more information
Search within Results:

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author McPheeters, D.S.; Wise, J.A. file  url
openurl 
  Title Measurement of in vivo RNA synthesis rates Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Methods in Enzymology Abbreviated Journal Methods Enzymol  
  Volume 530 Issue (up) Pages 117-135  
  Keywords Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal; RNA, Fungal/*genetics; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*genetics; Schizosaccharomyces/*genetics; Transcription, Genetic; Immobilized DNA/RNA; Immobilized probes; In vivo RNA synthesis rates; Labeled RNA; Nascent transcripts  
  Abstract A technique is described to directly measure ongoing transcription from individual genes in permeabilized cells of either the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Transcription run-on (TRO) analysis is used to compare the relative rates of synthesis for specific transcripts in cells grown under different environmental conditions or harvested at different stages of development. As the amount of an individual RNA species present at any given time is determined by its net rate of synthesis and degradation, an accurate picture of transcription per se can be obtained only by directly measuring de novo synthesis of RNA (if you are interested in RNA degradation, see Method for measuring mRNA decay rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Most techniques employed to measure changes in the relative levels of individual transcripts present under different conditions, including Northern analysis (see Northern blotting), RT-PCR (see Reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR)), nuclease protection assays (see Explanatory Chapter: Nuclease Protection Assays), and genome-wide assays, such as microarray analysis and high throughput RNA sequencing, measure changes in the steady-state level of a transcript, which may or may not reflect the actual changes in transcription of the gene. Recent studies carried out in fission yeast have demonstrated that increases in the steady-state level (accumulation) of many individual mRNAs occur without any significant changes in transcription rates (McPheeters et al., 2009), highlighting the important role of regulated RNA stability in determining gene expression programs (Harigaya et al., 2006).  
  Call Number Serial 1345  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Parsons, A.B.; Brost, R.L.; Ding, H.; Li, Z.; Zhang, C.; Sheikh, B.; Brown, G.W.; Kane, P.M.; Hughes, T.R.; Boone, C. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Integration of chemical-genetic and genetic interaction data links bioactive compounds to cellular target pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Nature Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Nat Biotechnol  
  Volume 22 Issue (up) 1 Pages 62-69  
  Keywords Biotechnology/*methods; Cluster Analysis; Drug Industry/*methods; *Drug Resistance; Fungal Proteins/metabolism; Gene Deletion; *Gene Expression Regulation; Mutation; Pharmacogenetics; Proton-Translocating ATPases/metabolism; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*genetics; Software  
  Abstract Bioactive compounds can be valuable research tools and drug leads, but it is often difficult to identify their mechanism of action or cellular target. Here we investigate the potential for integration of chemical-genetic and genetic interaction data to reveal information about the pathways and targets of inhibitory compounds. Taking advantage of the existing complete set of yeast haploid deletion mutants, we generated drug-hypersensitivity (chemical-genetic) profiles for 12 compounds. In addition to a set of compound-specific interactions, the chemical-genetic profiles identified a large group of genes required for multidrug resistance. In particular, yeast mutants lacking a functional vacuolar H(+)-ATPase show multidrug sensitivity, a phenomenon that may be conserved in mammalian cells. By filtering chemical-genetic profiles for the multidrug-resistant genes and then clustering the compound-specific profiles with a compendium of large-scale genetic interaction profiles, we were able to identify target pathways or proteins. This method thus provides a powerful means for inferring mechanism of action.  
