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  Title Graph of Past and Projected Changes of Sea Level Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Climate change; Sea level rise  
  Abstract The graph shows how sea levels will change for four different pathways for human development and greenhouse gas pollution. The green, yellow and orange lines correspond to scenarios where it takes 10, 30, or 70 years before emissions are stabilized. The red line can be considered to represent business as usual where greenhouse gas emissions are increasing over time.  
  Call Number Serial 1839  
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  Title Estimated, observed, and possible future amounts of global sea level rise from 1800 to 2100, relative to the year 2000. Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Climate change; Sea level rise  
  Abstract Estimated, observed, and possible future amounts of global sea level rise from 1800 to 2100, relative to the year 2000. Estimates from proxy data (for example, based on sediment records) are shown in red (1800-1890, pink band shows uncertainty), tide gauge data are shown in blue for 1880-2009, and satellite observations are shown in green from 1993 to 2012. The future scenarios range from 0.66 feet to 6.6 feet in 2100. These scenarios are not based on climate model simulations, but rather reflect the range of possible scenarios based on other scientific studies. The orange line at right shows the currently projected range of sea level rise of 1 to 4 feet by 2100, which falls within the larger risk-based scenario range. The large projected range reflects uncertainty about how glaciers and ice sheets will react to the warming ocean, the warming atmosphere, and changing winds and currents. As seen in the observations, there are year-to-year variations in the trend. (Figure source: Adapted from Parris et al. 2012 with input from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory).  
  Call Number Serial 1840  
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Author (up) file  url
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  Title Past and future sea-level rise Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Climate change; Sea level rise  
  Abstract Past and future sea-level rise. For the past, proxy data are shown in light purple and tide gauge data in blue. For the future, the IPCC projections for very high emissions (red, RCP8.5 scenario) and very low emissions (blue, RCP2.6 scenario) are shown. Source: IPCC AR5 Fig. 13.27.  
  Call Number Serial 1841  
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Author (up) Al-Jibori, S.A.; Al-Jibori, M.H.S.; Hogarth, G. file  url
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  Title Thiosaccharinate binding to palladium(II) and platinum(II): Synthesis and molecular structures of sulfur-bound complexes [M(κ1-tsac)2(κ2-diphosphane)] Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Inorganica Chimica Acta Abbreviated Journal Inorganica Chimica Acta  
  Volume 398 Issue Pages 117-123  
  Keywords Platinum; Palladium; Thiosaccharinate; Diphosphane; X-ray crystallography  
  Abstract Palladium(II) and platinum(II) thiosaccharinate complexes [M(1-tsac)2(2-Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2}] (M = Pd, Pt; n = 14) have been prepared, palladium complexes from reaction of [Pd(tsac)2]·H2O with diphosphanes and platinum complexes from addition of thiosaccharin to [PtCl22-Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2}] in the presence of triethylamine. All complexes have been fully characterized and the crystal structures of [Pd1-tsac)2(2-dppp)] (n = 3) and [Pt1-tsac)2(2-dppm)] (n = 1) have been determined confirming that thiosaccharinate ligands are S-bound. The larger ring complexes (n = 3, 4) are fluxional in solution being attributed to the conformational flexibility of the diphosphane backbones The bis(diphosphane) complexes, [M(1-tsac)2(1-dppm)2] (M = Pd, Pt), have also been prepared upon treatment of [Pd(tsac)2]·H2O with two equivalents of dppm or addition of thiosaccharin to [Pt(2-dppm)2]Cl2 in the presence of triethylamine in which the diphosphanes bind in a monodentate fashion. Both are highly fluxional in solution, changes in the 31P{1H} NMR spectra as a function of temperature being interpreted as the exchange of bound and unbound phosphorus atoms.  
