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Author (up) Adachi, R.; Wakabayashi, T.; Oda, N.; Shingai, R. file  url
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  Title Modulation of Caenorhabditis elegans chemotaxis by cultivation and assay temperatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Neuroscience Research Abbreviated Journal Neurosci Res  
  Volume 60 Issue 3 Pages 300-306  
  Keywords Ammonium Chloride; Animals; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Caenorhabditis elegans/*physiology; Chemoreceptor Cells/physiology; Chemotaxis/*physiology; Neurons, Afferent/*physiology; Sodium Acetate; Stimulation, Chemical; *Temperature  
  Abstract The chemotaxis behaviors of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans cultivated at various temperatures (15 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C) were examined at various temperatures (10 degrees C, 15 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C) to determine the multi-sensory integration of physical (thermal) and chemical sensory information within its nervous system. Chemotaxis behavior toward sodium acetate and ammonium chloride were differently affected by both assay and cultivation temperatures, suggesting that the temperature effect on chemotaxis is not general, but rather distinctive for each chemosensory pathway. Since thermosensory cues are likely encountered constantly in C. elegans, we supposed that the chemotaxis behaviors of worms are achieved by the integration of chemo- and thermosensory information. To verify the possible contribution of thermosensory function in chemotaxis, we examined the chemotaxis behaviors of ttx-1(p767) mutant worms with defective AFD thermosensory neurons. The chemotaxis behaviors toward sodium acetate or ammonium chloride of mutant worms cultivated at 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C were reduced relative to those of wild-type worms. These results indicate the important role of multi-sensory integration of chemosensory and thermosensory information in chemotaxis behavior of the C. elegans.  
  Call Number Serial 1025  
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Author (up) Mah, K.B.; Rankin, C.H. file  url
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  Title An analysis of behavioral plasticity in male Caenorhabditis elegans Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Behavioral and Neural Biology Abbreviated Journal Behav Neural Biol  
  Volume 58 Issue 3 Pages 211-221  
  Keywords Animals; Arousal/physiology; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Caenorhabditis elegans/*physiology; Copulation/physiology; Disorders of Sex Development; Habituation, Psychophysiologic/physiology; Male; Motor Activity/physiology; Nervous System Physiological Phenomena; Neural Inhibition/physiology; Neuronal Plasticity/*physiology; Reversal Learning/physiology  
  Abstract Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple soil-dwelling nematode which has two sexes, hermaphrodite and male. The male C. elegans is differentiated from the hermaphrodite by the presence of 14 sensory structures in the tail. In this study, we compared the behavioral responses of males and hermaphrodites to head-touch and to tap. We hypothesized that the anatomical difference in sensory structures might result in behavioral differences in the reversal response to vibratory stimulation (a tap to the side of the holding dish). In the response to increasing intensities of tap, both sexes showed an increase in response magnitude, with the males showing larger responses than hermaphrodites. In addition, the male was shown to be capable of simple nonassociative learning: it demonstrated habituation and recovery from habituation in a similar manner as the hermaphrodite. Tail-touch-induced inhibition of the reversal response appeared to be similar in males and hermaphrodites. The evidence suggests that the touch withdrawal circuit in hermaphrodites is also present in the male C. elegans, and that the subtle differences in response to tap seen in males may result from the additional sensory receptors of the copulatory bursa of the tail. It seems clear from these studies that these structures do not play a key role in the male worm's response to tap.  
  Call Number Serial 463  
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Author (up) Zariwala, H.A.; Miller, A.C.; Faumont, S.; Lockery, S.R. file  url
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  Title Step response analysis of thermotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal J Neurosci  
  Volume 23 Issue 10 Pages 4369-4377  
  Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Caenorhabditis elegans/*physiology; Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins/genetics/physiology; Cell Movement/*physiology; Cold Temperature; Escape Reaction/physiology; Motor Activity/genetics/physiology; Mutation; Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics/physiology; *Temperature  
  Abstract The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans migrates toward a preferred temperature on a thermal gradient. A candidate neural network for thermotaxis in C. elegans has been identified, but the behavioral strategy implemented by this network is poorly understood. In this study, we tested whether thermal migration is achieved by modulating the probability of turning behavior, as in C. elegans chemotaxis. This was done by subjecting unrestrained wild-type, cryophilic, or thermophilic worms to rapid spatially uniform temperature steps (3 degrees C), up or down from the cultivation temperature. Each of the three types of worms we analyzed showed a different pair of responses to the two types of steps. Comparison of wild-type and mutant response patterns suggested a model in which thermal migration involves a unique response to the gradient depending on the orientation of the worm relative to its preferred temperature. Overall, however, turning probability was modulated in a manner consistent with a role for turning behavior in thermal migration. Our results suggest that sensory systems for thermotaxis and chemotaxis may converge on a common behavioral mechanism.  
  Call Number Serial 263  
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