  Call Number Serial 339  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Heinisch, J.J. file  url
doi  openurl
  Title Baker's yeast as a tool for the development of antifungal kinase inhibitors--targeting protein kinase C and the cell integrity pathway Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Biochimica et Biophysica Acta Abbreviated Journal Biochim Biophys Acta  
  Volume 1754 Issue (up) 1-2 Pages 171-182  
  Keywords Antifungal Agents/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology; Cell Cycle/*drug effects; Cell Wall/drug effects/metabolism; Enzyme Inhibitors/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology; Humans; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects; Models, Biological; Protein Kinase C/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism; Protein Kinases/genetics/metabolism; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/chemistry/enzymology/*metabolism; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism  
  Abstract Today, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is probably the best-studied eukaryotic organism. This review first focuses on the signaling process which is mediated by the unique yeast protein kinase C (Pkc1p) and a downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. This pathway ensures cellular integrity by sensing cell surface stress and controlling cell wall biosynthesis and progression through the cell cycle. The domain structure of Pkc1p is conserved from yeast to humans. A yeast system for heterologous expression of specific domains in a chimeric yeast/mammalian PKC enzyme (“domain shuffling”) is depicted. It is also proposed how this system could be employed for the study of protein kinase inhibitors in high-throughput screens. Moreover, a reporter assay that allows a quantitative readout of the activity of the cell integrity signaling pathway is introduced. Since a variety of protein kinases take part in the signal transduction, this broadens the range of targets for potential inhibitors.  
  Call Number Serial 554  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leskovac, V.; Trivic, S.; Anderson, B.M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Use of competitive dead-end inhibitors to determine the chemical mechanism of action of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 178 Issue (up) 1-2 Pages 219-227  
  Keywords yeast; alcohol; dehydrogenase; dead-end inhibitors; mechanism of action; dehydrogenases  
  Abstract In this work, we have postulated a comprehensive and unified chemical mechanism of action for yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1, constitutive, cytoplasmic), isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The chemical mechanism of yeast enzyme is based on the integrity of the proton relay system: His-51....NAD+....Thr-48....R.CH2OH(H2>O)....Zn<math>++, stretching from His-51 on the surface of enzyme to the active site zinc atom in the substrate-binding site of enzyme. Further, it is based on extensive studies of steady-state kinetic properties of enzyme which were published recently. In this study, we have reported the pH-dependence of dissociation constants for several competitive dead-end inhibitors of yeast enzyme from their binary complexes with enzyme, or their ternary complexes with enzyme and NAD+ or NADH; inhibitors include: pyrazole, acetamide, sodium azide, 2-fluoroethanol, and 2,2,2-trifluorethanol. The unified mechanism describes the structures of four dissociation forms of apoenzyme, two forms of the binary complex E.NAD+, three forms of the ternary complex E.NAD+.alcohol, two forms of the ternary complex E.NADH.aldehyde and three binary complexes E.NADH. Appropriate pKa values have been ascribed to protonation forms of most of the above mentioned complexes of yeast enzyme with coenzymes and substrates.  
  Call Number Serial 1414  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Schmidt, B.H.; Osheroff, N.; Berger, J.M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Structure of a topoisomerase II-DNA-nucleotide complex reveals a new control mechanism for ATPase activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Nature Structural & Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal Nat Struct Mol Biol  
  Volume 19 Issue (up) 11 Pages 1147-1154  
  Keywords Adenylyl Imidodiphosphate/*chemistry/metabolism; Amino Acid Sequence; Antigens, Neoplasm/*chemistry/metabolism; Chromatography, Gel; Crystallization; DNA/*chemistry/metabolism; DNA Topoisomerases, Type II/*chemistry/metabolism; DNA-Binding Proteins/*chemistry/metabolism; Dimerization; *Models, Molecular; Molecular Sequence Data; Multiprotein Complexes/*chemistry/metabolism; *Protein Conformation; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*enzymology  
  Abstract Type IIA topoisomerases control DNA supercoiling and disentangle chromosomes through a complex ATP-dependent strand-passage mechanism. Although a general framework exists for type IIA topoisomerase function, the architecture of the full-length enzyme has remained undefined. Here we present the structure of a fully catalytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase II homodimer complexed with DNA and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. The enzyme adopts a domain-swapped configuration wherein the ATPase domain of one protomer sits atop the nucleolytic region of its partner subunit. This organization produces an unexpected interaction between bound DNA and a conformational transducing element in the ATPase domain, which we show is critical for both DNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and global topoisomerase activity. Our data indicate that the ATPase domains pivot about each other to ensure unidirectional strand passage and that this state senses bound DNA to promote ATP turnover and enzyme reset.  
