activity on ABTS•+ radical and in the ORAC assay. After storage PV and TBA increased, whereas PI decreased mainly in the control treatment. The addition of JSE delayed lipid oxidation in CLO during the first 8 days of storage at 50°C. JSE was identified as promising source of antioxidants to retard fish lipid oxidation.

Subject headings: Antioxidant activity;By-product;Oxidized marine oil;Pigment extract;Spectroscopic analysis;Squid skin;Trolox

Year: 2016

Publication: European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology

Volume:

Issue:

Pages: n/a-n/a

Full text: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Josafat_Brauer/publication/289586185_Partial_characterization_of_jumbo_squid_skin_pigment_extract_and_its_antioxidant_potential_in_a_marine_oil_system/links/57069b8f08aefb22b0934344.pdf

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=4060201557175264398&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 1438-7697

ISBN:
Details

Author: Aubrey, B.J.; Kelly, G.L.; Janic, A.; Herold, M.J.; Strasser, A.

Title: How does p53 induce apoptosis and how does this relate to p53-mediated tumour suppression?

Description: The tumour suppressor gene TP53 is mutated in ~50% of human cancers. In addition to its function in tumour suppression, p53 also plays a major role in the response of malignant as well as nontransformed cells to many anticancer therapeutics, particularly those that cause DNA damage. P53 forms a homotetrameric transcription factor that is reported to directly regulate ~500 target genes, thereby controlling a broad range of cellular processes, including cell cycle arrest, cell senescence, DNA repair, metabolic adaptation and cell death. For a long time, induction of apoptotic death in nascent neoplastic cells was regarded as the principal mechanism by which p53 prevents tumour development. This concept has, however, recently been challenged by the findings that in striking contrast to Trp53-deficient mice, gene-targeted mice that lack the critical effectors of p53-induced apoptosis do not develop tumours spontaneously. Remarkably, even mice lacking all mediators critical for p53-induced apoptosis, G1/S boundary cell cycle arrest and cell senescence do not develop any tumours spontaneously. In this review we discuss current understanding of the mechanisms by which p53 induces cell death and how this affects p53-mediated tumour suppression and the response of malignant cells to anticancer therapy.

Subject Headings: Animals; *Apoptosis; Humans; Mice; Mutation; Neoplasms/*genetics; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/metabolism; Signal Transduction; Transcription Factors/metabolism; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics/*metabolism/physiology

Subject headings:

Year: 2018

Publication: Cell Death and Differentiation

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 104-113

Full text: https://www.nature.com/articles/cdd2017169

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=6010551675349291396&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 1350-9047

ISBN:
Details

Author: Avery, D.H.; Wildschiodtz, G.; Smallwood, R.G.; Martin, D.; Rafaelsen, O.J.

Title: REM latency and core temperature relationships in primary depression

Description: REM latency and rectal and ear canal temperature were studied simultaneously in 11 controls and nine depressed patients; seven of the patients were studied when recovered. REM latency was shorter in the depressed group compared with controls and lengthened with recovery. The nocturnal and ear canal temperatures were higher in the depressed group compared with controls and decreased with recovery. REM latency and the nocturnal rectal temperature were negatively correlated when all the nights of the depressed patients were analyzed (r = -0.44) and when all the nights of the subjects were analyzed (r = -0.44). REM latency and nocturnal ear canal temperatures were negatively correlated when all the nights of the control group were analyzed (r = -0.34). The timing of the temperature rhythm did not appear to be correlated with the REM latency.

