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Author (up) Coleman, C.; Copetti, D.; Cipriani, G.; Hoffmann, S.; Kozma, P.; Kovacs, L.; Morgante, M.; Testolin, R.; Di Gaspero, G. file  url
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  Title The powdery mildew resistance gene REN1 co-segregates with an NBS-LRR gene cluster in two Central Asian grapevines Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication BMC Genetics Abbreviated Journal BMC Genet  
  Volume 10 Issue Pages 89  
  Keywords *Evolution, Molecular; Genetic Markers; Genome, Plant; Multigene Family; Phenotype; Phylogeny; Plant Diseases/*genetics/microbiology; Plant Proteins/*genetics; Segmental Duplications, Genomic; Vitis/*genetics  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Grape powdery mildew is caused by the North American native pathogen Erysiphe necator. Eurasian Vitis vinifera varieties were all believed to be susceptible. REN1 is the first resistance gene naturally found in cultivated plants of Vitis vinifera. RESULTS: REN1 is present in 'Kishmish vatkana' and 'Dzhandzhal kara', two grapevines documented in Central Asia since the 1920's. These cultivars have a second-degree relationship (half sibs, grandparent-grandchild, or avuncular), and share by descent the chromosome on which the resistance allele REN1 is located. The REN1 interval was restricted to 1.4 cM using 38 SSR markers distributed across the locus and the segregation of the resistance phenotype in two progenies of collectively 461 offspring, derived from either resistant parent. The boundary markers delimit a 1.4-Mbp sequence in the PN40024 reference genome, which contains 27 genes with known functions, 2 full-length coiled-coil NBS-LRR genes, and 9 NBS-LRR pseudogenes. In the REN1 locus of PN40024, NBS genes have proliferated through a mixture of segmental duplications, tandem gene duplications, and intragenic recombination between paralogues, indicating that the REN1 locus has been inherently prone to producing genetic variation. Three SSR markers co-segregate with REN1, the outer ones confining the 908-kb array of NBS-LRR genes. Kinship and clustering analyses based on genetic distances with susceptible cultivars representative of Central Asian Vitis vinifera indicated that 'Kishmish vatkana' and 'Dzhandzhal kara' fit well into local germplasm. 'Kishmish vatkana' also has a parent-offspring relationship with the seedless table grape 'Sultanina'. In addition, the distant genetic relatedness to rootstocks, some of which are derived from North American species resistant to powdery mildew and have been used worldwide to guard against phylloxera since the late 1800's, argues against REN1 being infused into Vitis vinifera from a recent interspecific hybridisation. CONCLUSION: The REN1 gene resides in an NBS-LRR gene cluster tightly delimited by two flanking SSR markers, which can assist in the selection of this DNA block in breeding between Vitis vinifera cultivars. The REN1 locus has multiple layers of structural complexity compared with its two closely related paralogous NBS clusters, which are located some 5 Mbp upstream and 4 Mbp downstream of the REN1 interval on the same chromosome.  
  Call Number Serial 193  
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Author (up) Kosova, K.; Vitamvas, P.; Prasil, I.T.; Renaut, J. file  url
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  Title Plant proteome changes under abiotic stress--contribution of proteomics studies to understanding plant stress response Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Proteomics Abbreviated Journal J Proteomics  
  Volume 74 Issue 8 Pages 1301-1322  
  Keywords Arabidopsis/genetics; Cold Temperature/adverse effects; Droughts; Gene Expression Profiling; Herbicides/pharmacology; Hot Temperature/adverse effects; Metals, Heavy/adverse effects; Oryza sativa/genetics; Plant Proteins/*genetics; Plants/*genetics; Protein Processing, Post-Translational; Proteome/*genetics; Stress, Physiological/*genetics  
  Abstract Plant acclimation to stress is associated with profound changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. In this review, proteomics studies dealing with plant response to a broad range of abiotic stress factors--cold, heat, drought, waterlogging, salinity, ozone treatment, hypoxia and anoxia, herbicide treatments, inadequate or excessive light conditions, disbalances in mineral nutrition, enhanced concentrations of heavy metals, radioactivity and mechanical wounding are discussed. Most studies have been carried out on model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice due to large protein sequence databases available; however, the variety of plant species used for proteomics analyses is rapidly increasing. Protein response pathways shared by different plant species under various stress conditions (glycolytic pathway, enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, accumulation of LEA proteins) as well as pathways unique to a given stress are discussed. Results from proteomics studies are interpreted with respect to physiological factors determining plant stress response. In conclusion, examples of application of proteomics studies in search for protein markers underlying phenotypic variation in physiological parameters associated with plant stress tolerance are given.  
  Call Number Serial 229  
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