  Call Number Serial 1825  
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Author (up) Alarcon, G.M.; Edwards, J.M.; Clark, P.C. file  url
openurl 
  Title Coping strategies and first year performance in postsecondary education Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Social Psychology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Soc Psychol  
  Volume 43 Issue 8 Pages 1676-1685  
  Keywords Coping; GPA; Grade point average; College; University; First year  
  Abstract Coping was hypothesized to explain additional variance in first year grade point averages (GPAs) controlling for cognitive ability and conscientiousness. First year GPAs were assessed as criterion for performance in the first year. Results indicate active coping, denial, behavioral disengagement, and alcohol disengagement are related to first year GPA. Denial and alcohol disengagement coping strategies were significant predictors and negatively related to first year GPA in the final regression equation controlling for cognitive ability and conscientiousness. Latent growth modeling analysis demonstrated cognitive ability predicted both the intercept and slope of first year GPA. Conscientiousness was a predictor of initial GPA but not change. Lastly, coping was a significant predictor of change in GPA. Implications for research and theory are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 1167  
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Author (up) Arrant, A.E.; Schramm-Sapyta, N.L.; Kuhn, C.M. file  url
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  Title Use of the light/dark test for anxiety in adult and adolescent male rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 256 Issue Pages 119-127  
  Keywords Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology; Age Factors; Animals; Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology; Anxiety/*diagnosis/drug therapy; Carbolines/pharmacology; Exploratory Behavior/drug effects; Factor Analysis, Statistical; *Light; Male; Motor Activity/drug effects; *Neuropsychological Tests; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Regression Analysis; Risk-Taking; Time Factors; Yohimbine/pharmacology; Adolescence; Anxiety; Fg-7142; Factor analysis; Light/dark test; Yohimbine  
  Abstract The light/dark (LD) test is a commonly used rodent test of unconditioned anxiety-like behavior that is based on an approach/avoidance conflict between the drive to explore novel areas and an aversion to brightly lit, open spaces. We used the LD test to investigate developmental differences in behavior between adolescent (postnatal day (PN) 28-34) and adult (PN67-74) male rats. We investigated whether LD behavioral measures reflect anxiety-like behavior similarly in each age group using factor analysis and multiple regression. These analyses showed that time in the light compartment, percent distance in the light, rearing, and latency to emerge into the light compartment were measures of anxiety-like behavior in each age group, while total distance traveled and distance in the dark compartment provided indices of locomotor activity. We then used these measures to assess developmental differences in baseline LD behavior and the response to anxiogenic drugs. Adolescent rats emerged into the light compartment more quickly than adults and made fewer pokes into the light compartment. These age differences could reflect greater risk taking and less risk assessment in adolescent rats than adults. Adolescent rats were less sensitive than adults to the anxiogenic effects of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142) and the alpha(2) adrenergic antagonist yohimbine on anxiety-like behaviors validated by factor analysis, but locomotor variables were similarly affected. These data support the results of the factor analysis and indicate that GABAergic and noradrenergic modulation of LD anxiety-like behavior may be immature during adolescence.  
  Call Number Serial 1614  
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Author (up) Bernhardt, B.A.; Soucier, D.; Hanson, K.; Savage, M.S.; Jackson, L.; Wapner, R.J. file  url
openurl 
  Title Women's experiences receiving abnormal prenatal chromosomal microarray testing results Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Genetics in Medicine : Official Journal of the American College of Medical Genetics Abbreviated Journal Genet Med  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 139-145  
  Keywords Adult; Chromosome Aberrations; Chromosome Disorders--diagnosis, genetics, psychology; Female; Genetic Counseling--methods, psychology; Genetic Testing--methods; Humans; Pilot Projects; Pregnancy; Prenatal Diagnosis--methods, psychology; Truth Disclosure  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Genomic microarrays can detect copy-number variants not detectable by conventional cytogenetics. This technology is diffusing rapidly into prenatal settings even though the clinical implications of many copy-number variants are currently unknown. We conducted a qualitative pilot study to explore the experiences of women receiving abnormal results from prenatal microarray testing performed in a research setting. METHODS: Participants were a subset of women participating in a multicenter prospective study “Prenatal Cytogenetic Diagnosis by Array-based Copy Number Analysis.” Telephone interviews were conducted with 23 women receiving abnormal prenatal microarray results. RESULTS: We found that five key elements dominated the experiences of women who had received abnormal prenatal microarray results: an offer too good to pass up, blindsided by the results, uncertainty and unquantifiable risks, need for support, and toxic knowledge. CONCLUSION: As prenatal microarray testing is increasingly used, uncertain findings will be common, resulting in greater need for careful pre- and posttest counseling, and more education of and resources for providers so they can adequately support the women who are undergoing testing.  