Subject headings: Adult; Aged; Aging/physiology; Bipolar Disorder/*physiopathology; *Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm; Depressive Disorder/*physiopathology; Female; Humans; Male; Menopause; Middle Aged; Reaction Time/physiology; Sleep, REM/*physiology

Year: 1986

Publication: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

Volume: 74

Issue: 3

Pages: 269-280

Full text: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0447.1986.tb06244.x/abstract

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=12591910601577925581&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0001-690X

ISBN:
Details

Author: Aveskamp, M.M.; Verkley, G.J.M.; de Gruyter, J.; Murace, M.A.; Perello, A.; Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

Title: DNA phylogeny reveals polyphyly of Phoma section Peyronellaea and multiple taxonomic novelties

Description: Species of the anamorph genus Phoma are commonly isolated from a wide range of ecological niches. They are notoriously difficult to identify due to the paucity of morphological features and the plasticity of these when cultivated on agar media. Species linked to Phoma section Peyronellaea are typified by the production of dictyochlamydospores and thus have additional characters to use in taxon delineation. However, the taxonomy of this section is still not fully understood. Furthermore the production of such chlamydospores also is known in some other sections of Phoma. DNA sequences were generated from three loci, namely ITS, actin, and 3-tubulin, to clarify the phylogeny of Phoma taxa that produce dictyochlamydospores. Results were unable to support section Peyronellaea as a taxonomic entity. Dictyochlamydospore formation appears to be a feature that developed, or was lost, many times during the evolution of Phoma. Furthermore, based on the multigene analyses, five new Phoma species could be delineated while a further five required taxonomic revision to be consistent with the genetic variation observed.

Subject headings: Actins/analysis/genetics; Ascomycota/*classification/cytology/genetics; Biodiversity; DNA, Fungal/*analysis/genetics; DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/analysis/genetics; Genetic Speciation; Genetic Variation; Molecular Sequence Data; *Phylogeny; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Sequence Alignment; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Species Specificity; Tubulin/analysis/genetics

Year: 2009

Publication: Mycologia

Volume: 101

Issue: 3

Pages: 363-382

Full text: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3852/08-199

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=2469324929438478639&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0027-5514

ISBN:
Details

Author: Ayer, W.A.; Lee, S.P.; Tsuneda, A.; Hiratsuka, Y.

Title: The isolation, identification, and bioassay of the antifungal metabolites produced by_Monocillium nordinii_

Description: The metabolites produced when Monocillium nordinii (Bourchier) W. Gams, a destructive mycoparasite of pine stem rusts, is grown in liquid culture have been separated and identified. The metabolites include the known compound monorden (1) and five new substances, monocillin I (2), monocillin II (4), monocillin III (3), monocillin IV (5), and monocillin V (6). Structural assignments and chemical correlations of the five new compounds are reported and the absolute configuration of monorden is assigned. The antifungal spectra of the three major metabolites are reported. Monorden and monocillin I show pronounced activity against a wide variety of fungi, including Ceratocystis ulmi, the cause of Dutch elm disease. Extraction of the mycelium yielded averufin (13), along with a pigment C18H12O6, as yet unidentified.

Subject headings: Metabolites; Monocillium nordinii; Mycroparasite

Year: 1980

Publication: Canadian Journal of Microbiology

Volume: 26

Issue: 7

Pages: 766-773

Full text: http://www.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/bookstore_pdfs/11098.pdf

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=9543199011196072180&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0008-4166

ISBN:
Details

Author: Azuma, T.

Title: Working memory and perseveration in verbal fluency

Description: Letter and semantic fluency tasks are often used in neuropsychological assessment and are sensitive to many conditions. Performance is assessed by correct responses and errors, including perseverations. Healthy young adults performed letter and semantic fluency tasks. One group performed these tasks in the conventional manner; 2 other groups performed them while maintaining memory loads. The memory loads consisted either of words from the same category as the fluency task or of words from a different category. The results showed little effect of memory loads on correct responses but significant effects of memory load on perseveration rates: Same-category loads resulted in higher rates, especially in letter fluency. The results are discussed in terms of frontal lobe function in verbal fluency.

Subject headings: Analysis of Variance; Humans; Memory, Short-Term/*physiology; Neuropsychological Tests; Random Allocation; Semantics; Task Performance and Analysis; Verbal Behavior/*physiology; Verbal Learning/*physiology; Vocabulary

Year: 2004

Publication: Neuropsychology

Volume: 18

Issue: 1

Pages: 69-77

Full text: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/neu/18/1/69/

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=15424309848437011709&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0894-4105

ISBN:
Details

Author: Baber, M.; Chaudhry, S.; Kelly, L.; Ross, C.; Carleton, B.; Berger, H.; Koren, G.