  Call Number Serial 2189  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Williams, R.P.; Gott, C.L.; Qadri, S.M.; Scott, R.H. file  url
openurl 
  Title Influence of temperature of incubation and type of growth medium on pigmentation in Serratia marcescens Type Journal Article
  Year 1971 Publication Journal of Bacteriology Abbreviated Journal J Bacteriol  
  Volume 106 Issue (up) 2 Pages 438-443  
  Keywords Anti-Bacterial Agents/*biosynthesis; Bacterial Proteins/biosynthesis; Bacteriological Techniques; Caseins; Cell Division; Chloramphenicol/pharmacology; *Culture Media; Hot Temperature; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Oxygen; Pigments, Biological/*biosynthesis; Prodigiosin/biosynthesis; Protein Hydrolysates; Pyrroles/*biosynthesis; Saccharomyces; Serratia marcescens/cytology/drug effects/growth & development/*metabolism; Spectrophotometry; *Temperature; Time Factors  
  Abstract Maximal amounts of prodigiosin were synthesized in either minimal or complete medium after incubation of cultures at 27 C for 7 days. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin began earlier and the range of temperature for formation was greater in complete medium. No prodigiosin was formed in either medium when cultures were incubated at 38 C; however, after a shift to 27 C, pigmentation ensued, provided the period of incubation at 38 C was not longer than 36 hr for minimal medium or 48 hr for complete medium. Washed, nonpigmented cells grown in either medium at 38 C for 72 hr could synthesize prodigiosin when suspended in saline at 27 C when casein hydrolysate was added. These suspensions produced less prodigiosin at a slower rate than did cultures growing in casein hydrolysate at 27 C without prior incubation at 38 C. Optimal concentration of casein hydrolysate for pigment formation by suspensions was 0.4%; optimal temperature was 27 C. Anaerobic incubation, shift back to 38 C, killing cells by heating, or chloramphenicol (25 mug/ml) inhibited pigmentation. Suspensions of washed cells forming pigment reached pH 8.0 to 8.3 rapidly and maintained this pH throughout incubation for 7 days. Measurements of viable count and of protein, plus other data, indicated that cellular multiplication did not occur in suspensions of washed cells during pigment formation. By this procedure utilizing a shift down in temperature, biosynthesis of prodigiosin by washed cells could be separated from multiplication of bacteria.  
  Call Number Serial 1615  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Durieu-Trautmann, O.; Delavier-Klutchko, C. file  url
openurl 
  Title Effect of ammonia and glutamine on macromolecule synthesis and breakdown during sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Type Journal Article
  Year 1977 Publication Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Biochem Biophys Res Commun  
  Volume 79 Issue (up) 2 Pages 438-442  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The effect of two known inhibitors of sporulation in yeast, ammonia and glutamine, on certain biochemical events during sporogenesis have been studied using sporulating and non sporulating cells. Both strains gave similar results on the increase in dry cell weight, protein and RNA breakdown and the suppression of the intensive RNA and protein syntheses occurring after 4 hours. The inhibitory effect of ammonia and glutamine on RNA and protein syntheses is reversible under the same conditions which do so for sporulation.