  Call Number Serial 560  
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Author (up) Bi, L.-L.; Wang, J.; Luo, Z.-Y.; Chen, S.-P.; Geng, F.; Chen, Y.-hua; Li, S.-J.; Yuan, C.-hua; Lin, S.; Gao, T.-M. file  url
openurl 
  Title Enhanced excitability in the infralimbic cortex produces anxiety-like behaviors Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Neuropharmacology Abbreviated Journal Neuropharmacology  
  Volume 72 Issue Pages 148-156  
  Keywords 6-Cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione/pharmacology/therapeutic use; Animals; Animals, Newborn; Anxiety/chemically induced/drug therapy/*pathology; Bicuculline/toxicity; Disease Models, Animal; Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists/pharmacology/therapeutic use; Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials/drug effects/*physiology; Exploratory Behavior/drug effects; GABA-A Receptor Antagonists/toxicity; In Vitro Techniques; Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials/drug effects; Injections, Intraventricular; Male; Maze Learning/drug effects; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Patch-Clamp Techniques; Prefrontal Cortex/drug effects/*physiopathology  
  Abstract The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in modulating anxiety. However, it is unknown whether excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmission in the infralimbic (IL) subregion of the mPFC underlies the pathology of anxiety-related behavior. To address this issue, we infused the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist bicuculline to temporarily activate the IL cortex. IL cortex activation decreased the time spent in the center area in the open field test, decreased exploration of the open-arms in the elevated plus maze test, and increased the latency to bite food in the novelty-suppressed feeding test. These findings substantiate the GABAergic system's role in anxiety-related behaviors. IL cortex inactivation with the AMPA receptor (AMPAR) antagonist CNQX produced opposite, anxiolytic effects. However, infusion of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist AP5 into the IL cortex had no significant effect. Additionally, we did not observe motor activity deficits or appetite deficits following inhibition of GABAergic or glutamatergic neurotransmission. Interestingly, we found parallel and corresponding electrophysiological changes in anxious mice; compared to mice with relatively low anxiety, the relatively high anxiety mice exhibited smaller evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) and larger AMPA-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in pyramidal neurons in the IL cortex. The changes of eIPSCs and eEPSCs were due to presynaptic mechanisms. Our results suggest that imbalances of neurotransmission in the IL cortex may cause a net increase in excitatory inputs onto pyramidal neurons, which may underlie the pathogenic mechanism of anxiety disorders.  
  Call Number Serial 1045  
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Author (up) Briegel-Jones, R.M.H.; Knowles, Z.; Eubank, M.R.; Giannoulatos, K.; Elliot, D. file  url
openurl 
  Title A Preliminary Investigation into the Effect of Yoga Practice on Mindfulness and Flow in Elite Youth Swimmers Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Sport Psychologist Abbreviated Journal The Sport Psychologist  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 349-359  
  Keywords mixed methods, performance based intervention  
  Abstract Research has indicated positive effects of mindfulness training as a performance-based intervention and of yoga on mindfulness. This study examined the effects of a 10-week yoga intervention on mindfulness and dispositional flow of elite youth swimmers using a mixed methods design. No significant changes in mindfulness and dispositional flow were identified. Qualitative data suggested that the 10-week yoga intervention had a positive impact on a range of physiological, cognitive, and performance parameters that included elements of mindfulness and flow. Methodological considerations for future research are discussed.  
  Call Number Serial 2128  
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Author (up) Brinkmann, G. file  url
openurl 
  Title Generating regular directed graphs Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Discrete Mathematics Abbreviated Journal Discrete Mathematics  
  Volume 313 Issue 1 Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Directed Graph; Canonical Construction Path; Structure Generation; Bipartite  
  Abstract In this article we describe an algorithm to efficiently generate all regular directed graphs for a given number of vertices and given degree. The directed graphs are constructed from regular bipartite (undirected) graphs.  
  Call Number Serial 775  
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