Title: The pharmacogenetics of codeine pain relief in the postpartum period

Description: The objective of this study was to examine interindividual variability in codeine requirements and pain management by examining select genetic polymorphisms in the codeine pharmacological pathway. The study included a nested cohort of 98 women who were prescribed codeine following cesarean section. Participants were genotyped for select polymorphisms of the COMT, ABCB1, CYP2D6, UGT2B7 and OPRM1 genes and instructed to describe their level of pain using the visual analog scale (mm) 1 h following each dose of codeine. Analysis revealed that reported pain increases with maternal age (P=0.041). Asians required more codeine than Caucasians (P=0.048). Significant differences in mean dose consumption were seen among the genotypic groups of the OPRM1 A118G (P=0.001) and UGT2B7 C802T (P=0.015) variants. These variants were found to predict codeine consumption in the cohort overall (P=0.000) and among Caucasians (P=0.001). These findings will assist in customizing therapy to effectively manage postpartum pain.

Subject headings: Adult; Cesarean Section/adverse effects; Codeine/*administration & dosage; Female; Genotype; Glucuronosyltransferase/*genetics; Humans; Pain/drug therapy/*genetics/pathology; Pain Management; Pharmacogenetics; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Postpartum Period; Pregnancy; Receptors, Opioid, mu/*genetics

Year: 2015

Publication: The Pharmacogenomics Journal

Volume: 15

Issue: 5

Pages: 430-435

Full text: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Shahnaz_Chaudhry/publication/273387893_The_pharmacogenetics_of_codeine_pain_relief_in_the_postpartum_period/links/5548bfea0cf2f72b5d426455.pdf

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=14701955568361062270&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 1470-269X

ISBN:
Details

Author: Bablanian, G.M.; Weiss, K.R.; Kupfermann, I.

Title: Motor control of the appetitive phase of feeding behavior in Aplysia

Description: The appetitive phase of feeding behavior, in the gastropod, Aplysia, consists of head lifting, head waving, orientation of the head to food, and locomotion. We have initiated studies of the neural control of head waving using three methods: (i) anatomical description of the nerves innervating muscles that are involved in head movement, (ii) electrical stimulation of nerves in a semi-intact preparation, and (iii) recording from nerves in free-moving animals. The muscles controlling head movements, located in the dorsal and lateral neck region, are innervated primarily by pleural nerve 1 and pedal nerves 2, 3, and 5. Electrical stimulation of these nerves caused both longitudinal and lateral contractions of the neck muscles, the largest contractions being in the area where the nerve first enters the muscle. Extracellular recordings from pleural nerve 1 and pedal nerves, in free-moving animals, showed an increase in extracellular activity during head lifting, at the onset of appetitive feeding behavior. Directionally specific inhibition and excitation in neural activity occurred in pleural nerve 1 and pedal nerve 5 during leftward and rightward movements of the head (head waving). Cobalt and nickel backfills of pleural nerve 1 and pedal nerve 5 revealed cell bodies in the cerebral, pedal, and pleural ganglia. The neurons are therefore putative motor neurons for the neck muscles involved in appetitive behavior. This evidence suggests that appetitive control of feeding may involve the coordinated activity of several different ganglia.

Subject headings: Animals; Aplysia; Appetitive Behavior/*physiology; Feeding Behavior/*physiology; Ganglia/physiology; Locomotion; Motor Activity/*physiology; Motor Neurons/physiology; Muscle Contraction; Muscles/*innervation; Neck Muscles/innervation; Peripheral Nerves/physiology

Year: 1987

Publication: Behavioral and Neural Biology

Volume: 48

Issue: 3

Pages: 394-407

Full text: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0163104787909575

Cited by: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cites=17329601056080692245&as_sdt=1000005&sciodt=0,16&hl=en

Format: Journal Article

ISSN: 0163-1047

ISBN:





Powered by: DaDaBIK database front-end       

Done!