Subject Headings: Ammonia/*pharmacology; DNA/biosynthesis; Fungal Proteins/biosynthesis; Glutamine/*pharmacology; Kinetics; RNA/biosynthesis; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/drug effects/*metabolism; Spores, Fungal/drug effects/metabolism
 
  Call Number Serial 2319  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Favelukes, G.; Stoppani, A.O. url  openurl
  Title Baker's-yeast fumarase, a thiol enzyme Type Journal Article
  Year 1958 Publication Biochimica et Biophysica Acta Abbreviated Journal Biochim Biophys Acta  
  Volume 28 Issue (up) 3 Pages 654-655  
  Keywords *Hydro-Lyases; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*metabolism; *Hydrases; *SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE/metabolism  
  Abstract  
  Call Number Grinnell @ engelk @ Serial 483  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Zaitsev, V.; Zaitseva, I.; Duke, E.; Lindley, P.; McSweeny, S.; Svensson, A.; Keruchenko, J.; Keruchenko, I.; Gladilin, K.; Banaszak, L. file  url
openurl 
  Title Crystal structures of native and recombinant yeast fumarase Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Journal of Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal J Mol Biol  
  Volume 280 Issue (up) 3 Pages 431-442  
  Keywords Binding Sites; Crystallography, X-Ray; Fumarate Hydratase/*chemistry; Fungal Proteins/*chemistry; Models, Molecular; Polymers/chemistry; *Protein Conformation; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*enzymology; Water/chemistry  
  Abstract Crystal structures for both native and recombinant forms of yeast fumarase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been completed to moderate resolution by two separate laboratories. The recombinant form was obtained by the construction of an expression plasmid for Escherichia coli. Despite a high level of amino acid sequence similarity, purification of the eukaryotic enzyme from the wild-type prokaryotic enzyme was feasible. The crystal structure of the native form, NY-fumarase, encompasses residues R22 through M484, while the recombinant form, RY-fumarase, consists of residues S27 through L485. Both crystal structures lack the N-terminal translocation segment. Each subunit of the homo-tetrameric protein has three domains. The active site is formed by segments from each of three polypeptide chains. The results of these studies on the eukaryotic proteins are unique, since the recombinant form was done in the absence of dicarboxylic acid and has an unoccupied active site. As a comparison, native fumarase was crystallized in the presence of the competitive inhibitor, meso-tartrate. Meso-tartrate occupies a position close to that of the bound citrate molecule found in the active site of the E. coli enzyme. This inhibitor participates in hydrogen bonding to an active-site water molecule. The independent determination of the two structures provides further evidence that an active-site water molecule may play an active role in the fumarase-catalyzed reaction.  
  Call Number Serial 1178  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yogev, O.; Yogev, O.; Singer, E.; Shaulian, E.; Goldberg, M.; Fox, T.D.; Pines, O. file  url
openurl 
  Title Fumarase: a mitochondrial metabolic enzyme and a cytosolic/nuclear component of the DNA damage response Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication PLoS Biology Abbreviated Journal PLoS Biol  
  Volume 8 Issue (up) 3 Pages e1000328  
  Keywords Cell Nucleus/*metabolism; Cytosol/*metabolism; *DNA Damage; Fumarate Hydratase/genetics/*metabolism; Fumarates/metabolism; Gene Knockdown Techniques; HeLa Cells; Histones/genetics/metabolism; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism; Isoenzymes/genetics/*metabolism; Kidney Neoplasms/enzymology/genetics; Leiomyomatosis/enzymology/genetics; Mitochondria/*enzymology; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/enzymology/genetics; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics/metabolism  
  Abstract In eukaryotes, fumarase (FH in human) is a well-known tricarboxylic-acid-cycle enzyme in the mitochondrial matrix. However, conserved from yeast to humans is a cytosolic isoenzyme of fumarase whose function in this compartment remains obscure. A few years ago, FH was surprisingly shown to underlie a tumor susceptibility syndrome, Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (HLRCC). A biallelic inactivation of FH has been detected in almost all HLRCC tumors, and therefore FH was suggested to function as a tumor suppressor. Recently it was suggested that FH inhibition leads to elevated intracellular fumarate, which in turn acts as a competitive inhibitor of HPH (HIF prolyl hydroxylase), thereby causing stabilization of HIF (Hypoxia-inducible factor) by preventing proteasomal degradation. The transcription factor HIF increases the expression of angiogenesis regulated genes, such as VEGF, which can lead to high microvessel density and tumorigenesis. Yet this mechanism does not fully explain the large cytosolic population of fumarase molecules. We constructed a yeast strain in which fumarase is localized exclusively to mitochondria. This led to the discovery that the yeast cytosolic fumarase plays a key role in the protection of cells from DNA damage, particularly from DNA double-strand breaks. We show that the cytosolic fumarase is a member of the DNA damage response that is recruited from the cytosol to the nucleus upon DNA damage induction. This function of fumarase depends on its enzymatic activity, and its absence in cells can be complemented by high concentrations of fumaric acid. Our findings suggest that fumarase and fumaric acid are critical elements of the DNA damage response, which underlies the tumor suppressor role of fumarase in human cells and which is most probably HIF independent. This study shows an exciting crosstalk between primary metabolism and the DNA damage response, thereby providing a scenario for metabolic control of tumor propagation.  
  Call Number Serial 1880  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations: